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NYC to Close Schools for Muslim Holidays

Khaos_Mage
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3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.
My work here is, finally, done.
Khaos_Mage
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3/5/2015 12:01:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Huh. Well, this takes a little of the wind out of my sails.
http://schools.nyc.gov...

It appears they are closed for Jewish holidays as well.
I still disagree, but it is at least fairly applied.
My work here is, finally, done.
1harderthanyouthink
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3/5/2015 12:03:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

I think we can afford 2 days, one of which would affect summer school, for 10% of the population.
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Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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3/5/2015 12:38:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 12:03:53 PM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

I think we can afford 2 days, one of which would affect summer school, for 10% of the population.

The issue is principle, not affordability. If Christians were to drop below 12% of the populace, should we still have schools close for Good Friday, and have all the other people who don't celebrate it affected by having to take off work to watch their kids?
My work here is, finally, done.
Maikuru
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3/5/2015 12:41:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I agree with Khaos: we shouldn't be closing schools for any religious holidays.
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Vox_Veritas
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3/5/2015 1:00:09 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

This is a tricky issue.
No religion should be endorsed above all others by the school system. Thus, we shouldn't close schools for the holidays of one religion but not another.
Closing schools for all holidays of all religions would be a bit...ugh. Plus, that'd be endorsing religion in general over atheism.
On the other hand, a religion cannot be (whatever the opposite of endorse is). Also, religion in general cannot be (whatever the opposite of endorse is). Absence of the endorsement of religion must not result in the endorsement of atheism.
So, a person of a specific religion should be given an excused absence for the celebration of a major holiday of his/her religion.
Christmas is a bit different, though. Though technically a Christian holiday, these days probably Muslims and Atheists and Hindus in America celebrate the holiday, though with different meaning. Heck, probably half of the people who attend Mardi Gras parades aren't even Roman Catholic.
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Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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3/5/2015 1:01:24 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 12:41:36 PM, Maikuru wrote:
I agree with Khaos: we shouldn't be closing schools for any religious holidays.

You know that's not my position ;)
Religion and society go together, for better or worse, there is no denying it. Further, this is an issue with public schools, as they have to deal with the freedom of religion. As such, it makes sense for schools to close if there is a big enough reason. In that one district, 36% of students were absent on that holy day. If that is city wide, then I would not have a problem with it, as 1/3 is a significant amount. (I can only extrapolate data from data I have) However, if city-wide, the holy day is only 5-10% of students missing, I do not think that is enough to warrant a school closure.

There is a reason why Ash Wednesday is not closed, because even though most are Christians (I think), it is not celebrated or disruptive enough to warrant a day off, unlike Christmas (which has much secular emphasis as well).
My work here is, finally, done.
Khaos_Mage
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3/5/2015 1:10:51 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 1:00:09 PM, Vox_Veritas wrote:
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

This is a tricky issue.
No religion should be endorsed above all others by the school system. Thus, we shouldn't close schools for the holidays of one religion but not another.
Closing schools for all holidays of all religions would be a bit...ugh.
Exactly. So, the question is, is 10% enough of a disruption? Granted, part of my outrage was that I didn't think Jewish holidays were observed, and there are 3x more Jews than Muslims, but they are observed, so my outrage is nullified.
Plus, that'd be endorsing religion in general over atheism.
I don't care about atheists in this argument.
On the other hand, a religion cannot be (whatever the opposite of endorse is). Also, religion in general cannot be (whatever the opposite of endorse is). Absence of the endorsement of religion must not result in the endorsement of atheism.
Religious views affect student obligations, which is fine. The issue is when it reaches a point that the entire school needs to shut down to accommodate.
So, a person of a specific religion should be given an excused absence for the celebration of a major holiday of his/her religion.
I do not believe this was an issue before, nor should it be. It should be excused at the individual level.
Christmas is a bit different, though. Though technically a Christian holiday, these days probably Muslims and Atheists and Hindus in America celebrate the holiday, though with different meaning. Heck, probably half of the people who attend Mardi Gras parades aren't even Roman Catholic.
Which is why I haven't used it as an example, it is too commercial, secular, traditional, and cross-religious.
My work here is, finally, done.
HououinKyouma
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3/5/2015 4:30:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 12:38:27 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:03:53 PM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

I think we can afford 2 days, one of which would affect summer school, for 10% of the population.

