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Buddhist Belief Regarding The Buddha

GeoLaureate8
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8/31/2011 12:24:34 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
As with Jesus of Christianity, the nature of the Buddha is also a disputed and sometimes confusing matter. In present times, it's almost unanimously agreed that Jesus is God and part of the Trinity, but with the Buddha there is no unanimous agreement on his nature.

Given the above, share what you think the nature of the Buddha is in either the Buddhist religion, scripturally, or what you personally think he was.

Then I'll clarify as to what the nature of the Buddha is, at least from a scriptural view.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
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CosmicAlfonzo
Posts: 5,955
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8/31/2011 12:40:00 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Buddha was a VERY intelligent philosopher.

Even by today's standards, I think he would have been considered a genius.

He wasn't nearly as otherworldly and esoteric as he was made out to be, he kept it real. He had a very firm grasp of epistemology, perception and as a result had a very deep understanding of the absurd. He was a very scientifically minded individual, and was probably the first great psychologist.

I have profound respect for the Buddha. I think he would find "buddhists" of today to be comical. They frequently go through the motions without understanding the purpose, and often times completely miss the point. However, it wouldn't have been much different than how things were in his time, as most of the time the things he said flew right over the heads of the people around him.
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Lickdafoot
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8/31/2011 12:42:26 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
hmm well i don't know much about the buddhist religion besides the basics but i would like to know more (i think its the best one out of the organized religions)... what i know of buddha is basically he was a prince who became enlightened, taught his views to others w/ the middleway, eightfold path etc.. a spiritual leader and prophet but not a god.
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Man-is-good
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8/31/2011 12:48:49 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I don't know much about the Buddha, but he appears to be an impressive figure in metaphysics and in religious philosophy.

I do know that after mediating under the Bodhi tree, he came up with the four noble truths (" Suffering does exist
Suffering arises from attachment to desires
Suffering ceases when attachment to desire ceases
Freedom from suffering is possible by practicing the Eightfold Path"
http://en.wikipedia.org...)
and taught the Eightfold Path which was the medium of which one could relieve him/herself from suffering.

Then there's the fact that he is not a god at all, but I think a spiritual teacher. I would like to learn more about his teachings, since I was only given a cursory review of him in my history class....
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
Man-is-good
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8/31/2011 12:55:33 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/31/2011 12:54:00 PM, Lickdafoot wrote:
what i would like to know is had buddha ever proclaimed to or was considered to reach nirvana?

I think he reached enlightenment and understanding of the Middle Way after meditating under the Bodhi tree, but not nirvana. But then again, I could be wrong, since I'm not very acquainted with Buddhist scripture.
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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8/31/2011 12:58:29 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/31/2011 12:42:26 PM, Lickdafoot wrote:
hmm well i don't know much about the buddhist religion besides the basics but i would like to know more (i think its the best one out of the organized religions)... what i know of buddha is basically he was a prince who became enlightened, taught his views to others w/ the middleway, eightfold path etc..

It's great that you're intrested in finding out more. I may make another thread expounding the core of his philosophy (it's a bit difficult, but doable).

a spiritual leader and prophet but not a god.

Mm, I'm not sure I'd say he was a spiritual leader, he was more of a sage, however he certainly wasn't a prophet. In fact, he only focuses on the present and deems it unwholesome to worry about the future.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
GeoLaureate8
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8/31/2011 1:04:29 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/31/2011 12:54:00 PM, Lickdafoot wrote:
what i would like to know is had buddha ever proclaimed to or was considered to reach nirvana?

The Buddha had attained Nirvana and Parinirvana (the Final Liberation).

He reached an Enlightened state of Nirvana in his life time, but upon his death he reached Parinirvana which can only occur at death at happens for the Supremely Enlightened and results in complete dissolution of the aggregates (the sequential 5 components that make up ego-consciousness and the self).
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Lickdafoot
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8/31/2011 1:16:09 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/31/2011 1:04:29 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 8/31/2011 12:54:00 PM, Lickdafoot wrote:
what i would like to know is had buddha ever proclaimed to or was considered to reach nirvana?

The Buddha had attained Nirvana and Parinirvana (the Final Liberation).

He reached an Enlightened state of Nirvana in his life time, but upon his death he reached Parinirvana which can only occur at death at happens for the Supremely Enlightened and results in complete dissolution of the aggregates (the sequential 5 components that make up ego-consciousness and the self).

ahh, okay. so parinirvana is essentially the release of the ego consciousness and what is then thought to happen to the spirit... is it considered to meld with the world? or remain somewhere?

thanks for answering my questions, i'll def. read if you make a post on the buddhist philosophies.
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GeoLaureate8
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8/31/2011 1:26:12 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/31/2011 12:48:49 PM, Man-is-good wrote:
I don't know much about the Buddha, but he appears to be an impressive figure in metaphysics and in religious philosophy.

