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Opinions of Jeremy Corbyn

beng100
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9/8/2015 6:08:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Jeremy Corbyn, a career politician with the Labour party known for his far left socialist values looks set to be elected Labour's leader in a few days time. Corbyn struggled to get sufficient nominations from mps to run in the contest but managed to pursuade some of his fellow socialists to nominate him in order to widen the debate. He was 100-1 with some bookmakers at the start of the contest. Amazingly though Labour's core supporters seem to like him, and many more people have joined the party in recent months as you only need to pay "3 to get a vote in the election. It is generally thought a man who suggests rises in government spending, a new tax for land owners, a new mansion tax and inheritance tax increases will alienate Britain's centrist voters and combined with plans to renationalize many competitive industries and his known links to hezbullah and Hamas he will consign Labour to a heavy defeat. Like many right wing voters I'm hoping he is elected as leader as I'm confident the British people would never be stupid enough to let him walk Into downing street! Anyone disagree?
ErenBalkir
Posts: 157
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9/8/2015 6:20:46 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 6:08:50 PM, beng100 wrote:
Jeremy Corbyn, a career politician with the Labour party known for his far left socialist values looks set to be elected Labour's leader in a few days time. Corbyn struggled to get sufficient nominations from mps to run in the contest but managed to pursuade some of his fellow socialists to nominate him in order to widen the debate. He was 100-1 with some bookmakers at the start of the contest. Amazingly though Labour's core supporters seem to like him, and many more people have joined the party in recent months as you only need to pay "3 to get a vote in the election. It is generally thought a man who suggests rises in government spending, a new tax for land owners, a new mansion tax and inheritance tax increases will alienate Britain's centrist voters and combined with plans to renationalize many competitive industries and his known links to hezbullah and Hamas he will consign Labour to a heavy defeat. Like many right wing voters I'm hoping he is elected as leader as I'm confident the British people would never be stupid enough to let him walk Into downing street! Anyone disagree?

I disagree with him on many things but I also agree with him on a lot as well. I agree we should nationalize infrastructure (railways) but disagree with nationalizing royal mail again. I like his ideas for greater democracy in the labour party and his republicanism but don't like his foreign policy, complete nuclear disarmament and leaving NATO. I like his stance on greater equality and a crackdown on tax evasion but I don't like his lingering attachment to the word "socialism" which he always defends. I also don't like his rhetoric about the government investing in private industry itself (how is unclear) , It is a bit like the days of Harold Wilson!
beng100
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9/8/2015 6:48:43 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 6:20:46 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 6:08:50 PM, beng100 wrote:
Jeremy Corbyn, a career politician with the Labour party known for his far left socialist values looks set to be elected Labour's leader in a few days time. Corbyn struggled to get sufficient nominations from mps to run in the contest but managed to pursuade some of his fellow socialists to nominate him in order to widen the debate. He was 100-1 with some bookmakers at the start of the contest. Amazingly though Labour's core supporters seem to like him, and many more people have joined the party in recent months as you only need to pay "3 to get a vote in the election. It is generally thought a man who suggests rises in government spending, a new tax for land owners, a new mansion tax and inheritance tax increases will alienate Britain's centrist voters and combined with plans to renationalize many competitive industries and his known links to hezbullah and Hamas he will consign Labour to a heavy defeat. Like many right wing voters I'm hoping he is elected as leader as I'm confident the British people would never be stupid enough to let him walk Into downing street! Anyone disagree?

I disagree with him on many things but I also agree with him on a lot as well. I agree we should nationalize infrastructure (railways) but disagree with nationalizing royal mail again. I like his ideas for greater democracy in the labour party and his republicanism but don't like his foreign policy, complete nuclear disarmament and leaving NATO. I like his stance on greater equality and a crackdown on tax evasion but I don't like his lingering attachment to the word "socialism" which he always defends. I also don't like his rhetoric about the government investing in private industry itself (how is unclear) , It is a bit like the days of Harold Wilson!

