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Mass Shootings; American Culture is Diseased.

jat93
Posts: 1,440
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10/2/2015 8:19:13 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I think American culture is just diseased.

Seems to me that most of these mass shootings are from young people. Young men in particular. Could it be that young people across the country are feeling lonely, alienated, cynical, insecure, and desperate? Could it be perhaps that we as a culture and a country have failed our young people in some profound way.

The power of the gun lobby? Of course that has something to do with it. So does the amount of guns around the USA (roughly 300 million). Somewhere in the mix, interpretations of the 2nd amendment play a role in preventing the necessary social reform. But the "politics of guns" is just a symptom of a larger issue, namely the plight of young Americans. Liberals & conservatives battle over guns, not realizing trends of mass violence are symptoms of an even worse social disease.

Mass shootings have to be understood along with the defining socio-economic story of the last 40 years, characterized by:

- stagnant wages for the vast majority of American workers;
- the proliferation of massive systematic inequalities of wealth;
- the rising price of basic living necessities;
- increased work productivity with decreased benefits;
- a dysfunctional political system increasingly corrupted by the role of Big Money.

This is the society our young people are currently inheriting. I think the rise of mass shootings absolutely has something to do with these economic insecurities. Moreover, these economic insecurities can lead to mental health issues -- and mental health issues can exist independently of economic status, as well. Either way, our national methods of dealing with mental health are shamefully f*cked. Combined with grim economic fortunes, we're pretty much begging young people to go insane.

Pity our youth -- they inherited this disgusting garbage culture, but they weren't the ones who created it. And then, if you're swayed, consider how we can A) pass sensible gun regulation B) reform our mental health system C) help millennials overcome their economic plight 40 years in the making.
Midnight1131
Posts: 1,643
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10/2/2015 3:01:49 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/2/2015 8:19:13 AM, jat93 wrote:
I think American culture is just diseased.

Seems to me that most of these mass shootings are from young people. Young men in particular. Could it be that young people across the country are feeling lonely, alienated, cynical, insecure, and desperate? Could it be perhaps that we as a culture and a country have failed our young people in some profound way.

I wouldn't generalize the whole demographic, mass shootings like this aren't common enough to assume that all young people have problems.

Mass shootings have to be understood along with the defining socio-economic story of the last 40 years, characterized by:

- stagnant wages for the vast majority of American workers;
- the proliferation of massive systematic inequalities of wealth;
- the rising price of basic living necessities;
- increased work productivity with decreased benefits;
- a dysfunctional political system increasingly corrupted by the role of Big Money.

Are you trying to say that mass shootings are influenced by economic conditions? Because most shooters, include yesterday's shooter were influenced by religious or racist thoughts, or mental health issues, but not economic conditions.

Pity our youth -- they inherited this disgusting garbage culture, but they weren't the ones who created it.

If you're referring to the economic conditions, wealth inequality is in almost every country. The economic conditions aren't the problem here.

A) pass sensible gun regulation
More background checks.
#GaryJohnson2016
#TaxationisTheft
#TheftisTaxation
Mr_Anderson
Posts: 116
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10/3/2015 2:39:24 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/2/2015 3:01:49 PM, Midnight1131 wrote:
At 10/2/2015 8:19:13 AM, jat93 wrote:
I think American culture is just diseased.

Seems to me that most of these mass shootings are from young people. Young men in particular. Could it be that young people across the country are feeling lonely, alienated, cynical, insecure, and desperate? Could it be perhaps that we as a culture and a country have failed our young people in some profound way.

I wouldn't generalize the whole demographic, mass shootings like this aren't common enough to assume that all young people have problems.

Mass shootings have to be understood along with the defining socio-economic story of the last 40 years, characterized by:

- stagnant wages for the vast majority of American workers;
- the proliferation of massive systematic inequalities of wealth;
- the rising price of basic living necessities;
- increased work productivity with decreased benefits;
- a dysfunctional political system increasingly corrupted by the role of Big Money.

Are you trying to say that mass shootings are influenced by economic conditions? Because most shooters, include yesterday's shooter were influenced by religious or racist thoughts, or mental health issues, but not economic conditions.