The issue is principle, not affordability. If Christians were to drop below 12% of the populace, should we still have schools close for Good Friday, and have all the other people who don't celebrate it affected by having to take off work to watch their kids?

Why not just get rid of religious holidays? Wouldn't that be better? It would certainly be more secular.
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Maikuru
Posts: 9,112
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3/5/2015 4:34:20 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 1:01:24 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:41:36 PM, Maikuru wrote:
I agree with Khaos: we shouldn't be closing schools for any religious holidays.

You know that's not my position ;)
Religion and society go together, for better or worse, there is no denying it. Further, this is an issue with public schools, as they have to deal with the freedom of religion. As such, it makes sense for schools to close if there is a big enough reason. In that one district, 36% of students were absent on that holy day. If that is city wide, then I would not have a problem with it, as 1/3 is a significant amount. (I can only extrapolate data from data I have) However, if city-wide, the holy day is only 5-10% of students missing, I do not think that is enough to warrant a school closure.

There is a reason why Ash Wednesday is not closed, because even though most are Christians (I think), it is not celebrated or disruptive enough to warrant a day off, unlike Christmas (which has much secular emphasis as well).

You said that Muslim children need to learn to operate in a secular/Christian nation. It appears, at the very least, this school is making efforts to catch up with them. Rather than oppose it, why not embrace it?
"You assume I wouldn't want to burn this whole place to the ground."
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YYW
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3/5/2015 4:39:01 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

I don't see why this is a bad thing. I also think that kids should have regular breaks while in school; basically, if we can have MLK day off, I think religious holidays for major world religions (even if, for example, the percentage of students celebrating the holiday is less than 1%) should be observed by public schools.

Although, I don't think that school could reasonably close for the entire period of Ramadan.
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Envisage
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3/5/2015 5:17:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

Great, now all we need now is a closure day for Darwin day!
Khaos_Mage
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3/6/2015 9:03:39 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 4:30:27 PM, HououinKyouma wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:38:27 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:03:53 PM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

I think we can afford 2 days, one of which would affect summer school, for 10% of the population.

The issue is principle, not affordability. If Christians were to drop below 12% of the populace, should we still have schools close for Good Friday, and have all the other people who don't celebrate it affected by having to take off work to watch their kids?

Why not just get rid of religious holidays? Wouldn't that be better? It would certainly be more secular.

And secularists don't celebrate religious holidays, like Christmas?
I don't care to get rid of religious holidays in school, as they affect society, and disrupt education. The issue is, if 10% is a large enough disruption to warrant closing the school.
My work here is, finally, done.
Khaos_Mage
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3/6/2015 9:17:26 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 4:34:20 PM, Maikuru wrote:
At 3/5/2015 1:01:24 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:41:36 PM, Maikuru wrote:
I agree with Khaos: we shouldn't be closing schools for any religious holidays.

You know that's not my position ;)
Religion and society go together, for better or worse, there is no denying it. Further, this is an issue with public schools, as they have to deal with the freedom of religion. As such, it makes sense for schools to close if there is a big enough reason. In that one district, 36% of students were absent on that holy day. If that is city wide, then I would not have a problem with it, as 1/3 is a significant amount. (I can only extrapolate data from data I have) However, if city-wide, the holy day is only 5-10% of students missing, I do not think that is enough to warrant a school closure.

There is a reason why Ash Wednesday is not closed, because even though most are Christians (I think), it is not celebrated or disruptive enough to warrant a day off, unlike Christmas (which has much secular emphasis as well).

