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Tribute to an unknown hero

dylancatlow
Posts: 13,035
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3/30/2016 6:54:19 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
On 27 October 1962, at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a Soviet submarine commander named Vasili Arkhipov was alone in countermanding an order to fire a nuclear torpedo on a fleet of American navy vessels, after the captain aboard falsely believed they were under attack and that war between the United States and the Soviet Union was possibly already underway. Soviet military protocol stipulated that all three officers aboard had to agree before such an action was to be taken. The other officer aboard wanted to go ahead with the captain's order, while Arkhipov was alone in dissenting. His decision is widely believed to have prevented a full out nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union. He's sometimes referred to as "The Man Who Saved the World."
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PetersSmith
Posts: 6,894
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3/30/2016 7:14:01 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/30/2016 6:54:19 PM, dylancatlow wrote:
On 27 October 1962, at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a Soviet submarine commander named Vasili Arkhipov was alone in countermanding an order to fire a nuclear torpedo on a fleet of American navy vessels, after the captain aboard falsely believed they were under attack and that war between the United States and the Soviet Union was possibly already underway. Soviet military protocol stipulated that all three officers aboard had to agree before such an action was to be taken. The other officer aboard wanted to go ahead with the captain's order, while Arkhipov was alone in dissenting. His decision is widely believed to have prevented a full out nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union. He's sometimes referred to as "The Man Who Saved the World."

I knew about this because I saw an article that detailed "histories closest calls".
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Greyparrot
Posts: 16,933
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3/31/2016 3:21:01 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/30/2016 6:54:19 PM, dylancatlow wrote:
On 27 October 1962, at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a Soviet submarine commander named Vasili Arkhipov was alone in countermanding an order to fire a nuclear torpedo on a fleet of American navy vessels, after the captain aboard falsely believed they were under attack and that war between the United States and the Soviet Union was possibly already underway. Soviet military protocol stipulated that all three officers aboard had to agree before such an action was to be taken. The other officer aboard wanted to go ahead with the captain's order, while Arkhipov was alone in dissenting. His decision is widely believed to have prevented a full out nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union. He's sometimes referred to as "The Man Who Saved the World."

http://www.pbs.org...
I find myself intrigued by your subvocal oscillations.
A singular development of cat communications
That obviates your basic hedonistic predilection,
For a rhythmic stroking of your fur to demonstrate affection.
Blade-of-Truth
Posts: 5,530
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3/31/2016 4:38:44 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/30/2016 6:54:19 PM, dylancatlow wrote:
On 27 October 1962, at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a Soviet submarine commander named Vasili Arkhipov was alone in countermanding an order to fire a nuclear torpedo on a fleet of American navy vessels, after the captain aboard falsely believed they were under attack and that war between the United States and the Soviet Union was possibly already underway. Soviet military protocol stipulated that all three officers aboard had to agree before such an action was to be taken. The other officer aboard wanted to go ahead with the captain's order, while Arkhipov was alone in dissenting. His decision is widely believed to have prevented a full out nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union. He's sometimes referred to as "The Man Who Saved the World."

What's really fascinating is that in an alternate reality he agreed as well.
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