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THE BREXIT: Moving Forward

Vox_Veritas
Posts: 7,077
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6/28/2016 7:52:34 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
Like millions of Americans, I watched the situation in the UK as the British Withdrawal from the European Union Referendum of June 23 was taking place. Knowing that neither outcome would really have any noticeable impact on my life, I took 5 seconds to come up with my own opinion on the matter without putting any deep thought into it.
...And now the Brexit is happening. Regardless of whether it was a good thing or a bad thing, what's undeniable is that the British Pound has tanked in international markets since then, Scotland is threatening to leave the United Kingdom, and leaving the European Union will have some kind of negative impact on the UK's trade with Europe. Furthermore, regardless of whether it was a good or bad thing, IT'S HAPPENING, so the focus now should be on ensuring a smooth exit for Great Britain.

First of all, I'd like to say that I'm not entirely sure what being a member state of the European Union entails. I asked Admin on edeb8 (I figured a New Zealander would pay close attention to British politics), but unfortunately, if he did answer he did so in the Shoutbox, and right afterwards he had a long discussion with Stag in the Shoutbox. So I had no fricking clue.
Of what I've gathered, however, EU membership means the following:
-Trade Barriers between member states are abolished
-Travel Barriers between member states are abolished
-You use the EU's "super currency" (the Euro; this one doesn't apply to the UK, which still uses its own currency, the British Pound)
-The EU passes laws standardising the way things are made and the way business is conducted throughout its member states, which is supposed to make things more convenient for everyone
-Other miscellaneous stuff

Thus, once the UK leaves the EU, trade and travel barriers between it and the rest of Europe will emerge. This will raise the cost of doing business between the UK and Europe. Furthermore, the legal status of European citizens living in the UK without any sort of visa or permanent resident status is now uncertain in the face of travel restrictions between the UK and Europe being brought back.

Now, like I said, I don't really understand the situation. But here's my suggestion for the UK.
First, sign individual agreements with each country in Europe to keep trade AND travel restrictions roughly as low as they were while the UK was a member of the EU. However, participation in these agreements could be suspended by either party in the event of an "extreme emergency", whatever that means.
Second, whatever the UK has already standardised to meet the EU's specifications, they should keep standardised as such unless they have an explicit reason to change the way of doing things in some certain area. Keeping in line with European standards will maintain convenient dealings with Europe.
Third, do not permit Scotland to hold any binding independence referendum until 2019. Considering that they've already held a referendum as recently as 2014, I don't think it'd be unreasonable to wait a little while. By this time, all these agreements with each European countries should be fully negotiated, agreed to, and implemented. Let the Scots give the central government a chance to rectify the situation before voting to leave.

Any critiques? Random thoughts on the matter? Questions?
Call me Vox, the Resident Contrarian of debate.org.

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Blueberry_Goose
Posts: 24
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6/28/2016 10:34:32 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/28/2016 7:52:34 PM, Vox_Veritas wrote:
Like millions of Americans, I watched the situation in the UK as the British Withdrawal from the European Union Referendum of June 23 was taking place. Knowing that neither outcome would really have any noticeable impact on my life, I took 5 seconds to come up with my own opinion on the matter without putting any deep thought into it.
...And now the Brexit is happening. Regardless of whether it was a good thing or a bad thing, what's undeniable is that the British Pound has tanked in international markets since then, Scotland is threatening to leave the United Kingdom, and leaving the European Union will have some kind of negative impact on the UK's trade with Europe. Furthermore, regardless of whether it was a good or bad thing, IT'S HAPPENING, so the focus now should be on ensuring a smooth exit for Great Britain.

First of all, I'd like to say that I'm not entirely sure what being a member state of the European Union entails. I asked Admin on edeb8 (I figured a New Zealander would pay close attention to British politics), but unfortunately, if he did answer he did so in the Shoutbox, and right afterwards he had a long discussion with Stag in the Shoutbox. So I had no fricking clue.
Of what I've gathered, however, EU membership means the following:
-Trade Barriers between member states are abolished
-Travel Barriers between member states are abolished
-You use the EU's "super currency" (the Euro; this one doesn't apply to the UK, which still uses its own currency, the British Pound)
-The EU passes laws standardising the way things are made and the way business is conducted throughout its member states, which is supposed to make things more convenient for everyone
-Other miscellaneous stuff

Thus, once the UK leaves the EU, trade and travel barriers between it and the rest of Europe will emerge. This will raise the cost of doing business between the UK and Europe. Furthermore, the legal status of European citizens living in the UK without any sort of visa or permanent resident status is now uncertain in the face of travel restrictions between the UK and Europe being brought back.

