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Favorite Theologian

popculturepooka
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10/31/2012 6:48:32 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
This a should be a cool topic where people name their favorite theologian, a description of their theology (and some other tidbits if you feel inclined to mention them), and some representative work of theirs that you feel presents them at their best, so to speak. Hopefully, this will give me (and others) ideas of more theologians to read up on.

Mine is George MacDonald:

"MacDonald rejected the doctrine of penal substitutionary atonement as developed by St. Anselm (1033"1109), which argues that Christ has taken the place of sinners and is punished by the wrath of God in their place, believing that in turn it raised serious questions about the character and nature of God. Instead, he taught that Christ had come to save people from their sins, and not from a Divine penalty for their sins. The problem was not the need to appease a wrathful God but the disease of cosmic evil itself. George MacDonald frequently described the Atonement in terms similar to the Christus Victor theory. MacDonald posed the rhetorical question, "Did he not foil and slay evil by letting all the waves and billows of its horrid sea break upon him, go over him, and die without rebound" spend their rage, fall defeated, and cease? Verily, he made atonement!"

MacDonald was convinced that God does not punish except to amend, and that the sole end of His greatest anger is the amelioration of the guilty. As the doctor uses fire and steel in certain deep-seated diseases, so God may use hell-fire if necessary to heal the hardened sinner. MacDonald declared, "I believe that no hell will be lacking which would help the just mercy of God to redeem his children." MacDonald posed the rhetorical question, "When we say that God is Love, do we teach men that their fear of Him is groundless?" He replied, "No. As much as they fear will come upon them, possibly far more. " The wrath will consume what they call themselves; so that the selves God made shall appear."

However, true repentance, in the sense of freely chosen moral growth, is essential to this process, and, in MacDonald's optimistic view, inevitable for all beings (see universal reconciliation). He recognised the theoretical possibility that, bathed in the eschatological divine light, some might perceive right and wrong for what they are but still refuse to be transfigured by operation of God's fires of love, but he did not think this likely.

In this theology of divine punishment, MacDonald stands in opposition to Augustine of Hippo, and in agreement with the Greek Church Fathers St. Clement of Alexandria, Origen, and St. Gregory of Nyssa, although it is unknown whether MacDonald had a working familiarity with Patristics or Eastern Orthodox Christianity. At least an indirect influence is likely, because F. D. Maurice who influenced MacDonald knew the Greek Fathers, especially Clement, very well. MacDonald states his theological views most distinctly in the sermon Justice found in the third volume of Unspoken Sermons.

In his introduction to George MacDonald: An Anthology, C. S. Lewis speaks highly of MacDonald's theology:

'This collection, as I have said, was designed not to revive MacDonald's literary reputation but to spread his religious teaching. Hence most of my extracts are taken from the three volumes of Unspoken Sermons. My own debt to this book is almost as great as one man can owe to another: and nearly all serious inquirers to whom I have introduced it acknowledge that it has given them great help sometimes indispensable help toward the very acceptance of the Christian faith.'

'I know hardly any other writer who seems to be closer, or more continually close, to the Spirit of Christ Himself. Hence his Christ-like union of tenderness and severity. Nowhere else outside the New Testament have I found terror and comfort so intertwined. '

In making this collection I was discharging a debt of justice. I have never concealed the fact that I regarded him as my master; indeed I fancy I have never written a book in which I did not quote from him. But it has not seemed to me that those who have received my books kindly take even now sufficient notice of the affiliation. Honesty drives me to emphasize it.'"

http://en.wikipedia.org...

He also influenced scores of prominent writers like " W. H. Auden, J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, E. Nesbit and Madeleine L'Engle.[1] C. S. Lewis wrote that he regarded MacDonald as his "master": "Picking up a copy of Phantastes one day at a train-station bookstall, I began to read. A few hours later," said Lewis, "I knew that I had crossed a great frontier." G. K. Chesterton cited The Princess and the Goblin as a book that had "made a difference to my whole existence."

Elizabeth Yates wrote of Sir Gibbie, "It moved me the way books did when, as a child, the great gates of literature began to open and first encounters with noble thoughts and utterances were unspeakably thrilling."[2]

Even Mark Twain, who initially disliked MacDonald, became friends with him, and there is some evidence that Twain was influenced by MacDonald.[3] Christian author Oswald Chambers (1874"1917) wrote in Christian Discipline, vol. 1, (pub. 1934) "it is a striking indication of the trend and shallowness of the modern reading public that George MacDonald's books have been so neglected."

http://en.wikipedia.org...

His best piece, IMO, is his sermon entitled "Justice":

http://www.online-literature.com...
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
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emospongebob527
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10/31/2012 6:51:48 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Mine is Pooka the Yellow Fox.
"not to toot my own horn (it aint need no tooin if u know what im saying), but my writings on "viciousness: the one true viture (fancy spelling for virtue)" and my poem "A poem I wrote about DDO" put me in a class of my damn own. im just an UNRECONGIZED geniuse" -bananafana
phantom
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10/31/2012 7:06:38 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Jesus.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
phantom
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10/31/2012 7:07:30 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Though to be serious, I kinda like C.S Lewis.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
popculturepooka
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10/31/2012 7:37:38 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/31/2012 7:07:30 PM, phantom wrote:
Though to be serious, I kinda like C.S Lewis.

