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U.S. PRESIDENTIAL QUOTES about GOD

Bible-Prophecy
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2/14/2015 3:28:17 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
George Washington (1732-1799), was the 1st President of the United States.
George Washington said: "It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God
and the Bible."

Reference: America's God & Country Encyclopedia of Quotations, by William J. Federer,Page 660.

Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), was the 16th President of the United States of America.
He said: "I can see how it might be possible for a man to look down upon the earth and be an atheist,
But I cannot conceive how he could look up into the heavens and say there is no God."

Reference: http://thinkexist.com...

Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969), the 34th President of the United States.
Dwight David Eisenhower said: "Without God there could be no American form of government
nor an American way of life. Recognition of the Supreme Being is the first the most basic expression of Americanism."

Reference: http://thinkexist.com...
Welfare-Worker
Posts: 1,181
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2/14/2015 7:55:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 2/14/2015 3:28:17 AM, Bible-Prophecy wrote:
George Washington (1732-1799), was the 1st President of the United States.
George Washington said: "It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God
and the Bible."

This is a bogus quote and never appeared anywhere within the lifetime of GW.
Although you give no date for the quote, it is generally reputed to be September 17th, 1796, which is the date of GWs farewell address.
You can read a full copy of the address, and see tht it is not there.
http://earlyamerica.com...

There is extremely little evidence to indicate GW was a Christian, and ample evidence to show he was a Deist. There is also a small amount to indicate he was an atheist, but it is unconvincing.

Something else is missing from GWs farewell address.
His declaration that he was a Christian. There were many rumors concerning his faith, or lack of faith, and the clergy approached him just before his farewell address and implored him to clear matter, and profess his belief in the Christian religion.

Here is what Thomas Jefferson says:
"Feb. 1. Dr. Rush tells me that he had it from Asa Green that when the clergy addressed General Washington on his departure from the Government, it was observed in their consultation that he had never on any occasion said a word to the public which showed a belief in the Christian religion and they thought they should so pen their address [b]as to force him at length to declare publicly whether he was a Christian or not[/b]. They did so. However, he observed, [b]the old fox was too cunning for them. He answered every article in their address particularly except that, which he passed over without notice[/b]. Rush observes he never did say a word on the subject in any of his public papers except in his valedictory address to the governors of the States when he resigned his commission in the army, wherein he speaks of the benign influence of the Christian religion.
"I know that Gouverneur Morris, who pretended to be in his secrets and believed himself to be so, has often told me that General Washington believed no more in the system (Christianity) than he did."
(The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 1, p. 284.)

Although he attended church regularly (Does that make one a Christian?), he never took communion, a sacrament of the Christian church.

Bishop White, the father of the Protestant Episcopal church of America, is one of the most eminent names in church history. During a large portion of the period covering nearly a quarter of a century, Washington, with his wife, attended the churches in which Bishop White officiated. In a letter dated Fredericksburg, Aug. 13, 1835, Colonel Mercer sent Bishop White the following inquiry relative to this question:

Colonel Mercer: "I have a desire, my dear Sir, to know whether Gen. Washington was a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church, or whether he occasionally went to the communion only, or if ever he did so at all. ... No authority can be so authentic and complete as yours on this point."


To this inquiry Bishop White replied as follows:
"Philadelphia, Aug. 15, 1835.
"Dear Sir: In regard to the subject of your inquiry, truth requires me to say that Gen. Washington never received the communion in the churches of which I am the parochial minister. Mrs. Washington was an habitual communicant.
... I have been written to by many on that point, and have been obliged to answer them as I now do you. I am respectfully.
"Your humble servant,
"WILLIAM WHITE."

(Memoir of Bishop White, pp. 196, 197).