Now, like I said, I don't really understand the situation. But here's my suggestion for the UK.
First, sign individual agreements with each country in Europe to keep trade AND travel restrictions roughly as low as they were while the UK was a member of the EU. However, participation in these agreements could be suspended by either party in the event of an "extreme emergency", whatever that means.
Second, whatever the UK has already standardised to meet the EU's specifications, they should keep standardised as such unless they have an explicit reason to change the way of doing things in some certain area. Keeping in line with European standards will maintain convenient dealings with Europe.
Third, do not permit Scotland to hold any binding independence referendum until 2019. Considering that they've already held a referendum as recently as 2014, I don't think it'd be unreasonable to wait a little while. By this time, all these agreements with each European countries should be fully negotiated, agreed to, and implemented. Let the Scots give the central government a chance to rectify the situation before voting to leave.

Any critiques? Random thoughts on the matter? Questions?

The BREXIT will make the UK poorer, more isolated, and irrelevant. Sadly, the US is going to have a harder time selling its positions to the rest of Europe and the world.
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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6/28/2016 10:36:47 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/28/2016 10:34:32 PM, Blueberry_Goose wrote:
At 6/28/2016 7:52:34 PM, Vox_Veritas wrote:
Like millions of Americans, I watched the situation in the UK as the British Withdrawal from the European Union Referendum of June 23 was taking place. Knowing that neither outcome would really have any noticeable impact on my life, I took 5 seconds to come up with my own opinion on the matter without putting any deep thought into it.
...And now the Brexit is happening. Regardless of whether it was a good thing or a bad thing, what's undeniable is that the British Pound has tanked in international markets since then, Scotland is threatening to leave the United Kingdom, and leaving the European Union will have some kind of negative impact on the UK's trade with Europe. Furthermore, regardless of whether it was a good or bad thing, IT'S HAPPENING, so the focus now should be on ensuring a smooth exit for Great Britain.

First of all, I'd like to say that I'm not entirely sure what being a member state of the European Union entails. I asked Admin on edeb8 (I figured a New Zealander would pay close attention to British politics), but unfortunately, if he did answer he did so in the Shoutbox, and right afterwards he had a long discussion with Stag in the Shoutbox. So I had no fricking clue.
Of what I've gathered, however, EU membership means the following:
-Trade Barriers between member states are abolished
-Travel Barriers between member states are abolished
-You use the EU's "super currency" (the Euro; this one doesn't apply to the UK, which still uses its own currency, the British Pound)
-The EU passes laws standardising the way things are made and the way business is conducted throughout its member states, which is supposed to make things more convenient for everyone
-Other miscellaneous stuff

Thus, once the UK leaves the EU, trade and travel barriers between it and the rest of Europe will emerge. This will raise the cost of doing business between the UK and Europe. Furthermore, the legal status of European citizens living in the UK without any sort of visa or permanent resident status is now uncertain in the face of travel restrictions between the UK and Europe being brought back.

Now, like I said, I don't really understand the situation. But here's my suggestion for the UK.
First, sign individual agreements with each country in Europe to keep trade AND travel restrictions roughly as low as they were while the UK was a member of the EU. However, participation in these agreements could be suspended by either party in the event of an "extreme emergency", whatever that means.
Second, whatever the UK has already standardised to meet the EU's specifications, they should keep standardised as such unless they have an explicit reason to change the way of doing things in some certain area. Keeping in line with European standards will maintain convenient dealings with Europe.
Third, do not permit Scotland to hold any binding independence referendum until 2019. Considering that they've already held a referendum as recently as 2014, I don't think it'd be unreasonable to wait a little while. By this time, all these agreements with each European countries should be fully negotiated, agreed to, and implemented. Let the Scots give the central government a chance to rectify the situation before voting to leave.

Any critiques? Random thoughts on the matter? Questions?

The BREXIT will make the UK poorer, more isolated, and irrelevant. Sadly, the US is going to have a harder time selling its positions to the rest of Europe and the world.

Your comment made my brain lose cells.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.