Im guessing you are a labour party supporter? Are you hoping he wins the leadership contest? Yes he is comparable to Harold Wilson. How do you think nationalizing the railways would improve things? Yes Corbyn is a true socialist and often harks on about it.
ErenBalkir
Posts: 157
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9/8/2015 7:00:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 6:48:43 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 6:20:46 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 6:08:50 PM, beng100 wrote:
Jeremy Corbyn, a career politician with the Labour party known for his far left socialist values looks set to be elected Labour's leader in a few days time. Corbyn struggled to get sufficient nominations from mps to run in the contest but managed to pursuade some of his fellow socialists to nominate him in order to widen the debate. He was 100-1 with some bookmakers at the start of the contest. Amazingly though Labour's core supporters seem to like him, and many more people have joined the party in recent months as you only need to pay "3 to get a vote in the election. It is generally thought a man who suggests rises in government spending, a new tax for land owners, a new mansion tax and inheritance tax increases will alienate Britain's centrist voters and combined with plans to renationalize many competitive industries and his known links to hezbullah and Hamas he will consign Labour to a heavy defeat. Like many right wing voters I'm hoping he is elected as leader as I'm confident the British people would never be stupid enough to let him walk Into downing street! Anyone disagree?

I disagree with him on many things but I also agree with him on a lot as well. I agree we should nationalize infrastructure (railways) but disagree with nationalizing royal mail again. I like his ideas for greater democracy in the labour party and his republicanism but don't like his foreign policy, complete nuclear disarmament and leaving NATO. I like his stance on greater equality and a crackdown on tax evasion but I don't like his lingering attachment to the word "socialism" which he always defends. I also don't like his rhetoric about the government investing in private industry itself (how is unclear) , It is a bit like the days of Harold Wilson!

Im guessing you are a labour party supporter? Are you hoping he wins the leadership contest? Yes he is comparable to Harold Wilson. How do you think nationalizing the railways would improve things? Yes Corbyn is a true socialist and often harks on about it.

Yes I am a labour supporter and although I wouldn't be too sad if he won, I would rather cooper win. My view on nationalization is simple and very common - Only nationalize if there is no way of having competition. In the case of infrastructure like the railways, you can't have competition on a single train track, it is a monopoly. I would rather have a government monopoly than a private one.
Emilrose
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9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.
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beng100
Posts: 1,055
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9/8/2015 7:15:19 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 7:00:04 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 6:48:43 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 6:20:46 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 6:08:50 PM, beng100 wrote:
Jeremy Corbyn, a career politician with the Labour party known for his far left socialist values looks set to be elected Labour's leader in a few days time. Corbyn struggled to get sufficient nominations from mps to run in the contest but managed to pursuade some of his fellow socialists to nominate him in order to widen the debate. He was 100-1 with some bookmakers at the start of the contest. Amazingly though Labour's core supporters seem to like him, and many more people have joined the party in recent months as you only need to pay "3 to get a vote in the election. It is generally thought a man who suggests rises in government spending, a new tax for land owners, a new mansion tax and inheritance tax increases will alienate Britain's centrist voters and combined with plans to renationalize many competitive industries and his known links to hezbullah and Hamas he will consign Labour to a heavy defeat. Like many right wing voters I'm hoping he is elected as leader as I'm confident the British people would never be stupid enough to let him walk Into downing street! Anyone disagree?

I disagree with him on many things but I also agree with him on a lot as well. I agree we should nationalize infrastructure (railways) but disagree with nationalizing royal mail again. I like his ideas for greater democracy in the labour party and his republicanism but don't like his foreign policy, complete nuclear disarmament and leaving NATO. I like his stance on greater equality and a crackdown on tax evasion but I don't like his lingering attachment to the word "socialism" which he always defends. I also don't like his rhetoric about the government investing in private industry itself (how is unclear) , It is a bit like the days of Harold Wilson!

