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Who's Next to Leave the EU?

PetersSmith
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8/12/2016 2:01:33 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
With the UK leaving the EU, Euroscepticism is on the rise throughout those countries still within it. However, there is some talk of specific countries that may be "next" to leave the EU.

1. The Netherlands: In the Netherlands, just as in Britain, there are big concerns over immigration and sovereignty " and growing demands for Dutch voters to have their own referendum on EU membership. According the PEW, about 46% of the Dutch have at least an "unfavorable" view of the EU. About 54% of the entire Netherlands wants a referendum. Geert Wilders leads Holland's "Party for Freedom", the most prominent Eurosceptic party in the Netherlands, says, "We want to be in charge of our own country, our own borders, and our own immigration policy...the Dutch need to get their opportunity to have their say about Dutch membership of the European Union" (http://www.voanews.com...). As of July, opinion polls have the PVV at 18.2%, compared to incumbent People's Party for Freedom and Democracy's 17.7%.

2. France: According to PEW, the French populace has an unfavorable view of the EU hitting 61%. Marine Le Pen, leader of the Front National, has suggested that France could follow Britain in leaving the EU, hailing the Brexit vote as the beginning of "a movement that can"t be stopped". Le Pen has said that if she wins the French presidential election next April, she will hold an in/out referendum on the country"s membership of the EU within six months. It is very clear that France has faced high terrorist threats this year, which no doubt is only fueling France's animosity towards the EU. However, contemporary French politicians, especially the incumbent, has a very favorable view of the EU (http://www.express.co.uk...).

3. Italy: According to PEW, Italy has a 39% unfavorable view of the EU. However, Italy highly disproves of the EU for economic and immigration reasons. 77% of Italians are unhappy with the EU's handling if refugees and 6% are unhappy with the EU's handling of the economy. The Five Star Movement is Italy's most prominent Eurosceptic party. Led by Beppe Grillo, Grillo capitalizes on the fact that Italian debt has reached unsustainable levels and calls for Italy leaving the Eurozone and returning to the Italian lira (http://www.theguardian.com...).

4. Denmark: Two arguments would be particularly likely to influence voter behavior. First, many Danes fear that more immigration or an influx of refugees could threaten the small nation's welfare system. Second, Denmark has so far relied on Britain as a strong ally in negotiations with the E.U. as both countries have had similar policy stances (https://www.washingtonpost.com...). The Eurosceptic party is the Danish People's Party, led by Kristian Thulesen Dahl, came first by a large margin with 26.6% of the vote in the European Parliament Election. Denmark firmly refuses to hand over more powers to the EU. Danes fear that more immigration can harm their welfare system. If the Danes leave, there's a chance they would form a bloc with other countries that leave the EU. It has a fraught relationship with Brussels, but, since Brexit, support for the EU has been on the rise (http://www.danskfolkeparti.dk...).

5. Austria: A year before Brexit, more than 260,000 Austrians signed a petition calling for their country to leave the EU. Norbert Hofer, the far-right candidate who narrowly missed out on winning the Austrian presidential election last month, has said that his country should have a referendum on EU membership if, within a year, Brussels makes any moves towards political "centralisation" and fails to refocus on its original role as an economic and trade alliance. Hofer, from the anti-immigration Freedom party (FPO), said in an interview that the EU should be about economic rather than political cooperation and any moves toward centralisation should be resisted. He has gone further in his comments than the FPO leader, Heinz-Christian Strache, who has said that an Austrian referendum on the issue might become a party objective in the future (http://www.theguardian.com...).

6. Sweden: According to PEW, 44% of Sweden's population view the EU as unfavorable and 88% view the EU's handling of immigrants as unfavorable. This animosity is led by the anti-immigrant Sweden Democrats, headed by Jimmie Akesson. "I see nothing negative about leaving this supranational European Union," said Akesson, who has repeatedly called for Sweden to "become a sovereign state again". As well as concerns for the general stability of Europe's financial markets, plenty are worried about the future business relationship between Sweden and the UK, where more than 100 Swedish companies are based. (http://www.bbc.com...).

