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Is gay marriage really about taxes?

xus00HAY
Posts: 1,395
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5/23/2015 9:24:40 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
If a well paid man is living with a woman who is a college student, he can marry her and claim her as an exemption on his income tax, .thus his income becomes the income of 2 people and less is taken from it in tax. All other things being equal, it might be claimed that this is not fair because the gay man must pay more tax because his sex partner is of the same sex.
Hillary Clinton's lesbian friends may have pointed this out to Mrs. Clinton.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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5/23/2015 9:37:11 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/23/2015 9:24:40 AM, xus00HAY wrote:
If a well paid man is living with a woman who is a college student, he can marry her and claim her as an exemption on his income tax, .thus his income becomes the income of 2 people and less is taken from it in tax. All other things being equal, it might be claimed that this is not fair because the gay man must pay more tax because his sex partner is of the same sex.
Hillary Clinton's lesbian friends may have pointed this out to Mrs. Clinton.

One can claim an exemption for anyone who lives with another, if they have no income.

A simpler argument, is that marriage has a different bracket, and if there is a large disparity in income, it is less of a tax burden to be married.
However, this is not always the case (there is the so-called marriage penalty).

For example, if a married couple had taxable income of $70K, the tax liability would be $9596.
If the taxable income would have been $20 and $50K the liability would have totalled $10,193, while if they both had taxable income of $35K, the liability would have totaled $9600 (i.e. no effective difference than if they were not married).
My work here is, finally, done.
xus00HAY
Posts: 1,395
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5/23/2015 12:57:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Ok, so say a Gay man who earns 50.000/yr. Lives with his kept boy who has a taxable income of 0. If the kept boy magically turned into a kept girl and they married he then claims her as an exemption and files jointly.
Notice how this question will not be given a straight answer and there will be no number posted.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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5/23/2015 2:24:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/23/2015 12:57:04 PM, xus00HAY wrote:
Ok, so say a Gay man who earns 50.000/yr. Lives with his kept boy who has a taxable income of 0. If the kept boy magically turned into a kept girl and they married he then claims her as an exemption and files jointly.
Notice how this question will not be given a straight answer and there will be no number posted.

Don't mince words when talking about laws or taxes.
Zero taxable income =/= zero income.
If the latter, the kept boy can still be claimed as an exemption, even though if they were married (and a girl) there would be the extra standard deduction (assuming this is used, and not itemized). So, there MAY be a better tax situation.
If only the former, it is more likely that they will break even, or close to it, given their income levels, married or not.
My work here is, finally, done.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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5/23/2015 2:59:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/23/2015 2:46:49 PM, xus00HAY wrote:
Well if they can't get a tax break, then why else would they marry?

First, I never said they can't get a tax break. I said it is not automatically better. I know people that would lose thousands in credits if they were married, and I know people that would be better off if they were married.
Second, there are plenty of reasons people get married. You can't be this dense to not be aware of spousal benefits, can you? Most notably, there is social security, survivorship, and spousal privilege.
My work here is, finally, done.