Im guessing you are a labour party supporter? Are you hoping he wins the leadership contest? Yes he is comparable to Harold Wilson. How do you think nationalizing the railways would improve things? Yes Corbyn is a true socialist and often harks on about it.

Yes I am a labour supporter and although I wouldn't be too sad if he won, I would rather cooper win. My view on nationalization is simple and very common - Only nationalize if there is no way of having competition. In the case of infrastructure like the railways, you can't have competition on a single train track, it is a monopoly. I would rather have a government monopoly than a private one.

I think Cooper is a marginally better candidate, but unfortunately for her the stigma of the association with ed balls although not her fault will likely hinder her in winning both the leadership contest and a possible general election. In my opinion Andy Burnham is the strongest candidate for Labour to increase your chances of winning the election. As a conservative supporter I would be most concerned about him as his policies would be quite far to the left but his image and debating abilities could see him convince enough of the centre ground to vote for him. Liz Kendall is a weak candidate but her policies would be best for the country. Corbyn guarenteed you election defeat I think. I would compare it to the conservatives somehow appointing Nigel farage. Both seem okay to the left and right respectively but would alienate key voters and guarantee election defeat. I question the logic behind supporting Corbyn. I suppose people hope he can cause a big shift in British politics. Personally I think a system with tenders is best for the rail service. With the government able to issue fined for poor performance.
beng100
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9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician. Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.
ErenBalkir
Posts: 157
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9/8/2015 7:54:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician. Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

He offers greater democracy, reduced inequality and political change. He has one of the lowest expenditure claims of any MP!
Emilrose
Posts: 2,479
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9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.
Commentator on a picture with David Cameron and a Cat: 'Amazing what you can achieve with photoshop these days. I'm sure that used to be a pig.'

Commentator on Hillary Clinton: 'If Clinton is now what passes for progressive, maybe this country deserves Trump.'

Commentator on British parliament: 'All that talent in one place, where is Ebola when you need it?'

John Kerry on words: 'These aren't just words, folks.'
beng100
Posts: 1,055
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9/8/2015 8:37:37 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 7:54:39 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician. Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

He offers greater democracy, reduced inequality and political change. He has one of the lowest expenditure claims of any MP!

I agree he lives modestly and wouldent con the taxpayer or try to avoid taxes. He is a good citizen. How will he reduce inequality though? Raising taxes and increasing spending? It's not good economics. In my opinion the first priority has to be the national debt. It is dangerously high. Greece tried to give people better lives by spending beyond its means. It lead to financial ruin and ultimately much worse austerity then if they had begun dealing with the problem 10 years earlier. Equality is something to be sought after but I think it's tough to achieve without causing severe economic damage. I don't see how Corbyn offers political change, He is taking Labour back to the turmoil of the 1980s. How will he offer greater democracy?
beng100
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9/8/2015 8:44:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics. is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

My definition of a career politician is classed as if the person in question has worked in other non political positions, eg. banker, entreupreneur, lawyer. Real life experience outside of politics. Unfortunately few politicians seem to have significant careers before entering politics. Are you a labour party supporter? I notice you are jewish so I would imagine you are concerned by his links to hamas and hezbullah and plans for a one state solution for israelis and palestinians
ErenBalkir
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9/8/2015 8:45:17 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 8:37:37 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:54:39 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician. Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

He offers greater democracy, reduced inequality and political change. He has one of the lowest expenditure claims of any MP!

I agree he lives modestly and wouldent con the taxpayer or try to avoid taxes. He is a good citizen. How will he reduce inequality though? Raising taxes and increasing spending? It's not good economics. In my opinion the first priority has to be the national debt. It is dangerously high. Greece tried to give people better lives by spending beyond its means. It lead to financial ruin and ultimately much worse austerity then if they had begun dealing with the problem 10 years earlier. Equality is something to be sought after but I think it's tough to achieve without causing severe economic damage. I don't see how Corbyn offers political change, He is taking Labour back to the turmoil of the 1980s. How will he offer greater democracy?