7. Ireland: Investment guru Andrew Amoils believes the UK"s exit from the EU will result in a large number of immigrants relocating to Ireland, a move he feels will lead to Irish "panic," causing the country to hold its own referendum on EU membership."Ireland will be the only English-speaking country left in the EU. This will likely result in a large inflow of EU migrants into Ireland as most EU citizens have English as their second language. Very few EU citizens know French, German or other European languages," Amoils wrote (http://www.irishcentral.com...). The left-wing Irish republican party Sinn F"in is one party which opposes the current structure of the European Union and the direction in which it is moving. Inspired by Brexit, a new group called "Ireland Exit" is calling for a "respectful and mature" debate on whether the country should leave the 28-country bloc. Campaigners point to the fact the Republic of Ireland, a net contributor to the EU, lost "136million in 2014 as a major reason to leave (http://www.express.co.uk...).

8. Greece: According to PEW, 71% of the Greeks view the EU as unfavorable, and a whopping 92% disapprove of the EU's handling of the economy *cough*. Greece has openly debated leaving the EU many times before Brexit. The Greek government's debt crisis has mostly disappeared from the public debate and the headlines -- but it will return sooner rather than later. Communist Party of Greece (KKE), Golden Dawn, Anticapitalist Left Cooperation for the Overthrow, I Don't Pay Movement, SYRIZA, Popular Unity, ANEL and LAOS are the main Eurosceptic parties in Greece. However, despite the popularity of Euroscepticism, there is also the possibility that Greece will be kicked out of the EU in order for the EU to maintain order and stability within the remaining members of the EU (https://en.wikipedia.org...).

http://www.pewglobal.org...

So, who do you think is next to leave the EU? Who do you think is most likely to leave the EU now that the UK is out? Who do you want to leave the EU? What do you think is the future of the EU as a whole? Do you think any states will join the EU in the near future? Discuss.
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Greyparrot
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8/12/2016 2:56:02 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:51:50 AM, Hayd wrote:
I'm feeling ireland the most. Due to them being so close to Britain, and there intense nationalism.

Didn't Ireland vote against the Brexit?
Hayd
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8/12/2016 2:58:08 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:56:02 AM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:51:50 AM, Hayd wrote:
I'm feeling ireland the most. Due to them being so close to Britain, and there intense nationalism.

Didn't Ireland vote against the Brexit?

I have no idea
Greyparrot
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8/12/2016 3:00:38 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:58:08 AM, Hayd wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:56:02 AM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:51:50 AM, Hayd wrote:
I'm feeling ireland the most. Due to them being so close to Britain, and there intense nationalism.

Didn't Ireland vote against the Brexit?

I have no idea

They did. In fact, they would rather leave the UK before they left the EU.
Poor Eurocountries don't have many options when they have been on the EU teat for so long.
someloser
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8/12/2016 7:18:16 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
France pls
Ego sum qui sum. Deus lo vult.

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tejretics
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8/12/2016 12:29:56 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 3:00:38 AM, Greyparrot wrote:
They did. In fact, they would rather leave the UK before they left the EU.

Ireland isn't a part of the UK - Northern Ireland is.
"Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe." - Frederick Douglass
desmac
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8/12/2016 1:21:49 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:56:02 AM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:51:50 AM, Hayd wrote:
I'm feeling ireland the most. Due to them being so close to Britain, and there intense nationalism.

Didn't Ireland vote against the Brexit?

Northern Ireland, part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, voted against Brexit in the UK wide referendum. The Republic of Ireland has never voted on the subject of EU withdrawal.
foxxhajti
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8/12/2016 1:36:24 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:01:33 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
8. Greece: According to PEW, 71% of the Greeks view the EU as unfavorable, and a whopping 92% disapprove of the EU's handling of the economy *cough*.