Metaphysics and "religious philosophy" weren't really what he focused on. The Buddha addressed matters in epistemology, phenomenology, psychology, ontology, the nature of reality, the nature of consciousness, and ethics.

I do know that after mediating under the Bodhi tree, he came up with the four noble truths (" Suffering does exist
Suffering arises from attachment to desires
Suffering ceases when attachment to desire ceases
Freedom from suffering is possible by practicing the Eightfold Path"
http://en.wikipedia.org...)
and taught the Eightfold Path which was the medium of which one could relieve him/herself from suffering.

That's not quite correct actually, Wiki is wrong.

Here's a direct account of what Buddha said:

"And what have I taught? 'This is stress... This is the origination of stress... This is the cessation of stress... This is the path of practice leading to the cessation of stress.' This is what I have taught. And why have I taught these things? Because they are connected with the goal, relate to the rudiments of the holy life, and lead to disenchantment, to dispassion, to cessation, to calm, to direct knowledge, to self- awakening, to Unbinding. This is why I have taught them."

-- Simsapa Sutta

http://www.accesstoinsight.org...
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Indophile
Posts: 1,414
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8/31/2011 1:29:59 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/31/2011 1:26:12 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 8/31/2011 12:48:49 PM, Man-is-good wrote:
I don't know much about the Buddha, but he appears to be an impressive figure in metaphysics and in religious philosophy.

Metaphysics and "religious philosophy" weren't really what he focused on. The Buddha addressed matters in epistemology, phenomenology, psychology, ontology, the nature of reality, the nature of consciousness, and ethics.

I do know that after mediating under the Bodhi tree, he came up with the four noble truths (" Suffering does exist
Suffering arises from attachment to desires
Suffering ceases when attachment to desire ceases
Freedom from suffering is possible by practicing the Eightfold Path"
http://en.wikipedia.org...)
and taught the Eightfold Path which was the medium of which one could relieve him/herself from suffering.

That's not quite correct actually, Wiki is wrong.

Here's a direct account of what Buddha said:

"And what have I taught? 'This is stress... This is the origination of stress... This is the cessation of stress... This is the path of practice leading to the cessation of stress.' This is what I have taught. And why have I taught these things? Because they are connected with the goal, relate to the rudiments of the holy life, and lead to disenchantment, to dispassion, to cessation, to calm, to direct knowledge, to self- awakening, to Unbinding. This is why I have taught them."

-- Simsapa Sutta

http://www.accesstoinsight.org...

Did he ever advise for excess in any part of life? Is everything to be had "in moderation"?
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GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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8/31/2011 1:39:17 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/31/2011 1:16:09 PM, Lickdafoot wrote:
At 8/31/2011 1:04:29 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
The Buddha had attained Nirvana and Parinirvana (the Final Liberation).

He reached an Enlightened state of Nirvana in his life time, but upon his death he reached Parinirvana which can only occur at death at happens for the Supremely Enlightened and results in complete dissolution of the aggregates (the sequential 5 components that make up ego-consciousness and the self).

ahh, okay. so parinirvana is essentially the release of the ego consciousness and what is then thought to happen to the spirit...

Sort of, but there is no soul/spirit in Buddhism nor is there technically a self. He refers to a self and describes the aggregates that make a self, but ultimately the self is illusory and transient / insubstantial.

is it considered to meld with the world? or remain somewhere?

It's kind of like becoming one with the Universe. Buddhist texts and teachings don't really use that language or those words to describe it, but essentially that's what it is.

According to the Buddha:

"The extinction of the Blessed One will be by that passing away in which nothing remains that could tend to the formation of another self. Nor will it be possible to point out the Blessed One as being here or there. But it will be like a flame in a great body of blazing fire. That flame has ceased; it has vanished and it cannot be said that it is here or there. In the body of the Dhanna, however, the Blessed One can be pointed out; for the Dharma has been preached by the Blessed One."
-- the Buddha
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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8/31/2011 1:56:02 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Let me clarify that the Buddha looked like this: http://www.debate.org...

He was fit and slim, not fat. I always get someone who thinks he's fat in every Buddhist thread.

It's ironic this belief has become so prevailant because the Buddha emphasized and stressed the importance keeping the body healthy and how a healthy body leads to clearer thinking.

"To keep the body in good health is a duty... otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear."
-- the Buddha
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Tiel
Posts: 1,500
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8/31/2011 5:40:31 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I think it is important to point out that Buddhist thought has evolved and diversified over the years into different Buddhist philosophies. The path to satori is not one, but many.
"Only the inner force of curiosity and wonder about the unknown, or an outer force upon your free will, can brake the shackles of your current perception."
Indophile
Posts: 1,414
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8/31/2011 8:53:58 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/31/2011 5:40:31 PM, Tiel wrote:
I think it is important to point out that Buddhist thought has evolved and diversified over the years into different Buddhist philosophies. The path to satori is not one, but many.

How many? 42?
You will say that I don't really know you
And it will be true.