Pity our youth -- they inherited this disgusting garbage culture, but they weren't the ones who created it.

If you're referring to the economic conditions, wealth inequality is in almost every country. The economic conditions aren't the problem here.

A) pass sensible gun regulation
More background checks.

What do you mean more? "More" background checks wouldn't do anything. A more thorough check that has accurate and up-to-date records instead of the dinosaur we have, that's available to use by civilians, is what we need.
omanjoka
Posts: 37
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10/3/2015 10:09:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/2/2015 8:19:13 AM, jat93 wrote:
I think American culture is just diseased.
I think the cure is a shot of some anti-bull sh*t ;)
Seems to me that most of these mass shootings are from young people. Young men in particular. Could it be that young people across the country are feeling lonely, alienated, cynical, insecure, and desperate? Could it be perhaps that we as a culture and a country have failed our young people in some profound way.
I agree that many of our young people are considered lost causes to many old people. Stereotyped as lazy, and disrespectful may cause them to act it. An environment where one can become insecure with finances, or confidences has potential to make dangerous people in the long run.
The power of the gun lobby? Of course that has something to do with it. So does the amount of guns around the USA (roughly 300 million). Somewhere in the mix, interpretations of the 2nd amendment play a role in preventing the necessary social reform. But the "politics of guns" is just a symptom of a larger issue, namely the plight of young Americans. Liberals & conservatives battle over guns, not realizing trends of mass violence are symptoms of an even worse social disease.

Mass shootings have to be understood along with the defining socio-economic story of the last 40 years, characterized by:

- stagnant wages for the vast majority of American workers;
- the proliferation of massive systematic inequalities of wealth;
- the rising price of basic living necessities;
- increased work productivity with decreased benefits;
- a dysfunctional political system increasingly corrupted by the role of Big Money.
Please note that many people ALSO do shootings out of a political ideology, tribalism, or anger. I don't hear about many homeless young people doing mass shootings.
This is the society our young people are currently inheriting. I think the rise of mass shootings absolutely has something to do with these economic insecurities. Moreover, these economic insecurities can lead to mental health issues -- and mental health issues can exist independently of economic status, as well. Either way, our national methods of dealing with mental health are shamefully f*cked. Combined with grim economic fortunes, we're pretty much begging young people to go insane.

Pity our youth -- they inherited this disgusting garbage culture, but they weren't the ones who created it. And then, if you're swayed, consider how we can

A) pass sensible gun regulation
No more Assault riffles, and better background checks.

B) reform our mental health system
Reform the whole healthcare system to a Medicare for all system.

C) help millennials overcome their economic plight 40 years in the making.
A minimum living wage to, end free trade deals that outsource jobs, and free public college.

This won't fix everything, it's just my opinion.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent.
Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent.
Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?"
-Epicurus.
dylancatlow
Posts: 12,255
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10/4/2015 4:15:54 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
If anything, the upswing in the number of school shootings reflects the increased social alienation that technology has brought, and the turn towards antidepressants. I doubt it has anything to do with economic concerns, as I imagine is obvious to anyone without an ideological ax to grind.
Devilry
Posts: 473
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10/4/2015 7:00:35 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Because economics plays no part whatsoever in creating social alienation.
: : : At 11/15/2016 6:22:17 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
: That's not racism. Thats economics.
ben2974
Posts: 767
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10/4/2015 7:46:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/2/2015 3:01:49 PM, Midnight1131 wrote:
At 10/2/2015 8:19:13 AM, jat93 wrote:
I think American culture is just diseased.

Seems to me that most of these mass shootings are from young people. Young men in particular. Could it be that young people across the country are feeling lonely, alienated, cynical, insecure, and desperate? Could it be perhaps that we as a culture and a country have failed our young people in some profound way.

I wouldn't generalize the whole demographic, mass shootings like this aren't common enough to assume that all young people have problems.

Mass shootings have to be understood along with the defining socio-economic story of the last 40 years, characterized by:

- stagnant wages for the vast majority of American workers;
- the proliferation of massive systematic inequalities of wealth;
- the rising price of basic living necessities;
- increased work productivity with decreased benefits;
- a dysfunctional political system increasingly corrupted by the role of Big Money.