Haha classic. Blaming the EU for the poor handling of their own money.
"It's interesting to observe that almost all truly worthy men have simple manners, and that simple manners are almost always taken as a sign of little worth" - Giacomo Leopardi

"It is more honorable to be raised to a throne than to be born to one. Fortune bestows the one, merit obtains the other." - Francesco Petrarca

"You too must not count too much on your reality as you feel it today, since like yesterday, it may prove an illusion for you tomorrow." - Luigi Pirandello
Skepsikyma
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8/12/2016 1:52:39 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 1:36:24 PM, foxxhajti wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:01:33 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
8. Greece: According to PEW, 71% of the Greeks view the EU as unfavorable, and a whopping 92% disapprove of the EU's handling of the economy *cough*.

Haha classic. Blaming the EU for the poor handling of their own money.

That's not really accurate. Greece is completely hamstrung because EU economic policy favors the welfare of German banks over that of the Greek economy; many well-respected economists agree that the situation has been grossly mishandled.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
foxxhajti
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8/12/2016 2:22:20 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 1:52:39 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 8/12/2016 1:36:24 PM, foxxhajti wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:01:33 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
8. Greece: According to PEW, 71% of the Greeks view the EU as unfavorable, and a whopping 92% disapprove of the EU's handling of the economy *cough*.

Haha classic. Blaming the EU for the poor handling of their own money.

That's not really accurate. Greece is completely hamstrung because EU economic policy favors the welfare of German banks over that of the Greek economy; many well-respected economists agree that the situation has been grossly mishandled.

I'm sorry but it's not completely the EU's fault.

The Greeks like avoiding taxes, which is aided and abetted by corruption where everyone pays off the tax inspector to get a tax bill that's ridiculously below what it should be.

There are financial elites in Greece of a few families who pretty much own most of the large businesses in Greece and who are extremely adept at spiriting away their profits and hiding them anywhere but in Greece. In summer, they enjoy the expensive yachts, which were paid by money that should've gone to taxes.

No one is willing to pay the taxes to keep the country's economy buoyant. A huge number of people seem to think they're owed a living at the public expense and live off government largess.

These factors have all added up to Greece's crisis. Their greedy and irresponsible bankers led poor Greece to ruins.

In 2002, Greece entered into a huge currency swap with Goldman Sachs to hide its debt. This helped Greece to dupe fellow Eurozone members and lenders, allowing it to continue borrowing recklessly. The deal was expensive, both in terms of fees and in terms of payments Greece is obligated to make as the swaps expire in 2012 through 2017. Greece's successive governments have also refused to make reforms related to labor and market that could allow faster growth. Greece has low tax receipts due to their incredibly high amount of tax evasion, which a 2009 OECD estimate placed at "20 billion of unpaid taxes per year. Consider that Greece's debt is just a bit over "300 billion. An extra "20 billion (if not frittered away by the government) would have avoided the debt crisis altogether.

Germany played no role in those. Now, what the EU actually has to do in this is:
Paul Krugman, an economist, points out that Greece has one other problem when it comes to finding a way out of this crisis. They can't use monetary policy to loosen credit in an attempt to kickstart the economy as since they're on the Euro, they're constrained by the EU central bank. Euro monetary policy has to apply to all member states which means that Greece can't devalue the Euro just in Greece.

In conclusion, this crisis is mainly Greece's fault not Germany's.
"It's interesting to observe that almost all truly worthy men have simple manners, and that simple manners are almost always taken as a sign of little worth" - Giacomo Leopardi

"It is more honorable to be raised to a throne than to be born to one. Fortune bestows the one, merit obtains the other." - Francesco Petrarca

"You too must not count too much on your reality as you feel it today, since like yesterday, it may prove an illusion for you tomorrow." - Luigi Pirandello
slo1
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8/12/2016 2:34:44 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 3:00:38 AM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:58:08 AM, Hayd wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:56:02 AM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:51:50 AM, Hayd wrote:
I'm feeling ireland the most. Due to them being so close to Britain, and there intense nationalism.

Didn't Ireland vote against the Brexit?

