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3d printed guns, Bitcoin, and Crypto-anarchy

sdavio
Posts: 1,798
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8/22/2014 6:09:40 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Wondering if anyone here has thoughts on this.

This is the Crypto-anarchist manifesto:

http://www.activism.net...

It is very short and an easy read. It is from 1988, but forecasts some of the most recent developments in technology and politics, including things like Wikileaks, the reputation systems used in most online transactions, internet currency, and so on.

The primary idea behind crypto-anarchy is that the cryptography made possible by modern computing and the increasing efficiency and the unilateral nature of accessibility to the internet will make it feasible to 'shut out' government from areas they would otherwise like to control, making the issue no longer simply a debate of whether the government should choose to enact control, but take the possibility of control fundamentally into question. In the broader scope, the aim would be to radically undermine the possibility for any group or corporation to maintain a monopoly on objects, or information.

A metal gun has already been developed which can be freely downloaded and printed by anyone with the 3d printer.

"A Californian engineering company says it has produced the first metal gun made on a 3D printer, releasing a video showing the firearm scoring repeated bullseyes in successful tests..."

http://www.smh.com.au...

3d printers are currently in their infancy and are quite expensive, but we can expect the costs to reduce, and capabilities to rise in line with what is usual with technology. Since the files have already been put online, they are already available and are impossible to 'take back'. It would also be very unrealistic for any government to attempt regulating these printers or the materials used with them.

The advent of Bitcoin, an online digital currency, makes realistic also the concept of blocking out government interference with currency. Vast black markets already exist in what is called the 'deep web' which use reputation systems and combine the use of crypto-currencies and anonymous browsers like Tor to engage in completely anonymous transactions.

Observe the massive failure which was the state's attempts to control and put an end to the online piracy of music and films. Combining the fact that the internet is extremely difficult to regulate, with the normal rate at which technology is known to improve, how realistic is the idea that it will be at all possible for any group to maintain a monopoly on either commodities or information in the near future, once these technologies proliferate?
"Logic is the money of the mind." - Karl Marx
Juris_Naturalis
Posts: 273
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8/23/2014 10:07:34 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 8/22/2014 6:09:40 AM, sdavio wrote:
Wondering if anyone here has thoughts on this.

This is the Crypto-anarchist manifesto:

http://www.activism.net...

It is very short and an easy read. It is from 1988, but forecasts some of the most recent developments in technology and politics, including things like Wikileaks, the reputation systems used in most online transactions, internet currency, and so on.

The primary idea behind crypto-anarchy is that the cryptography made possible by modern computing and the increasing efficiency and the unilateral nature of accessibility to the internet will make it feasible to 'shut out' government from areas they would otherwise like to control, making the issue no longer simply a debate of whether the government should choose to enact control, but take the possibility of control fundamentally into question. In the broader scope, the aim would be to radically undermine the possibility for any group or corporation to maintain a monopoly on objects, or information.

A metal gun has already been developed which can be freely downloaded and printed by anyone with the 3d printer.

"A Californian engineering company says it has produced the first metal gun made on a 3D printer, releasing a video showing the firearm scoring repeated bullseyes in successful tests..."

http://www.smh.com.au...

3d printers are currently in their infancy and are quite expensive, but we can expect the costs to reduce, and capabilities to rise in line with what is usual with technology. Since the files have already been put online, they are already available and are impossible to 'take back'. It would also be very unrealistic for any government to attempt regulating these printers or the materials used with them.

The advent of Bitcoin, an online digital currency, makes realistic also the concept of blocking out government interference with currency. Vast black markets already exist in what is called the 'deep web' which use reputation systems and combine the use of crypto-currencies and anonymous browsers like Tor to engage in completely anonymous transactions.

Observe the massive failure which was the state's attempts to control and put an end to the online piracy of music and films. Combining the fact that the internet is extremely difficult to regulate, with the normal rate at which technology is known to improve, how realistic is the idea that it will be at all possible for any group to maintain a monopoly on either commodities or information in the near future, once these technologies proliferate?

Where does it say that that 1911 is downloadable by anyone?
sdavio
Posts: 1,798
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8/23/2014 10:17:43 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 8/23/2014 10:07:34 AM, Juris_Naturalis wrote:
At 8/22/2014 6:09:40 AM, sdavio wrote:
Where does it say that that 1911 is downloadable by anyone?

Oh I was mistaken, it is the Liberator which is of course downloadable.
"Logic is the money of the mind." - Karl Marx
Juris_Naturalis
Posts: 273
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8/23/2014 3:41:21 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 8/23/2014 10:17:43 AM, sdavio wrote:
At 8/23/2014 10:07:34 AM, Juris_Naturalis wrote:
At 8/22/2014 6:09:40 AM, sdavio wrote:
Where does it say that that 1911 is downloadable by anyone?

Oh I was mistaken, it is the Liberator which is of course downloadable.

Not legally anymore. You'd have to find someone to pass off the file to you.
sdavio
Posts: 1,798
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8/23/2014 11:54:44 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 8/23/2014 3:41:21 PM, Juris_Naturalis wrote:
At 8/23/2014 10:17:43 AM, sdavio wrote:
At 8/23/2014 10:07:34 AM, Juris_Naturalis wrote:
At 8/22/2014 6:09:40 AM, sdavio wrote:
Where does it say that that 1911 is downloadable by anyone?

Oh I was mistaken, it is the Liberator which is of course downloadable.

Not legally anymore. You'd have to find someone to pass off the file to you.

That's why it's called 'crypto-anarchy' and not 'crypto-orthodoxy'. :P Downloading music is illegal too, but that fact isn't very consequential.
"Logic is the money of the mind." - Karl Marx