The IMF and world bank have said the one thing slowing down growth the most is inequality. Reducing it through higher taxes and higher welfare will actually grow the economy (again not me but the rather conservative IMF and world bank) . Do you disagree with them?

It is very wrong of you to compare greece with the UK. We are not at risk of defaulting! The one thing we should aim for is reducing our debt as a percentage of GDP. Even with no cuts whatsoever, we would still have that percentage falling and so the whole purpose of austerity is made redundant.

Corbyn will ensure all policy decisions are made by popular vote in the labour party and not by the leader. In the long run this may be very beneficial to the party.

He will never win the 2020 election, england is too conservative (sadly) and he is slightly too left wing (sadly) but that doesn't mean the things he is saying about inequality, democracy and the railways are wrong
ErenBalkir
Posts: 157
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9/8/2015 8:47:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

On your profile it says you are from spain, then how do you know so much about british politics?
beng100
Posts: 1,055
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9/8/2015 9:11:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 8:45:17 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:37:37 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:54:39 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician. Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

He offers greater democracy, reduced inequality and political change. He has one of the lowest expenditure claims of any MP!

I agree he lives modestly and wouldent con the taxpayer or try to avoid taxes. He is a good citizen. How will he reduce inequality though? Raising taxes and increasing spending? It's not good economics. In my opinion the first priority has to be the national debt. It is dangerously high. Greece tried to give people better lives by spending beyond its means. It lead to financial ruin and ultimately much worse austerity then if they had begun dealing with the problem 10 years earlier. Equality is something to be sought after but I think it's tough to achieve without causing severe economic damage. I don't see how Corbyn offers political change, He is taking Labour back to the turmoil of the 1980s. How will he offer greater democracy?

The IMF and world bank have said the one thing slowing down growth the most is inequality. Reducing it through higher taxes and higher welfare will actually grow the economy (again not me but the rather conservative IMF and world bank) . Do you disagree with them?

It is very wrong of you to compare greece with the UK. We are not at risk of defaulting! The one thing we should aim for is reducing our debt as a percentage of GDP. Even with no cuts whatsoever, we would still have that percentage falling and so the whole purpose of austerity is made redundant.

Corbyn will ensure all policy decisions are made by popular vote in the labour party and not by the leader. In the long run this may be very beneficial to the party.

He will never win the 2020 election, england is too conservative (sadly) and he is slightly too left wing (sadly) but that doesn't mean the things he is saying about inequality, democracy and the railways are wrong

I agree a country that is more equal is a good thing for its citizens. However I personally have a very gloomy view about the economy. I think that government spending is too high and tax returns are too low. I believe the debt needs to be reduced significantly. It is too high. I believe that the continuation of borrowing at the rate we are currently could lead to a Greece like scenario in the long term (10-20 years), we need to learn from their mistakes and take action now. I believe tax rises are needed as well as spending decreases. The whole world has too much debt so it's not just a UK problem. I think that the next recession/ financial crash will lead to some major countries and banks going bankrupt. We need to ensure we are not one of those countries. Jeremy Corbyn presents a big risk to the economy. His populist policies like taxing banks would lead to a mass exodus, huge job losses and a reduction in tax revenues. Taxing landowners would result in farming becoming unviable, farmers going bankrupt, land prices falling, banks left with land that does not cover the money owed on it. Bank needs to borrow money to offset loss. I think if he was in power for 5 years it may genuinely lead to the doomsday Greece scenario.
Emilrose
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9/9/2015 10:11:18 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 8:47:02 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

On your profile it says you are from spain, then how do you know so much about british politics?

Am living in England now. Besides that I have an interest in British politics.
Commentator on a picture with David Cameron and a Cat: 'Amazing what you can achieve with photoshop these days. I'm sure that used to be a pig.'

Commentator on Hillary Clinton: 'If Clinton is now what passes for progressive, maybe this country deserves Trump.'

Commentator on British parliament: 'All that talent in one place, where is Ebola when you need it?'