Washington"s preacher (Dr. Abercrombie), declared that Washington was not a Christian.
[1831, letter to a friend]
'With respect to the inquiry you make I can only state the following facts; that, as pastor of the Episcopal church, observing that, on sacramental Sundays, Gen. Washington, immediately after the desk and pulpit services, went out with the greater part of the congregation -- always leaving Mrs. Washington with the other communicants -- she invariably being one -- I considered it my duty in a sermon on Public Worship, to state the unhappy tendency of example, particularly of those in elevated stations who uniformly turned their backs upon the celebration of the Lord's Supper. I acknowledge the remark was intended for the President; and as such he received it. A few days after, in conversation with, I believe, a senator of the United States, he told me he had dined the day before with the President, who in the course of conversation at table said that on the preceding Sunday he had received a very just reproof from the pulpit for always leaving the church before the administration of the Sacrament; that he honored the preacher for his integrity and candor; that he had never sufficiently considered the influence of his example, and that he would not again give cause for the repetition of the reproof; and that, as he had never been a communicant, were he to become one then it would be imputed to an ostentatious display of religious zeal? arising altogether from his elevated station. Accordingly, he never afterwards came on the morning of sacramental Sunday, though at other times he was a constant attendant in the morning'" (Annals of the American Pulpit, Vol. v, p. 394) http://www.lothropp.org...

The Rev. Dr. Wilson (1777-1859 ) in one of his famous sermons clearly states that Washington was not a Christian.
"When the war was over and the victory over our enemies won, and the blessings and happiness of liberty and peace were secured, the Constitution was framed and God was neglected. He was not merely forgotten. He was absolutely voted out of the Constitution. The proceedings, as published by Thompson, the secretary, and the history of the day, show that the question was gravely debated whether God should be in the Constitution or not, and, after a solemn debate he was deliberately voted out of it. ... There is not only in the theory of our government no recognition of God's laws and sovereignty, but its practical operation, its administration, has been conformable to its theory. Those who have been called to administer the government have not been men making any public profession of Christianity. ... Washington was a man of valor and wisdom. He was esteemed by the whole world as a great and good man; but he was not a professing Christian."


Washington kneeling at valley Forge in 1777 was a complete fabrication:
Weems wrote a story that supposedly took place at Valley Forge, when a Quaker named Potts was walking through the woods near Washington's headquarters and, as he told his wife, he saw "the commander in chief of the American armies on his knees in prayer!" Potts told her that this proved that Washington was a man of God and that God would therefore save America.(9)

"The Potts story has been the most cherished of all the anecdotes about Washington at prayer, though, interestingly, it was never alluded to by Quaker writers on Washington, no even by those of a 'Free Quaker' of nonpacifist persuasion. It has been repeated with countless variations since Weems first put it forward; scores of witnesses attesting to the event (many years later) have been dug up by champions of the story; and many details have been added by later writes to Weems's original account....

"The Valley Forge story is, of course, utterly without foundation in fact. There was indeed a Quaker farmer named Isaac Potts who came into possession of a house in Valley Forge toward the end of the Revolutionary War; but he was nowhere near Valley Forge in the winter of 1777 when Washington was supposed to have been praying in the snow. Nevertheless, Washington's 'Gethsemene,' as the Valley Forge episode has been called, was eventually fixed in bronze on the Sub-Treasury Building in NY
Welfare-Worker
Posts: 1,181
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2/14/2015 8:00:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
"Harry Elmer Barnes remarks in his History and Social Intelligence, that "the majority of distinguished Americans in the generation of the Fathers were not even professing Christians." Dr. Barnes quotes from a sermon printed in 1831, in which the Rev. Dr. Wilson deplores the fact that most of the founders of our country were "infidels," and that "of the first seven presidents not one of them had professed his belief in Christianity."
http://www.wisdomworld.org....

See also: http://chnm.gmu.edu...
~ ~ ~

Religion of early presidents:

George Washington - Deist
John Adams - Unitarian
Thomas Jefferson - Deist
James Madison - Deist
James Monroe - Deist
John Quincy Adams - Deist
John Tyler - Deist
Millard Fillmore - Unitarian
Abraham Lincoln - Deist
Andrew Johnson - No affiliation
Ulysses S. Grant - No affiliation
Rutherford B. Hayes - No affiliation
William Howard Taft - Unitarian

http://www.presidentsusa.net...
http://www.nationmaster.com...
Varrack
Posts: 2,410
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2/14/2015 9:10:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago

George Washington (1732-1799), was the 1st President of the United StateVall

George Washington said: "It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God
and the Bible."

