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How did you choose your political ideolgy?

Todd0611
Posts: 99
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10/6/2015 6:20:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I'm glad that people have different viewpoints on almost every topic, but I'd like to know how many of you came to your "side" in politics. Was it because your parents taught you, or gave you choices. Was it a high school teacher, or college professor who influenced your viewpoints? Did you read/research on your own as you got older, did world events help form your opinion, or did you have a personal experience that drove you towards a specific ideology?

My parents were Republican, and so as a kid I naturally leaned that way, but my grandpa was in a union in Indiana, and he was a hard Democrat...which always made for interesting discussions at family gatherings. It probably wasn't until college, when I first started reading/researching to form my own opinion. My values were shaped by my parents, but I differ with them to this day on some issues. I've voted for both parties, and some independents in some of the smaller races. My father taught me to take the time to go through the candidates, see what they stand for, and look at their records. My parents are in their 70's, so they will never agree with me about marijuana legalization (I am for it), but I credit them with encouraging me to get my own information and not just rely on the TV.
Bu
Posts: 2
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10/8/2015 2:47:11 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
My father past away when I was young and my mom can barely speak English. I've lived in two states which happen to be astronomically democratic majority, and yet I'm Republican. I just influenced myself.
1harderthanyouthink
Posts: 13,102
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10/8/2015 4:25:35 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I came to it myself.
"It's awfully considerate of you to think of me here,
And I'm much obliged to you for making it clear - that I'm not here."

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briantheliberal
Posts: 722
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10/8/2015 6:24:02 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/6/2015 6:20:30 PM, Todd0611 wrote:
I'm glad that people have different viewpoints on almost every topic, but I'd like to know how many of you came to your "side" in politics. Was it because your parents taught you, or gave you choices. Was it a high school teacher, or college professor who influenced your viewpoints? Did you read/research on your own as you got older, did world events help form your opinion, or did you have a personal experience that drove you towards a specific ideology?

My parents were Republican, and so as a kid I naturally leaned that way, but my grandpa was in a union in Indiana, and he was a hard Democrat...which always made for interesting discussions at family gatherings. It probably wasn't until college, when I first started reading/researching to form my own opinion. My values were shaped by my parents, but I differ with them to this day on some issues. I've voted for both parties, and some independents in some of the smaller races. My father taught me to take the time to go through the candidates, see what they stand for, and look at their records. My parents are in their 70's, so they will never agree with me about marijuana legalization (I am for it), but I credit them with encouraging me to get my own information and not just rely on the TV.

I did not necessary "choose" my political ideology, it simply came naturally with knowledge and experience. I believe in what it is right, not preserving the status quo when it is convenient for me. I guess part of what influenced my ideology was constantly dealing with irrational and bigoted people in my life. They taught me what NOT to believe in. I know what it is like to be the underdog in society and my goal is to dismantle unequal power structures that set us apart. I see what is destructive and I oppose it. Over time I eventually realized my viewpoints were considered "liberal" because people who called themselves "conservative" would use that term against me as an insult for believing in the good things they considered bad, so I took pride and embraced the term. If being a liberal means believing in and fighting for justice, equality, and not holding onto bronze-aged worldviews that only hinder progress in the world, then I am proud to be one.

My family shaped my worldview, but vaguely. They taught me that humans were not set apart or considered inherently inferior because of concepts like race or sexual orientation, but they also made sure I realized that things weren't equal for everyone in the world, instead of ignoring and pretending they were. However, discussions of political matters was not very common for me and I still observed some "conservative" leaning attitudes in my family as well.