John Kerry on words: 'These aren't just words, folks.'
Emilrose
Posts: 2,479
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9/9/2015 11:03:28 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 8:44:21 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics. is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

My definition of a career politician is classed as if the person in question has worked in other non political positions, eg. banker, entreupreneur, lawyer. Real life experience outside of politics. Unfortunately few politicians seem to have significant careers before entering politics.

In that case your definition is incorrect. A career politician is largely classified as someone who has 'no significant professional experience outside of the political arena.'

Not someone who in fact does have significant professional experience outside of politics.

As with the meaning I attached to it, it can also be used as a term to suggest a politician may be corrupt and/or overly ambitious. In the sense of placing their career before anything else--like personal ideology.

Are you a labour party supporter? I notice you are jewish so I would imagine you are concerned by his links to hamas and hezbullah and plans for a one state solution for israelis and palestinians

No, I don't support any parties and consider myself politically moderate.
As for Israel, his views (to me) are not particularly concerning. Actually I don't necessarily disagree with someone who's prepared to challenge their attitude towards the Palestinians *or* the way they've dealt with the conflict. His main point about a one-state solution is that the situation as it currently stands is not really sustainable. Israel rejects both two-states and one-state, which doesn't exactly leave any potential for long-term progression.

Additionally I also think he makes valid points on the rest of the Middle East, specifically in terms of not taking military action against countries such as Syria. That may be just another reason Labour supporters will vote for him.
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ErenBalkir
Posts: 157
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9/9/2015 2:22:48 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 10:11:18 AM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:47:02 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

On your profile it says you are from spain, then how do you know so much about british politics?

Am living in England now. Besides that I have an interest in British politics.

Why anyone would want to live here I don't know! After university I will definitely leave
ErenBalkir
Posts: 157
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9/9/2015 2:32:17 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 9:11:27 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:45:17 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:37:37 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:54:39 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician. Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

He offers greater democracy, reduced inequality and political change. He has one of the lowest expenditure claims of any MP!

I agree he lives modestly and wouldent con the taxpayer or try to avoid taxes. He is a good citizen. How will he reduce inequality though? Raising taxes and increasing spending? It's not good economics. In my opinion the first priority has to be the national debt. It is dangerously high. Greece tried to give people better lives by spending beyond its means. It lead to financial ruin and ultimately much worse austerity then if they had begun dealing with the problem 10 years earlier. Equality is something to be sought after but I think it's tough to achieve without causing severe economic damage. I don't see how Corbyn offers political change, He is taking Labour back to the turmoil of the 1980s. How will he offer greater democracy?

The IMF and world bank have said the one thing slowing down growth the most is inequality. Reducing it through higher taxes and higher welfare will actually grow the economy (again not me but the rather conservative IMF and world bank) . Do you disagree with them?

It is very wrong of you to compare greece with the UK. We are not at risk of defaulting! The one thing we should aim for is reducing our debt as a percentage of GDP. Even with no cuts whatsoever, we would still have that percentage falling and so the whole purpose of austerity is made redundant.

Corbyn will ensure all policy decisions are made by popular vote in the labour party and not by the leader. In the long run this may be very beneficial to the party.

He will never win the 2020 election, england is too conservative (sadly) and he is slightly too left wing (sadly) but that doesn't mean the things he is saying about inequality, democracy and the railways are wrong

I agree a country that is more equal is a good thing for its citizens. However I personally have a very gloomy view about the economy. I think that government spending is too high and tax returns are too low. I believe the debt needs to be reduced significantly. It is too high. I believe that the continuation of borrowing at the rate we are currently could lead to a Greece like scenario in the long term (10-20 years), we need to learn from their mistakes and take action now. I believe tax rises are needed as well as spending decreases. The whole world has too much debt so it's not just a UK problem. I think that the next recession/ financial crash will lead to some major countries and banks going bankrupt. We need to ensure we are not one of those countries. Jeremy Corbyn presents a big risk to the economy. His populist policies like taxing banks would lead to a mass exodus, huge job losses and a reduction in tax revenues. Taxing landowners would result in farming becoming unviable, farmers going bankrupt, land prices falling, banks left with land that does not cover the money owed on it. Bank needs to borrow money to offset loss. I think if he was in power for 5 years it may genuinely lead to the doomsday Greece scenario.

