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SNP1
Posts: 2,406
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1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.
#TheApatheticNihilistPartyofAmerica
#WarOnDDO
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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1/26/2016 12:40:26 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM, SNP1 wrote:
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.
http://pseudolaw.com...
SNP1
Posts: 2,406
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1/26/2016 1:27:11 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 1/26/2016 12:40:26 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM, SNP1 wrote:
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.
http://pseudolaw.com...

This just makes it one website against another.

Each site has Supreme Court references and quotes (which, the fact that the US Supreme Court has made rulings means the 10th Amendment isn't as powerful for an argument).

This just makes it a question of which site is more reliable. I haven't heard of either until today, and so am unsure of which would be more reliable.
#TheApatheticNihilistPartyofAmerica
#WarOnDDO
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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1/26/2016 1:37:49 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 1/26/2016 1:27:11 AM, SNP1 wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:40:26 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM, SNP1 wrote:
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.
http://pseudolaw.com...

This just makes it one website against another.

Each site has Supreme Court references and quotes (which, the fact that the US Supreme Court has made rulings means the 10th Amendment isn't as powerful for an argument).

This just makes it a question of which site is more reliable. I haven't heard of either until today, and so am unsure of which would be more reliable.

Well, the first guy is link happy, but can't provide links to
"The following argument has been used in at least three states (Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia) as a legal brief to support a demand for dismissal of charges of "driving without a license.""

Where are these cases?
SNP1
Posts: 2,406
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1/26/2016 1:46:20 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 1/26/2016 1:37:49 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 1:27:11 AM, SNP1 wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:40:26 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM, SNP1 wrote:
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.
http://pseudolaw.com...

This just makes it one website against another.

Each site has Supreme Court references and quotes (which, the fact that the US Supreme Court has made rulings means the 10th Amendment isn't as powerful for an argument).

This just makes it a question of which site is more reliable. I haven't heard of either until today, and so am unsure of which would be more reliable.

Well, the first guy is link happy, but can't provide links to
"The following argument has been used in at least three states (Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia) as a legal brief to support a demand for dismissal of charges of "driving without a license.""

Where are these cases?

I do not know. This entire thing is new to me.
On one had, we have a brief with a lot of quotes from Supreme Court rulings, legal definitions, etc.
On the other hand, we have an article with Supreme Court rulings.

I see nothing to give either source more credibility than the other. It is something that I would love to know the answer to.
I did also get sent YouTube videos where the police have let people go due to the "Right to Travel". Thing is, a judge would be a more credible source than the police (as sadly, the police are not always too knowledgeable about the law).
#TheApatheticNihilistPartyofAmerica
#WarOnDDO
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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1/26/2016 1:51:56 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 1/26/2016 1:46:20 AM, SNP1 wrote:
At 1/26/2016 1:37:49 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 1:27:11 AM, SNP1 wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:40:26 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM, SNP1 wrote:
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.
http://pseudolaw.com...

This just makes it one website against another.

Each site has Supreme Court references and quotes (which, the fact that the US Supreme Court has made rulings means the 10th Amendment isn't as powerful for an argument).

This just makes it a question of which site is more reliable. I haven't heard of either until today, and so am unsure of which would be more reliable.

Well, the first guy is link happy, but can't provide links to
"The following argument has been used in at least three states (Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia) as a legal brief to support a demand for dismissal of charges of "driving without a license.""

Where are these cases?

I do not know. This entire thing is new to me.
On one had, we have a brief with a lot of quotes from Supreme Court rulings, legal definitions, etc.
On the other hand, we have an article with Supreme Court rulings.

I see nothing to give either source more credibility than the other. It is something that I would love to know the answer to.
I did also get sent YouTube videos where the police have let people go due to the "Right to Travel". Thing is, a judge would be a more credible source than the police (as sadly, the police are not always too knowledgeable about the law).

How about this lawyer?
http://www.avvo.com...

This sort of nonsense makes its way around facebook from time to time.
SNP1
Posts: 2,406
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1/26/2016 2:00:30 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 1/26/2016 1:51:56 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 1:46:20 AM, SNP1 wrote:
At 1/26/2016 1:37:49 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 1:27:11 AM, SNP1 wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:40:26 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM, SNP1 wrote:
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.
http://pseudolaw.com...

This just makes it one website against another.

Each site has Supreme Court references and quotes (which, the fact that the US Supreme Court has made rulings means the 10th Amendment isn't as powerful for an argument).

This just makes it a question of which site is more reliable. I haven't heard of either until today, and so am unsure of which would be more reliable.

Well, the first guy is link happy, but can't provide links to
"The following argument has been used in at least three states (Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia) as a legal brief to support a demand for dismissal of charges of "driving without a license.""

Where are these cases?

I do not know. This entire thing is new to me.
On one had, we have a brief with a lot of quotes from Supreme Court rulings, legal definitions, etc.
On the other hand, we have an article with Supreme Court rulings.

I see nothing to give either source more credibility than the other. It is something that I would love to know the answer to.
I did also get sent YouTube videos where the police have let people go due to the "Right to Travel". Thing is, a judge would be a more credible source than the police (as sadly, the police are not always too knowledgeable about the law).

How about this lawyer?
http://www.avvo.com...


This sort of nonsense makes its way around facebook from time to time.

That is a helpful step in figuring this out, but I wish it would address the evidence that is in the brief I linked.
He says that it has been ruled that driving is a privilege, but how the brief has it laid out, operation of a automobile is not necessarily driving but traveling (and that traveling is a right while driving is a privilege).

I am more along the lines that it isn't the case that one has the Right to Travel via automobile without license, but would wish for someone to respond to the brief (as it seems to lay out the evidence on that side of it better than anything).
#TheApatheticNihilistPartyofAmerica
#WarOnDDO
YYW
Posts: 36,391
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1/26/2016 4:26:53 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM, SNP1 wrote:
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.

There is a constitutional right to travel. That is significant because during the civil rights movement, courts were persuaded that hotels which discriminated against black patrons intruded on black American's right to travel, which courts regarded as "fundamental." (NOTE: "fundamental right" has a very specific, but very vague definition that is worth knowing but not relevant for our purposes here.)

However, everything contained in that blog... is insufficient to support the idea that states do not have a right to require "licensing" to operate cars on public roads. As a matter of policy, the issue becomes public safety. States have a right to pass laws to protect safety, and ensuring that all drivers are at least minimally competent to operate vehicles on public roads is rationally related to the accomplishment of that goal.

Requiring licenses does NOT offend the right to travel, because cars are but one of many methods by which transportation can occur. Consider, for example, planes, trains, taxis, subways, busses, boats, etc. Thus, the argument is very weak.... laughably weak, in fact.
Tsar of DDO
YYW
Posts: 36,391
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1/26/2016 4:29:00 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 1/26/2016 12:40:26 AM, TBR wrote:
At 1/26/2016 12:28:39 AM, SNP1 wrote:
A friend of mine linked me the following and asked my opinion on it. I do not have the best understanding of legal terms, court cases, etc.
I wish I did, and so I had to tell him to ask another person, but after reading it I was wondering if it is actually accurate.

http://www.lawfulpath.com...

I am skeptical of it, but very curious. Anyone who is more in the know, I would love to hear what you have to say.
http://pseudolaw.com...

The right to travel is a constitutional right, but it is irrelevant for the purpose of addressing whether states are within the scope of their legitimate authority to require that people who operate vehicles on public roads have state issued licenses for doing so.
Tsar of DDO