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The Lonely Man of Faith

Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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2/19/2012 4:57:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Yesterday, during another SAT session, my Reading Comprehension teacher brought in a New York times editorial that discussed the seeming contradiction between the spheres of modern life and religion.

One of his more interesting points lies in the evocation of Joseph Soloveitchik (a distinguished Jewish theologian) 's work and his proposal of the dual nature of man: Adam the First", the part of man who creates, discovers, competes, and is involved in the building of the world, and "Adam the Second", the spiritual individual who is humbled by the universe.

In Soloveitchik's concept, the two were both mandated by God (at the moment of their creation) for different purposes. Specifically, the second Adam is the preserver of the garden, while the first to impose knowledge and institution upon the world:

(Note that in the essay, other concepts and ideals are used in the context of Genesis and to delineate the character of the religious man.)

My question is why should creation and respect (a general, though not entirely accurate dichotomy) be contrasted or split into two "Adams"?

Is there truly a conflict between the qualities of the two?
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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2/19/2012 4:58:50 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Or is there a conflict at all, and can the two parts be compromised or harmonized?
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
Composer
Posts: 5,858
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2/19/2012 6:37:03 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/19/2012 4:58:50 PM, Man-is-good wrote:
Or is there a conflict at all, and can the two parts be compromised or harmonized?
In Story book bible land there was provided a tree bearing the knowledge of Good & Evil, however Story book god didn't want Adam to know what either of them were and he was threatened if he even tried to find out, but wasn't informed why he was denied free access and wasn't informed what ' death ' was? (Gen. 2:17) KJV Story book
Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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2/20/2012 12:50:45 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/19/2012 6:37:03 PM, Composer wrote:
At 2/19/2012 4:58:50 PM, Man-is-good wrote:
Or is there a conflict at all, and can the two parts be compromised or harmonized?
In Story book bible land there was provided a tree bearing the knowledge of Good & Evil, however Story book god didn't want Adam to know what either of them were and he was threatened if he even tried to find out, but wasn't informed why he was denied free access and wasn't informed what ' death ' was? (Gen. 2:17) KJV Story book

A great way to not respond, story book teller.
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
Stephen_Hawkins
Posts: 5,316
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2/20/2012 4:02:20 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Try summarising the question in one statement. Are you asking whether reason and faith can be two separate thoughts?
Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach him how to be Gay, he'll positively influence the GDP.

Social Contract Theory debate: http://www.debate.org...
Man-is-good
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2/20/2012 11:44:25 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/20/2012 4:02:20 PM, Stephen_Hawkins wrote:
Try summarising the question in one statement. Are you asking whether reason and faith can be two separate thoughts?

No I am asking for a specific critique of the thesis put forth in "The Lonely Man of Faith" that we are composed of two, on the basis of the modern and of religious world(s)...
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau