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police with xray guns see what's in ur car

Sooner
Posts: 1,012
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8/16/2015 9:23:47 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
thefreethoughtproject.com/police-x-ray-guns-detect-drugs-guns-car

revenue collecting state enforcers will have the ability to see into your entire vehicle using a miniature x-ray gun." The gun is specifically designed to recognize guns and drugs, so police can have an easier time finding nonviolent offenders to put behind bars.

The device is being developed by an organization called the "American Science & Engineering Company"." The device has no official name but has been called the "Mini Z system" by those who are developing it.

The company has been working to develop this technology for over 7 years." The most difficult part about the creation of this weapon was scaling their x ray technology down to a handheld size.

Ironically, pro-police and pro-military blog "Defense One" pointed out that officers did not even need to be literate to operate this device.

AS&E CEO Chuck Dougherty told reporters that the Mini Z system is "a game-changer for law enforcement and border security officials who are constantly challenged to quickly and accurately detect potential threats in hard-to-reach environments."

Unfortunately the majority of people who are targeted with programs like this are actually nonviolent people who are not criminals." They do not deserve to be put in cages, and they do not deserve any fines.
Ignoring problems doesn't make them go away.
Barracuda
Posts: 7
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8/17/2015 2:56:42 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/16/2015 9:23:47 PM, Sooner wrote:
thefreethoughtproject.com/police-x-ray-guns-detect-drugs-guns-car

revenue collecting state enforcers will have the ability to see into your entire vehicle using a miniature x-ray gun." The gun is specifically designed to recognize guns and drugs, so police can have an easier time finding nonviolent offenders to put behind bars.

The device is being developed by an organization called the "American Science & Engineering Company"." The device has no official name but has been called the "Mini Z system" by those who are developing it.

The company has been working to develop this technology for over 7 years." The most difficult part about the creation of this weapon was scaling their x ray technology down to a handheld size.

Ironically, pro-police and pro-military blog "Defense One" pointed out that officers did not even need to be literate to operate this device.

AS&E CEO Chuck Dougherty told reporters that the Mini Z system is "a game-changer for law enforcement and border security officials who are constantly challenged to quickly and accurately detect potential threats in hard-to-reach environments."

Unfortunately the majority of people who are targeted with programs like this are actually nonviolent people who are not criminals." They do not deserve to be put in cages, and they do not deserve any fines.

You do know how unreliable a source the Free Thought Project is, right? Also who exactly are the "nonviolent people who aren't criminals" being "targeted" here?
katie.snappy
Posts: 108
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8/17/2015 2:58:03 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/17/2015 2:56:42 PM, Barracuda wrote:
You do know how unreliable a source the Free Thought Project is, right? Also who exactly are the "nonviolent people who aren't criminals" being "targeted" here?

Agreed. There are so many issues with the OP (unreliable source, unclear information...) that it's almost not even worth responding to.
Sooner
Posts: 1,012
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8/17/2015 4:41:57 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/17/2015 2:56:42 PM, Barracuda wrote:
At 8/16/2015 9:23:47 PM, Sooner wrote:
thefreethoughtproject.com/police-x-ray-guns-detect-drugs-guns-car

revenue collecting state enforcers will have the ability to see into your entire vehicle using a miniature x-ray gun." The gun is specifically designed to recognize guns and drugs, so police can have an easier time finding nonviolent offenders to put behind bars.

The device is being developed by an organization called the "American Science & Engineering Company"." The device has no official name but has been called the "Mini Z system" by those who are developing it.

The company has been working to develop this technology for over 7 years." The most difficult part about the creation of this weapon was scaling their x ray technology down to a handheld size.

Ironically, pro-police and pro-military blog "Defense One" pointed out that officers did not even need to be literate to operate this device.

AS&E CEO Chuck Dougherty told reporters that the Mini Z system is "a game-changer for law enforcement and border security officials who are constantly challenged to quickly and accurately detect potential threats in hard-to-reach environments."

Unfortunately the majority of people who are targeted with programs like this are actually nonviolent people who are not criminals." They do not deserve to be put in cages, and they do not deserve any fines.

You do know how unreliable a source the Free Thought Project is, right? Also who exactly are the "nonviolent people who aren't criminals" being "targeted" here?
----
I don't know the credibility of the source, but in an article from my home city's newspaper, our department admits to using a stingray device which mimics a cell phone tower, giving them access to all text messages within range of the tower which violates the 4th Amendment according to some. That's why an article such as this at least gets my attention. Just sayin.
Ignoring problems doesn't make them go away.
OberHerr
Posts: 13,062
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8/17/2015 4:47:11 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Geolaurate8 changed his account name?
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Official Enforcer for the DDO Elite(if they existed).

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Barracuda
Posts: 7
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8/17/2015 4:47:54 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/17/2015 4:41:57 PM, Sooner wrote:
At 8/17/2015 2:56:42 PM, Barracuda wrote:
At 8/16/2015 9:23:47 PM, Sooner wrote:
thefreethoughtproject.com/police-x-ray-guns-detect-drugs-guns-car

revenue collecting state enforcers will have the ability to see into your entire vehicle using a miniature x-ray gun." The gun is specifically designed to recognize guns and drugs, so police can have an easier time finding nonviolent offenders to put behind bars.

The device is being developed by an organization called the "American Science & Engineering Company"." The device has no official name but has been called the "Mini Z system" by those who are developing it.

The company has been working to develop this technology for over 7 years." The most difficult part about the creation of this weapon was scaling their x ray technology down to a handheld size.

Ironically, pro-police and pro-military blog "Defense One" pointed out that officers did not even need to be literate to operate this device.

AS&E CEO Chuck Dougherty told reporters that the Mini Z system is "a game-changer for law enforcement and border security officials who are constantly challenged to quickly and accurately detect potential threats in hard-to-reach environments."

Unfortunately the majority of people who are targeted with programs like this are actually nonviolent people who are not criminals." They do not deserve to be put in cages, and they do not deserve any fines.

You do know how unreliable a source the Free Thought Project is, right? Also who exactly are the "nonviolent people who aren't criminals" being "targeted" here?
----
I don't know the credibility of the source, but in an article from my home city's newspaper, our department admits to using a stingray device which mimics a cell phone tower, giving them access to all text messages within range of the tower which violates the 4th Amendment according to some. That's why an article such as this at least gets my attention. Just sayin.

Well here is the thing. In order to make a case for or against something as complex as law enforcement practices you need information. These things aren't just developed and used willy-nilly. Policies have to be drafted, vetted, and implemented before hand. An actual program must be established with distinct and detailed goals, procedures, and fail safes. We need to know what triggered the development of these technologies, who commissioned them, why, when, what they are going to be used for and how they are going to be used. If you don't have that information, then you simply cannot have a solidly based opinion on them.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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8/17/2015 5:56:00 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/17/2015 4:47:54 PM, Barracuda wrote:

Well here is the thing. In order to make a case for or against something as complex as law enforcement practices you need information. These things aren't just developed and used willy-nilly. Policies have to be drafted, vetted, and implemented before hand. An actual program must be established with distinct and detailed goals, procedures, and fail safes. We need to know what triggered the development of these technologies, who commissioned them, why, when, what they are going to be used for and how they are going to be used. If you don't have that information, then you simply cannot have a solidly based opinion on them.

No, we don't need to know that. It's pretty simple:
By using this thing, police should be able to tell if people have a weapon. Very nice to know, but impractical in its usage.
What the OP fears is it will be used to quick search for drugs in cars, violating the 4th amendment rights. While there is already court precedent in cases similar to this AGAINST this type of usage, what good would it be? A quick search for drugs if they have reason to search.....or, a quick search to fabricate a reason for a search.

I think this is overall a good thing for police to have, but is largely going to be unused.
My work here is, finally, done.
Barracuda
Posts: 7
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8/17/2015 9:58:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/17/2015 5:56:00 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 8/17/2015 4:47:54 PM, Barracuda wrote:

Well here is the thing. In order to make a case for or against something as complex as law enforcement practices you need information. These things aren't just developed and used willy-nilly. Policies have to be drafted, vetted, and implemented before hand. An actual program must be established with distinct and detailed goals, procedures, and fail safes. We need to know what triggered the development of these technologies, who commissioned them, why, when, what they are going to be used for and how they are going to be used. If you don't have that information, then you simply cannot have a solidly based opinion on them.

No, we don't need to know that. It's pretty simple:
By using this thing, police should be able to tell if people have a weapon. Very nice to know, but impractical in its usage.
What the OP fears is it will be used to quick search for drugs in cars, violating the 4th amendment rights. While there is already court precedent in cases similar to this AGAINST this type of usage, what good would it be? A quick search for drugs if they have reason to search.....or, a quick search to fabricate a reason for a search.

I think this is overall a good thing for police to have, but is largely going to be unused.

At a glance, yes it seems that you are right. But honestly there are way too many questions unanswered before one can honestly form an opinion. Will these "x-Ray" guns be standard issue for every street cop? Or are they a federal measure that will be issued to select agencies? If they are indeed something that is coming to state and local police forces, then who exactly is heading this? PDs in America are very compartmentalized. Is this NYPD developing it to scan cars in a suspicious neigborhood or is it LAPD developing it for checkpoint use? The bottom line is that there are too many unknowns to form a working argument for or against these "x-Ray guns". As for OP's concerns, then perhaps they have already been addressed and made irrelevant by one of the aforementioned unknowns.
Barracuda
Posts: 7
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8/17/2015 10:00:16 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/17/2015 5:56:00 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 8/17/2015 4:47:54 PM, Barracuda wrote:

Well here is the thing. In order to make a case for or against something as complex as law enforcement practices you need information. These things aren't just developed and used willy-nilly. Policies have to be drafted, vetted, and implemented before hand. An actual program must be established with distinct and detailed goals, procedures, and fail safes. We need to know what triggered the development of these technologies, who commissioned them, why, when, what they are going to be used for and how they are going to be used. If you don't have that information, then you simply cannot have a solidly based opinion on them.

No, we don't need to know that. It's pretty simple:
By using this thing, police should be able to tell if people have a weapon. Very nice to know, but impractical in its usage.
What the OP fears is it will be used to quick search for drugs in cars, violating the 4th amendment rights. While there is already court precedent in cases similar to this AGAINST this type of usage, what good would it be? A quick search for drugs if they have reason to search.....or, a quick search to fabricate a reason for a search.

I think this is overall a good thing for police to have, but is largely going to be unused.

Not to mention that this is all coming from the Free Thought Project, who's liberal bias is so severe that it honestly renders anything they say worthless.
MakeSensePeopleDont
Posts: 1,106
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8/20/2015 2:14:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Yeah, I've already seen this and similar technologies. What you fail to address is the fact that congress and privacy advocacy groups have already made it abundantly clear that use of this device and others like it will be restricted under the 4th Amendment. Meaning, anywhere your eyes cannot go, while standing in public areas, the devices cannot go. warrants, owners consent or probable cause are required for legal search and seizure.