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Selecting a candidate for presidency

ben2974
Posts: 767
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6/29/2015 3:47:03 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
How do you go about in figuring out who to vote for in a run for office (state governor/presidency)?

Candidates, especially those who run for presidency, will have to hold positions on many issues. General categories include economics, cultural/social (which covers public policies ranging from abortion to gun control), and international relations (which covers international trade, war/military, foreign relations).

Do you focus on a few specific issues that hold personal importance (e.g, focus on civil rights, largely determining your vote)?
or
Do you assess a candidate in whole in a sort of cost/benefit analysis, seeing which candidate will provide the greatest net benefit to the national interest (all things accessed according to your viewpoints on issues, ofc).

I'm asking these questions because a friend of mine categorically rejects the republican platform on a single factor - the general conservative stance on social issues like gay marriage. Though I am a self-identified democrat, I defended republicans at large because I thought it was unfair to reject a republican on the basis of one or two related stances.
Contra
Posts: 3,941
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6/29/2015 4:30:00 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/29/2015 3:47:03 PM, ben2974 wrote:
How do you go about in figuring out who to vote for in a run for office (state governor/presidency)?

Candidates, especially those who run for presidency, will have to hold positions on many issues. General categories include economics, cultural/social (which covers public policies ranging from abortion to gun control), and international relations (which covers international trade, war/military, foreign relations).

Do you focus on a few specific issues that hold personal importance (e.g, focus on civil rights, largely determining your vote)?
or
Do you assess a candidate in whole in a sort of cost/benefit analysis, seeing which candidate will provide the greatest net benefit to the national interest (all things accessed according to your viewpoints on issues, ofc).

I'm asking these questions because a friend of mine categorically rejects the republican platform on a single factor - the general conservative stance on social issues like gay marriage. Though I am a self-identified democrat, I defended republicans at large because I thought it was unfair to reject a republican on the basis of one or two related stances.

I decide on the basis on several issues, namely government spending, taxes, and foreign policy. Their personality also matters to me, but to a lesser extent.
"The solution [for Republicans] is to admit that Bush was a bad president, stop this racist homophobic stuff, stop trying to give most of the tax cuts to the rich, propose a real alternative to Obamacare that actually works, and propose smart free market solutions to our economic problems." - Distraff

"Americans are better off in a dynamic, free-enterprise-based economy that fosters economic growth, opportunity and upward mobility." - Paul Ryan