I have no idea

They did. In fact, they would rather leave the UK before they left the EU.
Poor Eurocountries don't have many options when they have been on the EU teat for so long.

You need to brush up on your geography son. Northern Ireland is not Ireland.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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8/12/2016 3:03:23 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:22:20 PM, foxxhajti wrote:
At 8/12/2016 1:52:39 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 8/12/2016 1:36:24 PM, foxxhajti wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:01:33 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
8. Greece: According to PEW, 71% of the Greeks view the EU as unfavorable, and a whopping 92% disapprove of the EU's handling of the economy *cough*.

Haha classic. Blaming the EU for the poor handling of their own money.

That's not really accurate. Greece is completely hamstrung because EU economic policy favors the welfare of German banks over that of the Greek economy; many well-respected economists agree that the situation has been grossly mishandled.

Germany played no role in those. Now, what the EU actually has to do in this is:
Paul Krugman, an economist, points out that Greece has one other problem when it comes to finding a way out of this crisis. They can't use monetary policy to loosen credit in an attempt to kickstart the economy as since they're on the Euro, they're constrained by the EU central bank. Euro monetary policy has to apply to all member states which means that Greece can't devalue the Euro just in Greece.

In conclusion, this crisis is mainly Greece's fault not Germany's.

The original crisis is Greece's fault, their inability to recover is on Germany's shoulders. Krugman, in other places, has rightly pointed out that Germany makes absolutely insane demands of Greece to the point where it is literally impossible, economically, for them to pay their debts. Germany isn't just being clueless, they're prioritizing the wealth of their banks over the wealth of Greece because the EU's political structure allows them to.

If Greece wants to recover, they should leave the Eurozone, because Germany is clearly just going to continue to double down on their insanity.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
foxxhajti
Posts: 479
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8/12/2016 3:13:44 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 3:03:23 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:22:20 PM, foxxhajti wrote:
At 8/12/2016 1:52:39 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 8/12/2016 1:36:24 PM, foxxhajti wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:01:33 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
8. Greece: According to PEW, 71% of the Greeks view the EU as unfavorable, and a whopping 92% disapprove of the EU's handling of the economy *cough*.

Haha classic. Blaming the EU for the poor handling of their own money.

That's not really accurate. Greece is completely hamstrung because EU economic policy favors the welfare of German banks over that of the Greek economy; many well-respected economists agree that the situation has been grossly mishandled.

Germany played no role in those. Now, what the EU actually has to do in this is:
Paul Krugman, an economist, points out that Greece has one other problem when it comes to finding a way out of this crisis. They can't use monetary policy to loosen credit in an attempt to kickstart the economy as since they're on the Euro, they're constrained by the EU central bank. Euro monetary policy has to apply to all member states which means that Greece can't devalue the Euro just in Greece.

In conclusion, this crisis is mainly Greece's fault not Germany's.

The original crisis is Greece's fault, their inability to recover is on Germany's shoulders. Krugman, in other places, has rightly pointed out that Germany makes absolutely insane demands of Greece to the point where it is literally impossible, economically, for them to pay their debts. Germany isn't just being clueless, they're prioritizing the wealth of their banks over the wealth of Greece because the EU's political structure allows them to.

If Greece wants to recover, they should leave the Eurozone, because Germany is clearly just going to continue to double down on their insanity.

On that note, I can agree.
"It's interesting to observe that almost all truly worthy men have simple manners, and that simple manners are almost always taken as a sign of little worth" - Giacomo Leopardi

"It is more honorable to be raised to a throne than to be born to one. Fortune bestows the one, merit obtains the other." - Francesco Petrarca

"You too must not count too much on your reality as you feel it today, since like yesterday, it may prove an illusion for you tomorrow." - Luigi Pirandello
brontoraptor
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8/18/2016 8:51:00 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:01:33 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
With the UK leaving the EU, Euroscepticism is on the rise throughout those countries still within it. However, there is some talk of specific countries that may be "next" to leave the EU.