This is a bogus quote and never appeared anywhere within the lifetime of GW.
Although you give no date for the quote, it is generally reputed to be September 17th, 1796, which is the date of GWs farewell address.
You can read a full copy of the address, and see tht it is not there.
http://earlyamerica.com...

There is extremely little evidence to indicate GW was a Christian, and ample evidence to show he was a Deist. There is also a small amount to indicate he was an atheist, but it is unconvincing.

Something else is missing from GWs farewell address.
His declaration that he was a Christian. There were many rumors concerning his faith, or lack of faith, and the clergy approached him just before his farewell address and implored him to clear matter, and profess his belief in the Christian religion.

Here is what Thomas Jefferson says:
"Feb. 1. Dr. Rush tells me that he had it from Asa Green that when the clergy addressed General Washington on his departure from the Government, it was observed in their consultation that he had never on any occasion said a word to the public which showed a belief in the Christian religion and they thought they should so pen their address [b]as to force him at length to declare publicly whether he was a Christian or not[/b]. They did so. However, he observed, [b]the old fox was too cunning for them. He answered every article in their address particularly except that, which he passed over without notice[/b]. Rush observes he never did say a word on the subject in any of his public papers except in his valedictory address to the governors of the States when he resigned his commission in the army, wherein he speaks of the benign influence of the Christian religion.
"I know that Gouverneur Morris, who pretended to be in his secrets and believed himself to be so, has often told me that General Washington believed no more in the system (Christianity) than he did."
(The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 1, p. 284.)

Although he attended church regularly (Does that make one a Christian?), he never took communion, a sacrament of the Christian church.

Bishop White, the father of the Protestant Episcopal church of America, is one of the most eminent names in church history. During a large portion of the period covering nearly a quarter of a century, Washington, with his wife, attended the churches in which Bishop White officiated. In a letter dated Fredericksburg, Aug. 13, 1835, Colonel Mercer sent Bishop White the following inquiry relative to this question:

Colonel Mercer: "I have a desire, my dear Sir, to know whether Gen. Washington was a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church, or whether he occasionally went to the communion only, or if ever he did so at all. ... No authority can be so authentic and complete as yours on this point."


To this inquiry Bishop White replied as follows:
"Philadelphia, Aug. 15, 1835.
"Dear Sir: In regard to the subject of your inquiry, truth requires me to say that Gen. Washington never received the communion in the churches of which I am the parochial minister. Mrs. Washington was an habitual communicant.
... I have been written to by many on that point, and have been obliged to answer them as I now do you. I am respectfully.
"Your humble servant,
"WILLIAM WHITE."

(Memoir of Bishop White, pp. 196, 197).


Washington"s preacher (Dr. Abercrombie), declared that Washington was not a Christian.
[1831, letter to a friend]
'With respect to the inquiry you make I can only state the following facts; that, as pastor of the Episcopal church, observing that, on sacramental Sundays, Gen. Washington, immediately after the desk and pulpit services, went out with the greater part of the congregation -- always leaving Mrs. Washington with the other communicants -- she invariably being one -- I considered it my duty in a sermon on Public Worship, to state the unhappy tendency of example, particularly of those in elevated stations who uniformly turned their backs upon the celebration of the Lord's Supper. I acknowledge the remark was intended for the President; and as such he received it. A few days after, in conversation with, I believe, a senator of the United States, he told me he had dined the day before with the President, who in the course of conversation at table said that on the preceding Sunday he had received a very just reproof from the pulpit for always leaving the church before the administration of the Sacrament; that he honored the preacher for his integrity and candor; that he had never sufficiently considered the influence of his example, and that he would not again give cause for the repetition of the reproof; and that, as he had never been a communicant, were he to become one then it would be imputed to an ostentatious display of religious zeal? arising altogether from his elevated station. Accordingly, he never afterwards came on the morning of sacramental Sunday, though at other times he was a constant attendant in the morning'" (Annals of the American Pulpit, Vol. v, p. 394) http://www.lothropp.org...