As I matriculated through high school I started doing a lot of research and reading about political issues. When I went to college, I took many courses in a wide array of subjects that really opened my mind. It is amazing what education can do for those who pursue it. I focused heavily on issues like gay marriage, abortion, and race. I weighed the outcomes, and analyzed the viewpoints of both sides, and came to the most logical conclusions.
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
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10/8/2015 8:45:27 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I became a Democrat when I was young. I asked my dad what the difference between Republican and Democrat was, and he told me Democrats like poor people, and Republicans hate poor people. So I thought to myself, hey I'm poor. I guess that makes me a Democrat, if I'm ever rich I'll probably be a Democrat also, because hating poor people is a Dick move. I wasn't really interested in politics in a while, but I did eventually start reading some of Michael Moore's material. He'd say stuff like we should give money to the poor and other extremely simplistic statements, and I'd think to myself that sounds reasonable, but then I wanted to challenge my own beliefs and I'd notice that conservative arguments stood up to scrutiny better. Michael Moore would say give money to the poor and provide no premises, but I'd read read something on the conservative end that would show that thre are better solutions to mindlessly throwing money at things, and hoping problems go away. I noticed that the schools that spent the most money on students would have the worst performance by students. If Michael Moore (my hero) was right than the problems should disappear once you threw money at them.

I noticed that regulatory agencies were used by big businesses to squash out their competition, there was a revolving door between big Pharma and people in the FDA in charge of regulation. The effects of regulatory agencies seemed to be, making it impossible for a small company to cure things and having fewer people work on the problem.

Then after a while I got into th more philosophical arguments, and started to learn that besides being ineffective, mindlessly making the government bigger and having them throw money at problems, was unethical. I never actually ran into any intelligent Democrats before DDO, and I'd have no problem ripping a random Democrats arguments to shreds when I faced them in public. I still think their arguments are weak, though harder to defeat here. For example they'll argue for increasing the minimum wage and have all types of studies to back them up, but the studies only show the short term effects of such a policy change. The short term effects are obviously going to be better with such a short term boost, but I think the long term effects are detrimental. Increasing minimum wage now, might not do so much damage, but it certainly effects long term things, such as whether a corporation decides to build a factory here or in Mexico where they can get labor, over 50% off the retail value here. That's an effect that occurs, but is not immediately seen. Then you also have Republican solutions to problems with harmful short term effects, but great long term effects, and it's hard to show the great long term effects there. For example, abolishing the federal reserve would have some extremely detrimental short term effects. People would probably be literally dying in the streets at the effects of doing so, but taking the long view, over the course of merely a few hundred years, you'd see an incredible effect. The economy would be in the hands of the people, instead of a few shadowy figures, plotting in secret in smoke filled rooms, a handful of people with disproportionate amount of control over the globe.