You say you want tax increases, but you criticize Jeremy for plans to raise taxes. Technically, he would reduce the deficit just as fast as the conservatives!

We will not default on our debt as long as we have two things. 1. a continuously falling debt as a percentage of GDP ratio and 2. enough confidence from banks to loan us money. Both of these things we have and I see no reason why it would change.

I would strongly recommend that you read up about "fractional reserve banking". Even those on the right such as douglas carswell have problems with it and so do the greens. It is the whole reason we have so much debt in our economy.

Briefly, it is that private banks can create money but that money is paired with debt. If everyone paid off all their debt, 97% of the money supply would be destroyed. Therefore, for the economy to work (in this system anyway), we all need to be in debt to banks. If you think I am making this up, I am not!

Those on the left share your worries about debt but the cause isn't government taxes or spending but "fractional reserve banking"
TN05
Posts: 4,492
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9/9/2015 2:50:47 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
As someone who isn't from the UK, his campaign is laughable. I hope he wins so Labour splits.
OracleNot
Posts: 8
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9/9/2015 3:07:00 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 8:37:37 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:54:39 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician. Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

He offers greater democracy, reduced inequality and political change. He has one of the lowest expenditure claims of any MP!

I agree he lives modestly and wouldent con the taxpayer or try to avoid taxes. He is a good citizen. How will he reduce inequality though? Raising taxes and increasing spending? It's not good economics. In my opinion the first priority has to be the national debt. It is dangerously high. Greece tried to give people better lives by spending beyond its means. It lead to financial ruin and ultimately much worse austerity then if they had begun dealing with the problem 10 years earlier. Equality is something to be sought after but I think it's tough to achieve without causing severe economic damage. I don't see how Corbyn offers political change, He is taking Labour back to the turmoil of the 1980s. How will he offer greater democracy?
Please explain, "Good Economics"
OracleNot
Posts: 8
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9/9/2015 3:15:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 2:50:47 PM, TN05 wrote:
As someone who isn't from the UK, his campaign is laughable. I hope he wins so Labour splits.
I suggest, with respect and if you are interested, that you read the odd history book about the Labour movement in the United kingdom and you may then have a better understanding of where his ideas and policy suggestions come from.
I think you will find that the party is already split after "New Labour" came about. What you will be witnessing in the next few days and weeks ahead are real labour voters taking back the party that the working class of the United kingdom fought so hard for. I hope this is of some help to you?
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
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9/9/2015 3:21:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/8/2015 6:08:50 PM, beng100 wrote:
Jeremy Corbyn, a career politician with the Labour party known for his far left socialist values

I don't need to read any further, and haven't. I hate this guy.

looks set to be elected Labour's leader in a few days time. Corbyn struggled to get sufficient nominations from mps to run in the contest but managed to pursuade some of his fellow socialists to nominate him in order to widen the debate. He was 100-1 with some bookmakers at the start of the contest. Amazingly though Labour's core supporters seem to like him, and many more people have joined the party in recent months as you only need to pay "3 to get a vote in the election. It is generally thought a man who suggests rises in government spending, a new tax for land owners, a new mansion tax and inheritance tax increases will alienate Britain's centrist voters and combined with plans to renationalize many competitive industries and his known links to hezbullah and Hamas he will consign Labour to a heavy defeat. Like many right wing voters I'm hoping he is elected as leader as I'm confident the British people would never be stupid enough to let him walk Into downing street! Anyone disagree?
Emilrose
Posts: 2,479
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9/9/2015 4:13:28 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 2:22:48 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 10:11:18 AM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:47:02 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

On your profile it says you are from spain, then how do you know so much about british politics?