You said that Muslim children need to learn to operate in a secular/Christian nation. It appears, at the very least, this school is making efforts to catch up with them. Rather than oppose it, why not embrace it?

The purpose of school is to educate, and this can extend beyond the classroom. Closing for large disruptions is warranted, whether that be Christmas (religious or not, it is secular to have family vacations), a bomb threat, or snow emergency.

There is no reason why these Muslim children should be forced to attend school on these days. They should not fail a test or anything like that. However, is the disruption large enough to warrant the entire student body a day off, and the consequences that brings for families.

I don't see how this is "catching them up" at all. Muslims, like Jews, use a different calendar than "Americans" use. Imagine if you are at a job and you have a stock holder meeting the first Monday of July. However, this year, a religious holiday falls on it. Is the business going to say, "that's okay, we can reschedule"? Probably not, and you have an issue on your hands: work or reverence.
Speaking of religious holidays, I am not religious, but do you know how much income I have lost over the years because my employer decided to be closed on certain holidays, like Easter? Is that fair to me? Nope. But, I have to deal with, just like they do. They can't just stop a restaurant to pray, or be closed on Fridays.....unless the business lets them or is even designed around it (I know a Muslim dentist that is closed on Fridays).

So, losing a day of class while others are in school is practice for the real world, IMO.
Regardless, the core issue is, should a religious holiday be used to schedule the entire school off for such a small population? Or, is 10% high enough?
I doubt you would agree that a Rastafarian holiday or Tamil New Year should be recognized, given the small amount of disturbance.
Similarly, if a school district was 2% Christian, than Good Friday should not be observed. Ash Wednesday is not observed currently, after all.
My work here is, finally, done.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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3/6/2015 10:10:18 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 4:39:01 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

I don't see why this is a bad thing. I also think that kids should have regular breaks while in school; basically, if we can have MLK day off, I think religious holidays for major world religions (even if, for example, the percentage of students celebrating the holiday is less than 1%) should be observed by public schools.
So, how many Hindu holidays should be recognized? None are to my knowledge.
Regular breaks is not the issue here, nor is it that students cannot have the day off.
It is forcing the students to stay home and not have class for anyone, due to a small percentage of students due to their parents' religious festivities.

Although, I don't think that school could reasonably close for the entire period of Ramadan.
Exactly. The issue is reasonably.
I don't see why the school should be closed, and that has consequences outside of school, mind you, like family taking off work to watch their kids, if the benefit is so small.
My work here is, finally, done.
Maikuru
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3/6/2015 11:30:02 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/6/2015 9:17:26 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:

The purpose of school is to educate, and this can extend beyond the classroom. Closing for large disruptions is warranted, whether that be Christmas (religious or not, it is secular to have family vacations), a bomb threat, or snow emergency.

If the purpose of school is to education, then it shouldn't close for holidays. If a student wants to take a day off, take it off. The school should remain open and educate. Now, if you think schools are should close for holidays, then extending the holiday calendar to include the spectrum of religions is justified. Some percentile cutoff as to what should and should not be celebrated is arbitrary and inequitable.

I don't see how this is "catching them up" at all. Muslims, like Jews, use a different calendar than "Americans" use.

Many Americans are Muslim and Jewish.

Imagine if you are at a job and you have a stock holder meeting the first Monday of July. However, this year, a religious holiday falls on it. Is the business going to say, "that's okay, we can reschedule"? Probably not, and you have an issue on your hands: work or reverence.

So because some business may not accommodate some of these children in the future, the school should not accommodate them now? Because they may not always be treated fairly, they should never be treated fairly? Trust me, as minorities in this country, those children will quickly learn that not every place they visit will treat them with equity and respect. There is no reason to take away what little accommodation they are receiving now.

Speaking of religious holidays, I am not religious, but do you know how much income I have lost over the years because my employer decided to be closed on certain holidays, like Easter? Is that fair to me? Nope. But, I have to deal with, just like they do. They can't just stop a restaurant to pray, or be closed on Fridays.....unless the business lets them or is even designed around it (I know a Muslim dentist that is closed on Fridays).