1. The Netherlands: In the Netherlands, just as in Britain, there are big concerns over immigration and sovereignty " and growing demands for Dutch voters to have their own referendum on EU membership. According the PEW, about 46% of the Dutch have at least an "unfavorable" view of the EU. About 54% of the entire Netherlands wants a referendum. Geert Wilders leads Holland's "Party for Freedom", the most prominent Eurosceptic party in the Netherlands, says, "We want to be in charge of our own country, our own borders, and our own immigration policy...the Dutch need to get their opportunity to have their say about Dutch membership of the European Union" (http://www.voanews.com...). As of July, opinion polls have the PVV at 18.2%, compared to incumbent People's Party for Freedom and Democracy's 17.7%.

2. France: According to PEW, the French populace has an unfavorable view of the EU hitting 61%. Marine Le Pen, leader of the Front National, has suggested that France could follow Britain in leaving the EU, hailing the Brexit vote as the beginning of "a movement that can"t be stopped". Le Pen has said that if she wins the French presidential election next April, she will hold an in/out referendum on the country"s membership of the EU within six months. It is very clear that France has faced high terrorist threats this year, which no doubt is only fueling France's animosity towards the EU. However, contemporary French politicians, especially the incumbent, has a very favorable view of the EU (http://www.express.co.uk...).

3. Italy: According to PEW, Italy has a 39% unfavorable view of the EU. However, Italy highly disproves of the EU for economic and immigration reasons. 77% of Italians are unhappy with the EU's handling if refugees and 6% are unhappy with the EU's handling of the economy. The Five Star Movement is Italy's most prominent Eurosceptic party. Led by Beppe Grillo, Grillo capitalizes on the fact that Italian debt has reached unsustainable levels and calls for Italy leaving the Eurozone and returning to the Italian lira (http://www.theguardian.com...).

4. Denmark: Two arguments would be particularly likely to influence voter behavior. First, many Danes fear that more immigration or an influx of refugees could threaten the small nation's welfare system. Second, Denmark has so far relied on Britain as a strong ally in negotiations with the E.U. as both countries have had similar policy stances (https://www.washingtonpost.com...). The Eurosceptic party is the Danish People's Party, led by Kristian Thulesen Dahl, came first by a large margin with 26.6% of the vote in the European Parliament Election. Denmark firmly refuses to hand over more powers to the EU. Danes fear that more immigration can harm their welfare system. If the Danes leave, there's a chance they would form a bloc with other countries that leave the EU. It has a fraught relationship with Brussels, but, since Brexit, support for the EU has been on the rise (http://www.danskfolkeparti.dk...).

5. Austria: A year before Brexit, more than 260,000 Austrians signed a petition calling for their country to leave the EU. Norbert Hofer, the far-right candidate who narrowly missed out on winning the Austrian presidential election last month, has said that his country should have a referendum on EU membership if, within a year, Brussels makes any moves towards political "centralisation" and fails to refocus on its original role as an economic and trade alliance. Hofer, from the anti-immigration Freedom party (FPO), said in an interview that the EU should be about economic rather than political cooperation and any moves toward centralisation should be resisted. He has gone further in his comments than the FPO leader, Heinz-Christian Strache, who has said that an Austrian referendum on the issue might become a party objective in the future (http://www.theguardian.com...).

6. Sweden: According to PEW, 44% of Sweden's population view the EU as unfavorable and 88% view the EU's handling of immigrants as unfavorable. This animosity is led by the anti-immigrant Sweden Democrats, headed by Jimmie Akesson. "I see nothing negative about leaving this supranational European Union," said Akesson, who has repeatedly called for Sweden to "become a sovereign state again". As well as concerns for the general stability of Europe's financial markets, plenty are worried about the future business relationship between Sweden and the UK, where more than 100 Swedish companies are based. (http://www.bbc.com...).