Am living in England now. Besides that I have an interest in British politics.

Why anyone would want to live here I don't know! After university I will definitely leave

Money, that's why. Likewise I also want to move again once I have earned some.
Commentator on a picture with David Cameron and a Cat: 'Amazing what you can achieve with photoshop these days. I'm sure that used to be a pig.'

Commentator on Hillary Clinton: 'If Clinton is now what passes for progressive, maybe this country deserves Trump.'

Commentator on British parliament: 'All that talent in one place, where is Ebola when you need it?'

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ErenBalkir
Posts: 157
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9/9/2015 4:17:08 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 4:13:28 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/9/2015 2:22:48 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 10:11:18 AM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:47:02 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

On your profile it says you are from spain, then how do you know so much about british politics?

Am living in England now. Besides that I have an interest in British politics.

Why anyone would want to live here I don't know! After university I will definitely leave

Money, that's why. Likewise I also want to move again once I have earned some.

Fair enough. Where are you staying? London presumably
beng100
Posts: 1,055
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9/9/2015 4:22:09 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 3:07:00 PM, OracleNot wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:37:37 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:54:39 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician. Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

He offers greater democracy, reduced inequality and political change. He has one of the lowest expenditure claims of any MP!

I agree he lives modestly and wouldent con the taxpayer or try to avoid taxes. He is a good citizen. How will he reduce inequality though? Raising taxes and increasing spending? It's not good economics. In my opinion the first priority has to be the national debt. It is dangerously high. Greece tried to give people better lives by spending beyond its means. It lead to financial ruin and ultimately much worse austerity then if they had begun dealing with the problem 10 years earlier. Equality is something to be sought after but I think it's tough to achieve without causing severe economic damage. I don't see how Corbyn offers political change, He is taking Labour back to the turmoil of the 1980s. How will he offer greater democracy?
Please explain, "Good Economics"

In my opinion good economics is having a government system that is in positive credit and receiving more in taxes then it spends. Spending more than you receive eventually results in bankruptcy. Many left wing voters believe raising taxes is the answer to allow for increases in government spending. . France created a new 70% income tax bracket and all it achieved was pressurising rich people, banks, multinational companies and even ordinary French people to leave the country. As much as everybody can crititisize the rich elite, we need them to stay in the country or we will get nothing off them at all. Therefore increasing taxes will only result in lower tax revenue. I believe creating employment, dealing with unemployment and improving education are important ways to increase tax revenue. The most important thing in my view is to clamp down on tax avoidance and eliminate the tax loopholes.
beng100
Posts: 1,055
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9/9/2015 4:49:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 11:03:28 AM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:44:21 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics. is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

My definition of a career politician is classed as if the person in question has worked in other non political positions, eg. banker, entreupreneur, lawyer. Real life experience outside of politics. Unfortunately few politicians seem to have significant careers before entering politics.

In that case your definition is incorrect. A career politician is largely classified as someone who has 'no significant professional experience outside of the political arena.'

Not someone who in fact does have significant professional experience outside of politics.

As with the meaning I attached to it, it can also be used as a term to suggest a politician may be corrupt and/or overly ambitious. In the sense of placing their career before anything else--like personal ideology.

Are you a labour party supporter? I notice you are jewish so I would imagine you are concerned by his links to hamas and hezbullah and plans for a one state solution for israelis and palestinians

No, I don't support any parties and consider myself politically moderate.
As for Israel, his views (to me) are not particularly concerning. Actually I don't necessarily disagree with someone who's prepared to challenge their attitude towards the Palestinians *or* the way they've dealt with the conflict. His main point about a one-state solution is that the situation as it currently stands is not really sustainable. Israel rejects both two-states and one-state, which doesn't exactly leave any potential for long-term progression.

Additionally I also think he makes valid points on the rest of the Middle East, specifically in terms of not taking military action against countries such as Syria. That may be just another reason Labour supporters will vote for him.