Just as your employer has decided to close on certain dates, so has this school.

So, losing a day of class while others are in school is practice for the real world, IMO.
Regardless, the core issue is, should a religious holiday be used to schedule the entire school off for such a small population? Or, is 10% high enough?
I doubt you would agree that a Rastafarian holiday or Tamil New Year should be recognized, given the small amount of disturbance.
Similarly, if a school district was 2% Christian, than Good Friday should not be observed. Ash Wednesday is not observed currently, after all.

If schools are opening themselves up to religious interference, this is the consequence.
"You assume I wouldn't want to burn this whole place to the ground."
- lamerde

https://i.imgflip.com...
Warik
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3/6/2015 12:29:18 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

Ridiculous. Nobody should be given a free pass because of their religion
HououinKyouma
Posts: 1,030
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3/6/2015 3:31:09 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/6/2015 9:03:39 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 3/5/2015 4:30:27 PM, HououinKyouma wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:38:27 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:03:53 PM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

I think we can afford 2 days, one of which would affect summer school, for 10% of the population.

The issue is principle, not affordability. If Christians were to drop below 12% of the populace, should we still have schools close for Good Friday, and have all the other people who don't celebrate it affected by having to take off work to watch their kids?

Why not just get rid of religious holidays? Wouldn't that be better? It would certainly be more secular.

And secularists don't celebrate religious holidays, like Christmas?
I don't care to get rid of religious holidays in school, as they affect society, and disrupt education. The issue is, if 10% is a large enough disruption to warrant closing the school.

1) Some secularists do celebrate Christmas, but some don't. In any case, it would not be a problem because it coincides with winter break.

2) It seems to me that if you are going to celebrate holidays in schools by having
them close down during those holidays, you can't make exceptions, specially exceptions based on the low percentage of a particular religion--that would be a form of discrimination. Or at least, you can't make exceptions in those schools where the percentage of students of a religion that happens to be a minority in the state, or the nation at large, is actually quite large.
"Here the ways of men part: if you wish to strive for peace of soul and pleasure, then believe; if you wish to be a devotee of truth, then inquire." F. Nietzsche.

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wrichcirw
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3/7/2015 11:55:22 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/6/2015 9:03:39 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 3/5/2015 4:30:27 PM, HououinKyouma wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:38:27 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 3/5/2015 12:03:53 PM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
At 3/5/2015 11:52:21 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
http://schools.nyc.gov...
http://www.worldpopulationstatistics.com...

Ummmm, what?
I can understand an excused absence given to Muslims for honoring their holidays, just as I assume Jews would be allowed to due to observe Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana, or Chanukah. However, to close the entire school for a holiday that benefits between 2-10% of all citizens, seems downright unacceptable.

If nothing else, this is a learning experience for children to learn to operate in a largely secular/Christian nation. If you are going to be "different", there are consequences. In the "real world" (i.e. current American society), Muslims are not going to be afforded these considerations in 95+% of workplaces. They will have to use their vacation time, and catch up to business they missed. School should mimic this, IMO.

Now, if Muslims represented, say, 30%, this would be a fair discussion. 50% would be a reasonable discussion, but less than 12%, no.

I think we can afford 2 days, one of which would affect summer school, for 10% of the population.

The issue is principle, not affordability. If Christians were to drop below 12% of the populace, should we still have schools close for Good Friday, and have all the other people who don't celebrate it affected by having to take off work to watch their kids?

Why not just get rid of religious holidays? Wouldn't that be better? It would certainly be more secular.

And secularists don't celebrate religious holidays, like Christmas?

Hence the origin of the words "Happy Holidays!" and "Spring Break!" instead of Christmas and Easter.

I don't care to get rid of religious holidays in school, as they affect society, and disrupt education. The issue is, if 10% is a large enough disruption to warrant closing the school.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?