7. Ireland: Investment guru Andrew Amoils believes the UK"s exit from the EU will result in a large number of immigrants relocating to Ireland, a move he feels will lead to Irish "panic," causing the country to hold its own referendum on EU membership."Ireland will be the only English-speaking country left in the EU. This will likely result in a large inflow of EU migrants into Ireland as most EU citizens have English as their second language. Very few EU citizens know French, German or other European languages," Amoils wrote (http://www.irishcentral.com...). The left-wing Irish republican party Sinn F"in is one party which opposes the current structure of the European Union and the direction in which it is moving. Inspired by Brexit, a new group called "Ireland Exit" is calling for a "respectful and mature" debate on whether the country should leave the 28-country bloc. Campaigners point to the fact the Republic of Ireland, a net contributor to the EU, lost "136million in 2014 as a major reason to leave (http://www.express.co.uk...).

8. Greece: According to PEW, 71% of the Greeks view the EU as unfavorable, and a whopping 92% disapprove of the EU's handling of the economy *cough*. Greece has openly debated leaving the EU many times before Brexit. The Greek government's debt crisis has mostly disappeared from the public debate and the headlines -- but it will return sooner rather than later. Communist Party of Greece (KKE), Golden Dawn, Anticapitalist Left Cooperation for the Overthrow, I Don't Pay Movement, SYRIZA, Popular Unity, ANEL and LAOS are the main Eurosceptic parties in Greece. However, despite the popularity of Euroscepticism, there is also the possibility that Greece will be kicked out of the EU in order for the EU to maintain order and stability within the remaining members of the EU (https://en.wikipedia.org...).

http://www.pewglobal.org...

So, who do you think is next to leave the EU? Who do you think is most likely to leave the EU now that the UK is out? Who do you want to leave the EU? What do you think is the future of the EU as a whole? Do you think any states will join the EU in the near future? Discuss.

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ford_prefect
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8/18/2016 8:55:33 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
How on earth does Greece view the EU unfavorably??? They've been bailed out by it so much haha
PetersSmith
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8/18/2016 8:59:31 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/18/2016 8:55:33 PM, ford_prefect wrote:
How on earth does Greece view the EU unfavorably??? They've been bailed out by it so much haha

Because they feel the need to blame someone other than themselves.
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Chloe8
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8/18/2016 9:11:22 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:56:02 AM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 8/12/2016 2:51:50 AM, Hayd wrote:
I'm feeling ireland the most. Due to them being so close to Britain, and there intense nationalism.

Didn't Ireland vote against the Brexit?

Northern Ireland voted to remain in the European Union but it's citizens are only a small proportion of the total UK population and were unable to influence the referendum result. The republic of Ireland is a seperate country. It is not a member of the UK and was not involved in the referendum.
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Chloe8
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8/18/2016 9:15:18 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/12/2016 2:01:33 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
With the UK leaving the EU, Euroscepticism is on the rise throughout those countries still within it. However, there is some talk of specific countries that may be "next" to leave the EU.

1. The Netherlands: In the Netherlands, just as in Britain, there are big concerns over immigration and sovereignty " and growing demands for Dutch voters to have their own referendum on EU membership. According the PEW, about 46% of the Dutch have at least an "unfavorable" view of the EU. About 54% of the entire Netherlands wants a referendum. Geert Wilders leads Holland's "Party for Freedom", the most prominent Eurosceptic party in the Netherlands, says, "We want to be in charge of our own country, our own borders, and our own immigration policy...the Dutch need to get their opportunity to have their say about Dutch membership of the European Union" (http://www.voanews.com...). As of July, opinion polls have the PVV at 18.2%, compared to incumbent People's Party for Freedom and Democracy's 17.7%.

2. France: According to PEW, the French populace has an unfavorable view of the EU hitting 61%. Marine Le Pen, leader of the Front National, has suggested that France could follow Britain in leaving the EU, hailing the Brexit vote as the beginning of "a movement that can"t be stopped". Le Pen has said that if she wins the French presidential election next April, she will hold an in/out referendum on the country"s membership of the EU within six months. It is very clear that France has faced high terrorist threats this year, which no doubt is only fueling France's animosity towards the EU. However, contemporary French politicians, especially the incumbent, has a very favorable view of the EU (http://www.express.co.uk...).

