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Nullification

Reasoning
Posts: 4,456
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7/2/2010 10:20:56 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
"Nullification is a legal theory that a U.S. State has the right to nullify, or invalidate, any federal law which that state has deemed unconstitutional. The theory is based on a view that the sovereign States formed the Union, and as creators of the compact hold final authority regarding the limits of the power of the central government. Under this, the compact theory, the States and not the Federal Bench are the ultimate interpreters of the extent of the national Government's power. A more extreme assertion of state sovereignty than nullification is the related action of secession, by which a state terminates its political affiliation with the Union.

One of the earliest and most famous examples is to be found in the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, a protest against the Alien and Sedition Acts. In these resolutions, authors Thomas Jefferson and James Madison argued that the states are the ultimate interpreters of the Constitution and can "interpose" to protect state citizens from the operation of unconstitutional national laws.

While some interests in northern states occasionally considered the possibility of secession after Jefferson's party gained control of the federal government in the years after 1801, for example at the Hartford Convention, the idea of nullification increasingly became associated with the southern states as a means of protecting the institution of slavery. The most famous statement of the theory of nullification, authored by John C. Calhoun, appeared in the South Carolina Exposition and Protest of 1828. Four years later, during the Nullification Crisis, South Carolina undertook to nullify a federal tariff law and a subsequent federal bill authorizing the use of force against the state.

Northern states in the 1840s and 1850s attempted to block enforcement of the pro-slavery federal Fugitive Slave Acts of 1793 and 1850. These actions had the effect, in many local situations, of nullifying the effectiveness of these laws, but did not declare that the fugitive slave laws were nullified. The most famous examples of this centered around northern states' personal liberty laws. The U.S. Supreme Court dealt with the validity of these laws in the 1842 case of Prigg v. Pennsylvania. The Supreme Court also dealt with this issue in the 1859 case of Ableman v. Booth." - Wikipedia[1]

1 http://en.wikipedia.org...
"What we really ought to ask the liberal, before we even begin addressing his agenda, is this: In what kind of society would he be a conservative?" - Joseph Sobran
Strikeeagle84015
Posts: 867
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7/2/2010 10:22:09 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
What is the question?
: At 8/17/2010 7:17:56 AM, I-am-a-panda wrote:
: Hey dawg, i herd you like evangelical trolls so we put a bible thumper in yo bible thumper so you can troll while you troll!

Arguing with an atheist about God is very similar to arguing with a blind man about what the Sistine Chapel looks like
Marilyn Poe

Strikeeagle wrote
The only way I will stop believing in God is if he appeared before me and told me that he did not exist.
JBlake
Posts: 4,634
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7/2/2010 11:20:17 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/2/2010 10:22:09 AM, Strikeeagle84015 wrote:
What is the question?

It seems like it is a general question on what we think about nullification.

I am really interested in this topic. I am going to go back to the periods in which state nullification was debated and see which side has a more powerful argument. Then I'll post here, or challenge Reasoning to a debate.
comoncents
Posts: 5,647
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7/2/2010 11:50:34 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
I like Nullification as Jefferson applied it but the argument is similar to asking a question about session, if you ask me.

People for it, people against it... sigh.
comoncents
Posts: 5,647
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7/2/2010 11:55:48 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/2/2010 11:50:34 AM, comoncents wrote:
I like Nullification as Jefferson applied it but the argument is similar to asking a question about session, if you ask me.

People for it, people against it... sigh.

Jackson showed away around it thought in the infamous "nullification crisis"
Strikeeagle84015
Posts: 867
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7/2/2010 2:22:43 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
I am pro nullification if 51% of the states support nullifying an act of congress but I am anti-secession
: At 8/17/2010 7:17:56 AM, I-am-a-panda wrote:
: Hey dawg, i herd you like evangelical trolls so we put a bible thumper in yo bible thumper so you can troll while you troll!

Arguing with an atheist about God is very similar to arguing with a blind man about what the Sistine Chapel looks like
Marilyn Poe

Strikeeagle wrote
The only way I will stop believing in God is if he appeared before me and told me that he did not exist.
PervRat
Posts: 963
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7/6/2010 3:44:23 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
And yet again we have an extremely lop-sided reporting. The most famous examples of states vs. fed were the civil war, when southern states refused to accept emancipation, and the Civil Rights Acts of the 1960s when federal troops had to escort racial minorities to school because of fascist states refusing to comply with desegregation.

The severe bias of the OP of this thread is more than a little disturbing.