The Rev. Dr. Wilson (1777-1859 ) in one of his famous sermons clearly states that Washington was not a Christian.
"When the war was over and the victory over our enemies won, and the blessings and happiness of liberty and peace were secured, the Constitution was framed and God was neglected. He was not merely forgotten. He was absolutely voted out of the Constitution. The proceedings, as published by Thompson, the secretary, and the history of the day, show that the question was gravely debated whether God should be in the Constitution or not, and, after a solemn debate he was deliberately voted out of it. ... There is not only in the theory of our government no recognition of God's laws and sovereignty, but its practical operation, its administration, has been conformable to its theory. Those who have been called to administer the government have not been men making any public profession of Christianity. ... Washington was a man of valor and wisdom. He was esteemed by the whole world as a great and good man; but he was not a professing Christian."


Washington kneeling at valley Forge in 1777 was a complete fabrication:
Weems wrote a story that supposedly took place at Valley Forge, when a Quaker named Potts was walking through the woods near Washington's headquarters and, as he told his wife, he saw "the commander in chief of the American armies on his knees in prayer!" Potts told her that this proved that Washington was a man of God and that God would therefore save America.(9)

"The Potts story has been the most cherished of all the anecdotes about Washington at prayer, though, interestingly, it was never alluded to by Quaker writers on Washington, no even by those of a 'Free Quaker' of nonpacifist persuasion. It has been repeated with countless variations since Weems first put it forward; scores of witnesses attesting to the event (many years later) have been dug up by champions of the story; and many details have been added by later writes to Weems's original account....

"The Valley Forge story is, of course, utterly without foundation in fact. There was indeed a Quaker farmer named Isaac Potts who came into possession of a house in Valley Forge toward the end of the Revolutionary War; but he was nowhere near Valley Forge in the winter of 1777 when Washington was supposed to have been praying in the snow. Nevertheless, Washington's 'Gethsemene,' as the Vall

Don't be so anti-God bruh
Welfare-Worker
Posts: 1,181
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2/15/2015 6:37:24 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 2/14/2015 9:10:27 PM, Varrack wrote:
Don't be so anti-God bruh

You need to see the difference between god and religion.

TJ may be of some help.

Thus in the spirit of the Enlightenment, he made the following recommendation to his nephew Peter Carr in 1787: "Question with boldness even the existence of God; because if there be one, he must more approve the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear."

He also rejected the idea of the divinity of Christ, but as he writes to William Short on October 31, 1819, he was convinced that the fragmentary teachings of Jesus constituted the "outlines of a system of the most sublime morality which has ever fallen from the lips of man."

["And the day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the supreme being as his father in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerve in the brain of Jupiter. But may we hope that the dawn of reason and freedom of thought in these United States will do away with this artificial scaffolding, and restore to us the primitive and genuine doctrines of this most venerated reformer of human errors."-Thomas Jefferson, Letter to John Adams, April 11, 1823].

That Jesus did not mean to impose himself on mankind as the son of God, physically speaking, I have been convinced by the writings of men more learned than myself in that lore. But that he might conscientiously believe himself inspired from above, is very possible...

But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.
-Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, 1782

Where the preamble declares, that coercion is a departure from the plan of the holy author of our religion, an amendment was proposed by inserting "Jesus Christ," so that it would read "A departure from the plan of Jesus Christ, the holy author of our religion;" the insertion was rejected by the great majority, in proof that they meant to comprehend, within the mantle of its protection, the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and Mohammedan, the Hindoo and Infidel of every denomination.
-Thomas Jefferson, Autobiography, in reference to the Virginia Act for Religious Freedom

Now, which of these is the true and charitable Christian? He who believes and acts on the simple doctrines of Jesus? Or the impious dogmatists, as Athanasius and Calvin? Verily I say these are the false shepherds foretold as to enter not by the door into the sheepfold, but to climb up some other way. They are mere usurpers of the Christian name, teaching a counter-religion made up of the deliria of crazy imaginations, as foreign from Christianity as is that of Mahomet. Their blasphemies have driven thinking men into infidelity, who have too hastily rejected the supposed author himself, with the horrors so falsely imputed to him. Had the doctrines of Jesus been preached always as pure as they came from his lips, the whole civilized world would now have been Christian. I rejoice that in this blessed country of free inquiry and belief, which has surrendered its creed and conscience to neither kings nor priests, the genuine doctrine of one only God is reviving, and I trust that there is not a young man now living in the United States who will not die an Unitarian.