3. Italy: According to PEW, Italy has a 39% unfavorable view of the EU. However, Italy highly disproves of the EU for economic and immigration reasons. 77% of Italians are unhappy with the EU's handling if refugees and 6% are unhappy with the EU's handling of the economy. The Five Star Movement is Italy's most prominent Eurosceptic party. Led by Beppe Grillo, Grillo capitalizes on the fact that Italian debt has reached unsustainable levels and calls for Italy leaving the Eurozone and returning to the Italian lira (http://www.theguardian.com...).

4. Denmark: Two arguments would be particularly likely to influence voter behavior. First, many Danes fear that more immigration or an influx of refugees could threaten the small nation's welfare system. Second, Denmark has so far relied on Britain as a strong ally in negotiations with the E.U. as both countries have had similar policy stances (https://www.washingtonpost.com...). The Eurosceptic party is the Danish People's Party, led by Kristian Thulesen Dahl, came first by a large margin with 26.6% of the vote in the European Parliament Election. Denmark firmly refuses to hand over more powers to the EU. Danes fear that more immigration can harm their welfare system. If the Danes leave, there's a chance they would form a bloc with other countries that leave the EU. It has a fraught relationship with Brussels, but, since Brexit, support for the EU has been on the rise (http://www.danskfolkeparti.dk...).

5. Austria: A year before Brexit, more than 260,000 Austrians signed a petition calling for their country to leave the EU. Norbert Hofer, the far-right candidate who narrowly missed out on winning the Austrian presidential election last month, has said that his country should have a referendum on EU membership if, within a year, Brussels makes any moves towards political "centralisation" and fails to refocus on its original role as an economic and trade alliance. Hofer, from the anti-immigration Freedom party (FPO), said in an interview that the EU should be about economic rather than political cooperation and any moves toward centralisation should be resisted. He has gone further in his comments than the FPO leader, Heinz-Christian Strache, who has said that an Austrian referendum on the issue might become a party objective in the future (http://www.theguardian.com...).

6. Sweden: According to PEW, 44% of Sweden's population view the EU as unfavorable and 88% view the EU's handling of immigrants as unfavorable. This animosity is led by the anti-immigrant Sweden Democrats, headed by Jimmie Akesson. "I see nothing negative about leaving this supranational European Union," said Akesson, who has repeatedly called for Sweden to "become a sovereign state again". As well as concerns for the general stability of Europe's financial markets, plenty are worried about the future business relationship between Sweden and the UK, where more than 100 Swedish companies are based. (http://www.bbc.com...).

7. Ireland: Investment guru Andrew Amoils believes the UK"s exit from the EU will result in a large number of immigrants relocating to Ireland, a move he feels will lead to Irish "panic," causing the country to hold its own referendum on EU membership."Ireland will be the only English-speaking country left in the EU. This will likely result in a large inflow of EU migrants into Ireland as most EU citizens have English as their second language. Very few EU citizens know French, German or other European languages," Amoils wrote (http://www.irishcentral.com...). The left-wing Irish republican party Sinn F"in is one party which opposes the current structure of the European Union and the direction in which it is moving. Inspired by Brexit, a new group called "Ireland Exit" is calling for a "respectful and mature" debate on whether the country should leave the 28-country bloc. Campaigners point to the fact the Republic of Ireland, a net contributor to the EU, lost "136million in 2014 as a major reason to leave (http://www.express.co.uk...).

In my opinion the only country that may leave the EU in the near future is Greece. The dissatisfaction of Greek citizens about the EU makes the election of anti EU parties likely. It's also possible the EU may expel Greece or at least encourage its exit due to the insolvent nature of its economy and Reliance of continued EU bailouts.
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Fatihah, in his delusion that he could knock out any woman while bragging about being able to knock me out. An example of 7th century Islamic thinking inspired by his hero the paedophile Muhammad.