Well I'm off on a tangent, I'm a Republican because their arguments have held more sway over me. If I was a policy maker. I might run as a member of either party, because I'm aware of the impatience of people and would not want to impose solutions that take decades to see positive effects from. Those effects are better, but too many idiots are short sighted, and grand strategyis not a term they're familiar with.
Red_Dirt
Posts: 54
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10/8/2015 6:42:08 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Three or four generations back, my people worked in the mills of New York, New Jersey and New England. Prior to that, they did the same thing in France and England. They created great wealth and had a hand in creating the great institutions of America. Several of them became well off, but it was a different kind of rich, as anyone will tell you. They were responsible caretakers, not showoffs. This all took place from pre-colonial era until around the Great Depression of the 1930's. I was raised on stories of how the working people banded together and seemed to always keep the factory owners on the brink of bankruptcy. Later, I would realize that those stories were about the Democratic Party organizing the workers to band together to both better themselves and take a greater share of the profits, what was left of them. As a teen, I was able to witness the same thing in the industrial midwest, with the same results, business constantly trying to survive by dodging the politics of "we are just as good as anyone else." We are seeing nothing new. The Democratic political machines invariably plunder the wealth of the city until there is not enough left for simple maintenance. The machine becomes desperate, as it is, today. They concoct incredible tales in order to wring every last dime out of the systems they have ruined. The rapid rise of socialism caught me by surprise; but then, I thought, "Of course."
Red_Dirt
Posts: 54
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10/8/2015 6:43:57 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Three or four generations back, my people worked in the mills of New York, New Jersey and New England. Prior to that, they did the same thing in France and England. They created great wealth and had a hand in creating the great institutions of America. Several of them became well off, but it was a different kind of rich, as anyone will tell you. They were responsible caretakers, not showoffs. This all took place from pre-colonial era until around the Great Depression of the 1930's. I was raised on stories of how the working people banded together and seemed to always keep the factory owners on the brink of bankruptcy. Later, I would realize that those stories were about the Democratic Party organizing the workers to band together to both better themselves and take a greater share of the profits, what was left of them. As a teen, I was able to witness the same thing in the industrial midwest, with the same results, business constantly trying to survive by dodging the politics of "we are just as good as anyone else." We are seeing nothing new. The Democratic political machines invariably plunder the wealth of the city until there is not enough left for simple maintenance. The machine becomes desperate, as it is, today. They concoct incredible tales in order to wring every last dime out of the systems they have ruined. At first, this rapid rise of socialism caught me by surprise; but then, I thought, "Of course."
Bob13
Posts: 710
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10/8/2015 10:42:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I read articles about the difference between conservatism and liberalism, and discovered that I had conservative views on nearly every issue. I also noticed how liberals claim to be fighting for equality, but they ironically support discriminatory practices such as affirmative action. I also noticed that liberals tend to value the lives of parents more than the lives of their children, which is reflected in their views on abortion and gay marriage.
I don't have a signature. :-)
TheProphett
Posts: 520
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10/8/2015 11:10:56 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
My dad is an outspoken critic of the current GOP party. Being raised by him, of course his opinions have had an influence on my own. Yet, he also instilled upon me an important aspect of my personality; forming conclusions based upon your own thoughts and reasoning. Recently, I have started to dig deep into the world of politics, and have found out that he is almost 100% right on topics. Common sense has dissuaded me from favoring the Republican Party. Their policies and ideals are stupid, considering the current time period we are in. Therefore, I am a hard-leaning leftist, and associate myself with the Democratic Party.

So step by step breakdown:
1. Impressions gained by listening to my dad talk.
2. Independent research on important topics.
3. Watching Fox News and observing the utter stupidity of modern Republicans.
4. After careful consideration and thought, I came up with my reasons.
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Emilrose
Posts: 2,479
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10/9/2015 10:42:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
How did I choose Zionism?

Because we Jews are the best!

No, on a serious note I simply don't have one; and I don't necessarily believe in adopting a firm ideology due to the fact it can lead to bias and lack of objectivity.

In fact there's both *good* and *bad* aspects to different ideologies so it's best to recognize that and have some kind of balance in your political beliefs.
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UtherPenguin
Posts: 3,684
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10/9/2015 11:22:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I used to be a liberal until I started learning more about politics/economics, it was then that I started leaning to the far left.
"Praise Allah."
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Black-Jesus
Posts: 60
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10/9/2015 11:56:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I was a Conservative Republican because my family was until I hit about 14 years old when I actually began to look into politics. Through the influence of books, debates with liberals and libertarians and a series of speeches and research, I came to have a mix of libertarian, liberal and conservative views on issues, that I change sometimes (but not very often). And I of course add new stances on new issues as they appear.
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Nivek
Posts: 242
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10/10/2015 2:28:53 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/8/2015 10:42:29 PM, Bob13 wrote:
I read articles about the difference between conservatism and liberalism, and discovered that I had conservative views on nearly every issue. I also noticed how liberals claim to be fighting for equality, but they ironically support discriminatory practices such as affirmative action. I also noticed that liberals tend to value the lives of parents more than the lives of their children, which is reflected in their views on abortion and gay marriage.

So? Several groups experience more discrimination than others. Should those oppressed simply 'get along' just to be more comfortable despite being sanctioned socially?
YYW
Posts: 36,391
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10/10/2015 2:41:33 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
There was a time when I was an ardent Republican. Then I became a libertarian. Then I became a centrist. Then I became a Democrat. Now, I'm more like Bernie Sanders.