Are you trying to say that mass shootings are influenced by economic conditions? Because most shooters, include yesterday's shooter were influenced by religious or racist thoughts, or mental health issues, but not economic conditions.

But don't you think that an economic condition can be a facilitator in developing these kinds of "personal" issues? Seems pretty correlative if you ask me.

Pity our youth -- they inherited this disgusting garbage culture, but they weren't the ones who created it.

If you're referring to the economic conditions, wealth inequality is in almost every country. The economic conditions aren't the problem here.

A) pass sensible gun regulation
More background checks.
dylancatlow
Posts: 12,255
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10/4/2015 7:54:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/4/2015 7:00:35 PM, Devilry wrote:
Because economics plays no part whatsoever in creating social alienation.

It can, but I see no reason to think it's been the deciding factor in any of the school shootings we've had. The reason you and the OP are concerned with economics is obvious: it gives you additional grounds on which to bash capitalism and advance your pre-existing political agenda. In other words, "see how bad the system is". I'm hardly in love with the system as it exists today, but I don't think it has anything to do (or very little) with school shootings. The best way to deal with this issue is to restrict the supply of guns and to provide adequate mental healthcare for those prone to this sort of thing.
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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10/4/2015 8:00:35 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/2/2015 8:19:13 AM, jat93 wrote:
I think American culture is just diseased.

Seems to me that most of these mass shootings are from young people. Young men in particular. Could it be that young people across the country are feeling lonely, alienated, cynical, insecure, and desperate? Could it be perhaps that we as a culture and a country have failed our young people in some profound way.

The power of the gun lobby? Of course that has something to do with it. So does the amount of guns around the USA (roughly 300 million). Somewhere in the mix, interpretations of the 2nd amendment play a role in preventing the necessary social reform. But the "politics of guns" is just a symptom of a larger issue, namely the plight of young Americans. Liberals & conservatives battle over guns, not realizing trends of mass violence are symptoms of an even worse social disease.

Mass shootings have to be understood along with the defining socio-economic story of the last 40 years, characterized by:

- stagnant wages for the vast majority of American workers;
- the proliferation of massive systematic inequalities of wealth;
- the rising price of basic living necessities;
- increased work productivity with decreased benefits;
- a dysfunctional political system increasingly corrupted by the role of Big Money.

This is the society our young people are currently inheriting. I think the rise of mass shootings absolutely has something to do with these economic insecurities. Moreover, these economic insecurities can lead to mental health issues -- and mental health issues can exist independently of economic status, as well. Either way, our national methods of dealing with mental health are shamefully f*cked. Combined with grim economic fortunes, we're pretty much begging young people to go insane.

Pity our youth -- they inherited this disgusting garbage culture, but they weren't the ones who created it. And then, if you're swayed, consider how we can A) pass sensible gun regulation B) reform our mental health system C) help millennials overcome their economic plight 40 years in the making.

Do you have any evidence at all that the proportion of such disturbed young people is actually lower in other countries?

That literally ought to be the beginning and the end of this argument.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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10/4/2015 8:03:18 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/2/2015 8:19:13 AM, jat93 wrote:
I think American culture is just diseased.

Seems to me that most of these mass shootings are from young people. Young men in particular. Could it be that young people across the country are feeling lonely, alienated, cynical, insecure, and desperate? Could it be perhaps that we as a culture and a country have failed our young people in some profound way.

The power of the gun lobby? Of course that has something to do with it. So does the amount of guns around the USA (roughly 300 million). Somewhere in the mix, interpretations of the 2nd amendment play a role in preventing the necessary social reform. But the "politics of guns" is just a symptom of a larger issue, namely the plight of young Americans. Liberals & conservatives battle over guns, not realizing trends of mass violence are symptoms of an even worse social disease.

Mass shootings have to be understood along with the defining socio-economic story of the last 40 years, characterized by:

- stagnant wages for the vast majority of American workers;
- the proliferation of massive systematic inequalities of wealth;
- the rising price of basic living necessities;
- increased work productivity with decreased benefits;
- a dysfunctional political system increasingly corrupted by the role of Big Money.

