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Obama: Doctrine of Restraint

TheProphett
Posts: 520
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10/12/2015 10:51:07 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Recently I read this article [http://www.nytimes.com...] on the new york times. Do you think the author does a good job of analyzing the ups and downs of Obama's foreign policy, and why? Does America need to do more or less in exerting its power around the world.

Thoughts?
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TBR
Posts: 9,991
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10/12/2015 11:17:06 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/12/2015 10:51:07 PM, TheProphett wrote:
Recently I read this article [http://www.nytimes.com...] on the new york times. Do you think the author does a good job of analyzing the ups and downs of Obama's foreign policy, and why? Does America need to do more or less in exerting its power around the world.

Thoughts?

I will read the article, but we need to remove ourselves from the M.E. As much as possible.
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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10/13/2015 12:18:20 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Laughable. He does not have a doctrine of restraint.

He sent NATO drones into Libya and bombed Gaddafi which led to his brutal murder by Al Queda linked rebels supported by Hillary and the Obama regime.

He played a role in the ouster of Mubarak in Egypt. He armed the "Syrian rebels" which then became ISIS. He sent drone invasions into Yemen, Pakistan, & Somalia. What is this foreign policy of restraint they speak of?

Even worse, the article acknowledges the disaster in Libya and still managed to call his efforts restrained.
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