~ ~
The Virginia Act For Establishing Religious Freedom

Thomas Jefferson, 1786

Well aware that Almighty God hath created the mind free; that all attempts to influence it by temporal punishments or burdens, or by civil incapacitations, tend only to beget habits of hypocrisy and meanness, and are a departure from the plan of the Holy Author of our religion, who being Lord both of body and mind, yet chose not to propagate it by coercions on either, as was in his Almighty power to do; that the impious presumption of legislators and rulers, civil as well as ecclesiastical, who, being themselves but fallible and uninspired men, have assumed dominion over the faith of others, setting up their own opinions and modes of thinking as the only true and infallible, and as such endeavoring to impose them on others, hath established and maintained false religions over the greatest part of the world, and through all time; that to compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves, is sinful and tyrannical; that even the forcing him to support this or that teacher of his own religious persuasion, is depriving him of the comfortable liberty of giving his contributions to the particular pastor whose morals he would make his pattern, and whose powers he feels most persuasive to righteousness, and is withdrawing from the ministry those temporal rewards, which proceeding from an approbation of their personal conduct, are an additional incitement to earnest and unremitting labors for the instruction of mankind; that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, more than our opinions in physics or geometry; that, therefore, the proscribing any citizen as unworthy the public confidence by laying upon him an incapacity of being called to the offices of trust and emolument, unless he profess or renounce this or that religious opinion, is depriving him injuriously of those privileges and advantages to which in common with his fellow citizens he has a natural right; that it tends also to corrupt the principles of that very religion it is meant to encourage, by bribing, with a monopoly of worldly honors and emoluments, those who will externally profess and conform to it; that though indeed these are criminal who do not withstand such temptation, yet neither are those innocent who lay the bait in their way; that to suffer the civil magistrate to intrude his powers into the field of opinion and to restrain the profession or propagation of principles, on the supposition of their ill tendency, is a dangerous fallacy, which at once destroys all religious liberty, because he being of course judge of that tendency, will make his opinions the rule of judgment, and approve or condemn the sentiments of others only as they shall square with or differ from his own; that it is time enough for the rightful purposes of civil government, for its officers to interfere when principles break out into overt acts against peace and good order; and finally, that truth is great and will prevail if left to herself, that she is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error, and has nothing to fear from the conflict, unless by human interposition disarmed of her natural weapons, free argument and debate, errors ceasing to be dangerous when it is permitted freely to contradict them.

Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly, That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burdened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in nowise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.
And though we well know this Assembly, elected by the people for the ordinary purposes of legislation only, have no powers equal to our own and that therefore to declare this act irrevocable would be of no effect in law, yet we are free to declare, and do declare, that the rights hereby asserted are of the natural rights of mankind, and that if any act shall be hereafter passed to repeal the present or to narrow its operation, such act will be an infringement of natural right.
omanjoka
Posts: 37
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3/12/2015 5:37:55 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 2/14/2015 3:28:17 AM, Bible-Prophecy wrote:
George Washington (1732-1799), was the 1st President of the United States.
George Washington said: "It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God
and the Bible."

Reference: America's God & Country Encyclopedia of Quotations, by William J. Federer,Page 660.


Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), was the 16th President of the United States of America.
He said: "I can see how it might be possible for a man to look down upon the earth and be an atheist,
But I cannot conceive how he could look up into the heavens and say there is no God."

Reference: http://thinkexist.com...


Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969), the 34th President of the United States.
Dwight David Eisenhower said: "Without God there could be no American form of government
nor an American way of life. Recognition of the Supreme Being is the first the most basic expression of Americanism."

Reference: http://thinkexist.com...

Understand this, most of the presidents were the least religious people in the world. They believed in a god, but always believed in a secular government. Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, George Washington, and Ab Lincoln were Deists. People who believed in a creator, but no personal god of any religion. Basically atheists of their time.
JFK was the first catholic president. While running, people feared that he would only listen to the pope. But he made sure everyone knew he was a supporter of a separation of church and state.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent.
Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent.
Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?"
-Epicurus.