This is the society our young people are currently inheriting. I think the rise of mass shootings absolutely has something to do with these economic insecurities. Moreover, these economic insecurities can lead to mental health issues -- and mental health issues can exist independently of economic status, as well. Either way, our national methods of dealing with mental health are shamefully f*cked. Combined with grim economic fortunes, we're pretty much begging young people to go insane.

Pity our youth -- they inherited this disgusting garbage culture, but they weren't the ones who created it. And then, if you're swayed, consider how we can A) pass sensible gun regulation B) reform our mental health system C) help millennials overcome their economic plight 40 years in the making.

I also haven't spoken to you in years lol -- so how's life?
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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10/4/2015 8:08:57 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/4/2015 4:15:54 PM, dylancatlow wrote:
If anything, the upswing in the number of school shootings reflects the increased social alienation that technology has brought, and the turn towards antidepressants. I doubt it has anything to do with economic concerns, as I imagine is obvious to anyone without an ideological ax to grind.

where's the evidence for any of that?.... I feel like people are using these incidents to vindicate their social perspectives, by characterizing it as a symptom for whatever ails they imagine pervade society --- regardless of whether or not they've actually rigorously investigated the existence of any causal connection or at the very least shown evidence of likelihood.

A fruitful discussion of what is causing these people to act as they do should begin with whether or not such people are actually uniquely prevalent in America or if you want, western and technologically advanced nations.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
dylancatlow
Posts: 12,255
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10/4/2015 10:35:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/4/2015 8:08:57 PM, 000ike wrote:
At 10/4/2015 4:15:54 PM, dylancatlow wrote:
If anything, the upswing in the number of school shootings reflects the increased social alienation that technology has brought, and the turn towards antidepressants. I doubt it has anything to do with economic concerns, as I imagine is obvious to anyone without an ideological ax to grind.

where's the evidence for any of that?.... I feel like people are using these incidents to vindicate their social perspectives, by characterizing it as a symptom for whatever ails they imagine pervade society --- regardless of whether or not they've actually rigorously investigated the existence of any causal connection or at the very least shown evidence of likelihood.

A fruitful discussion of what is causing these people to act as they do should begin with whether or not such people are actually uniquely prevalent in America or if you want, western and technologically advanced nations.

The evidence for antidepressants being a factor is pretty straightforward: spree killers are far more likely to be taking antidepressants than the average person. It's well known that antidepressants can lead to a host of behavioral and phycological problems, especially suicidal tendencies (and going on a killing spree fits right into that category).

The evidence for technology as a factor is equally simple. It's widely accepted that technology has disrupted normal human interactions. The average teenager spends a great deal of time internet, and often this gets in the way of forming meaningful relationships, which obviously can lead to feelings of isolation. With very few exceptions, spree killers feel isolated and ostracized.
Midnight1131
Posts: 1,643
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10/5/2015 6:24:35 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/4/2015 7:46:39 PM, ben2974 wrote:
At 10/2/2015 3:01:49 PM, Midnight1131 wrote:
At 10/2/2015 8:19:13 AM, jat93 wrote:
I think American culture is just diseased.

Seems to me that most of these mass shootings are from young people. Young men in particular. Could it be that young people across the country are feeling lonely, alienated, cynical, insecure, and desperate? Could it be perhaps that we as a culture and a country have failed our young people in some profound way.

I wouldn't generalize the whole demographic, mass shootings like this aren't common enough to assume that all young people have problems.

Mass shootings have to be understood along with the defining socio-economic story of the last 40 years, characterized by:

- stagnant wages for the vast majority of American workers;
- the proliferation of massive systematic inequalities of wealth;
- the rising price of basic living necessities;
- increased work productivity with decreased benefits;
- a dysfunctional political system increasingly corrupted by the role of Big Money.

Are you trying to say that mass shootings are influenced by economic conditions? Because most shooters, include yesterday's shooter were influenced by religious or racist thoughts, or mental health issues, but not economic conditions.

But don't you think that an economic condition can be a facilitator in developing these kinds of "personal" issues? Seems pretty correlative if you ask me.

There's a chance that it's one of the factors, but you can't tie in mass shootings with only a bad economy, and assume that there wouldn't be any mass shootings if America was in a better economic situation.
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#TaxationisTheft
#TheftisTaxation