The changes were gradual, and over a period of about seven years, starting when I was in high school, and ending with the year after I graduated from college.
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Lexus
Posts: 169
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10/10/2015 2:48:58 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/8/2015 10:42:29 PM, Bob13 wrote:
I read articles about the difference between conservatism and liberalism, and discovered that I had conservative views on nearly every issue. I also noticed how liberals claim to be fighting for equality, but they ironically support discriminatory practices such as affirmative action

I haven't met someone who was a liberal and was genuinely pro-AA.
Red_Dirt
Posts: 54
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10/17/2015 5:49:46 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/9/2015 10:42:32 PM, Emilrose wrote:
No, on a serious note I simply don't have one; and I don't necessarily believe in adopting a firm ideology due to the fact it can lead to bias and lack of objectivity.

You know, you are right about that. Not to mention inconvenience when actions and thoughts are based on a set of values, often called a morality.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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10/18/2015 1:19:13 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I was a liberal originally, then became a libertarian, now I'm a weird hybrid-cynic thing that I can't find a term for. Machiavelli's works resonate particularly well with me, and I'm also a full-blooded cultural relativist.

My best advice to 'choosing' a political ideology: if you think that you're 100% right, that you've 'seen the light', that you're a defender of reason against some seething irrational horde, then you're doing it wrong. Nobody knows everything about anything. Nobody is right 100% of the time. Vascillating wildly between radically different ideologies indicates a detachment from reality, not some sort of political epiphany. Stop. Ask yourself the hard questions. Stay humble about what you think that you know. And don't demonize the other side, because it is irrational to dismiss someone if you can't even hear them over the sound of your own self-congratulation.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Yassine
Posts: 2,617
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10/18/2015 2:21:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/18/2015 1:19:13 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
I was a liberal originally, then became a libertarian, now I'm a weird hybrid-cynic thing that I can't find a term for. Machiavelli's works resonate particularly well with me, and I'm also a full-blooded cultural relativist.

- Probably the only one around here, apart from me that is.

My best advice to 'choosing' a political ideology: if you think that you're 100% right, that you've 'seen the light', that you're a defender of reason against some seething irrational horde, then you're doing it wrong. Nobody knows everything about anything. Nobody is right 100% of the time. Vascillating wildly between radically different ideologies indicates a detachment from reality, not some sort of political epiphany. Stop. Ask yourself the hard questions. Stay humble about what you think that you know. And don't demonize the other side, because it is irrational to dismiss someone if you can't even hear them over the sound of your own self-congratulation.

- LOL! True.
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Bob13
Posts: 710
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10/30/2015 6:38:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/10/2015 2:28:53 AM, Nivek wrote:
At 10/8/2015 10:42:29 PM, Bob13 wrote:
I read articles about the difference between conservatism and liberalism, and discovered that I had conservative views on nearly every issue. I also noticed how liberals claim to be fighting for equality, but they ironically support discriminatory practices such as affirmative action. I also noticed that liberals tend to value the lives of parents more than the lives of their children, which is reflected in their views on abortion and gay marriage.

So? Several groups experience more discrimination than others. Should those oppressed simply 'get along' just to be more comfortable despite being sanctioned socially?
There will be no oppression if all races would finally be equal under the law.
I don't have a signature. :-)
Bob13
Posts: 710
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10/30/2015 6:39:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/10/2015 2:48:58 AM, Lexus wrote:
At 10/8/2015 10:42:29 PM, Bob13 wrote:
I read articles about the difference between conservatism and liberalism, and discovered that I had conservative views on nearly every issue. I also noticed how liberals claim to be fighting for equality, but they ironically support discriminatory practices such as affirmative action

I haven't met someone who was a liberal and was genuinely pro-AA.
I was just referring to the official liberal stance on the issue.
I don't have a signature. :-)