Personally I don't see any major differences in both of our descriptions of career politicians. He has worked in politics for 44 years. The only previous job he has held not associated with politics is a brief period working for a district health authority. I can't really see how any of his other activities are disassociated with politics. Are there some things he has done that I haven't heard about?
Emilrose
Posts: 2,479
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9/9/2015 5:02:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 4:17:08 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 4:13:28 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/9/2015 2:22:48 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 10:11:18 AM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:47:02 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

On your profile it says you are from spain, then how do you know so much about british politics?

Am living in England now. Besides that I have an interest in British politics.

Why anyone would want to live here I don't know! After university I will definitely leave

Money, that's why. Likewise I also want to move again once I have earned some.

Fair enough. Where are you staying? London presumably

Naw, south-west ;)
Commentator on a picture with David Cameron and a Cat: 'Amazing what you can achieve with photoshop these days. I'm sure that used to be a pig.'

Commentator on Hillary Clinton: 'If Clinton is now what passes for progressive, maybe this country deserves Trump.'

Commentator on British parliament: 'All that talent in one place, where is Ebola when you need it?'

John Kerry on words: 'These aren't just words, folks.'
ErenBalkir
Posts: 157
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9/9/2015 5:12:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 5:02:38 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/9/2015 4:17:08 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 4:13:28 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/9/2015 2:22:48 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 10:11:18 AM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:47:02 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

On your profile it says you are from spain, then how do you know so much about british politics?

Am living in England now. Besides that I have an interest in British politics.

Why anyone would want to live here I don't know! After university I will definitely leave

Money, that's why. Likewise I also want to move again once I have earned some.

Fair enough. Where are you staying? London presumably

Naw, south-west ;)

oh, I live in Bath, near Bristol.
Emilrose
Posts: 2,479
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9/9/2015 5:27:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/9/2015 5:12:29 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 5:02:38 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/9/2015 4:17:08 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 4:13:28 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/9/2015 2:22:48 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/9/2015 10:11:18 AM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 8:47:02 PM, ErenBalkir wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:55:31 PM, Emilrose wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:29:40 PM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/8/2015 7:00:11 PM, Emilrose wrote:
Hm, I disagree with much of his views and think his politics is outdated--however I wouldn't necessarily say that he's a 'career politician'. Partly why he's received this popularity among Labour supporters is because he's quite the opposite. To them, he's a refreshing change from previous Labour leaders.

He began his political career at the age of 25 so I would personally class that as being a career politician.

That still doesn't really coincide with my definition of 'career politician'. Despite beginning his career at age 25, he's never actually held any major positions and has very limited qualification(s) for actually being Labour leader. As well as that, he's clearly the type to prioritise ideology over ambition; which has been pointed out by some political commentators.

Not neccecarily a bad thing and that is not my reason for believing he would be an awful prime minister. I would say he is a step backwards for Labour to the days of Michael foot and Neil Kinnock. What does he really offer that's new and exciting? I think the reason for Labour supporters backing him is his stance against austerity and plans to increase taxes and increase spending.

I agree, his policies are ultimately unrealistic and nothing he has is new or different but unfortunately a fair number of Labour supporters are not interpreting it that way--especially younger ones.

On your profile it says you are from spain, then how do you know so much about british politics?

Am living in England now. Besides that I have an interest in British politics.

Why anyone would want to live here I don't know! After university I will definitely leave

Money, that's why. Likewise I also want to move again once I have earned some.

Fair enough. Where are you staying? London presumably

Naw, south-west ;)

oh, I live in Bath, near Bristol.

Oh nice...I lived there for a while as a child actually. Now am in Gloucestershire.
Commentator on a picture with David Cameron and a Cat: 'Amazing what you can achieve with photoshop these days. I'm sure that used to be a pig.'

Commentator on Hillary Clinton: 'If Clinton is now what passes for progressive, maybe this country deserves Trump.'

Commentator on British parliament: 'All that talent in one place, where is Ebola when you need it?'

John Kerry on words: 'These aren't just words, folks.'