What's your favorite work of his?
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
phantom
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10/31/2012 7:40:58 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/31/2012 7:37:38 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/31/2012 7:07:30 PM, phantom wrote:
Though to be serious, I kinda like C.S Lewis.

What's your favorite work of his?

Uh, Chronicles or Narnia. No not really. I don't have a favorite work but his arguments for God, specifically the one from reason, interest me and he seems like a reasonable chap (like his rejection of inerrancy).
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
phantom
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10/31/2012 7:42:03 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/31/2012 7:40:58 PM, phantom wrote:
At 10/31/2012 7:37:38 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/31/2012 7:07:30 PM, phantom wrote:
Though to be serious, I kinda like C.S Lewis.

What's your favorite work of his?

Uh, Chronicles or Narnia. No not really. I don't have a favorite work but his arguments for God, specifically the one from reason, interest me and he seems like a reasonable chap (like his rejection of inerrancy).

My overly Christian facebook friend's also like obsessed with him so I'm continually seeing his quotes lol.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,926
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10/31/2012 8:05:34 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/31/2012 7:42:03 PM, phantom wrote:
At 10/31/2012 7:40:58 PM, phantom wrote:
At 10/31/2012 7:37:38 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/31/2012 7:07:30 PM, phantom wrote:
Though to be serious, I kinda like C.S Lewis.

What's your favorite work of his?

Uh, Chronicles or Narnia. No not really. I don't have a favorite work but his arguments for God, specifically the one from reason, interest me and he seems like a reasonable chap (like his rejection of inerrancy).

My overly Christian facebook friend's also like obsessed with him so I'm continually seeing his quotes lol.

Yeah, he's, generally speaking, a Big Deal within most Protestant circles. I'm not sure about his popularity amongst other groups like Catholics and the Eastern Orthodox but I've heard some speak favorably of him. I really like him.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
philochristos
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10/31/2012 10:02:05 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Mine is Jonathan Edwards. He was a genius. He gave one of the best philosophical defenses of Calvinism I've ever read in his book, The Freedom of the Will. I also really liked his book, The End For Which God Created the World. It really puts a lot of things into perspective.
"Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education." ~Aristotle

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~Aristotle
popculturepooka
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10/31/2012 11:40:07 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/31/2012 10:02:05 PM, philochristos wrote:
Mine is Jonathan Edwards. He was a genius. He gave one of the best philosophical defenses of Calvinism I've ever read in his book, The Freedom of the Will. I also really liked his book, The End For Which God Created the World. It really puts a lot of things into perspective.

Lol, this is akward. MacDonald pretty much despised the theology of Edwards. (>.>;) I've never read an entire book from Edwards (I have read some of his stuff) , though, so I might check out The Freedom of the Will.

And I just found out there is a book comparing and contrasting their theologies.

http://www.amazon.com...

The author seemed to go from a MacDonaldian theology to an Edwardsian one. Interesting that it was pretty much the exact opposite for me.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
Ruckmanite
Posts: 289
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11/1/2012 12:19:22 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Either Charles Wesley or George Whitefield
Let your words be the genuine picture of your heart- John Wesley
Money is a horrid thing to follow, but a charming thing to meet-Henry James
AlwaysMoreThanYou
Posts: 2,900
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11/1/2012 1:54:58 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
St. Thomas Aquinas.
'When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come.' - John 16:13
Sidewalker
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11/1/2012 6:55:48 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Pierre Teilhard deChardin.

He was a Jesuit Priest, Palaeontologist, and Mystic. After a while the church forbid this troubling Priest from publishing and sent him to China to do missionary work for forty years, but after he died his sister collected his writings and got most of them published. The church is slowly coming around to his way of thinking, some day he will be sainted. He reconciled faith and science, especially Evolution and Christianity, and had ideas about where we are headed in an evolutionary sense.

Best book to start, "The Phenomenon of Man".
"It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive." " C. W. Leadbeater
blameworthy
Posts: 431
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11/1/2012 7:41:23 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 12:32:49 AM, wiploc wrote:
Bertrand Russel: He wrote so clearly, so cogently, and with such entertaining wit.
AlwaysMoreThanYou
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11/1/2012 7:49:32 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 1:54:58 AM, AlwaysMoreThanYou wrote:
St. Thomas Aquinas.

http://www.ccel.org...

Summa Theologica
'When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come.' - John 16:13
Sidewalker
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11/1/2012 8:09:31 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 12:32:49 AM, wiploc wrote:
Bertrand Russel: He wrote so clearly, so cogently, and with such entertaining wit.

Yeah, but he wasn't a theologian.
"It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive." " C. W. Leadbeater
Sidewalker
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11/1/2012 8:12:48 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 7:41:39 AM, blameworthy wrote:
Richard Dawkins

It was favorite theologian, not favorite a$$hole.

If you question the a$$hole designation, do this, go tell Dawkins he's a theologian and come back and tell us how he reacted without using the word a$$hole, bet you can't.
"It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive." " C. W. Leadbeater
medic0506
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11/1/2012 8:59:19 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 7:41:39 AM, blameworthy wrote:
Richard Dawkins

A debate I'd love to see is Dawkins against Kent Hovind (after his release).
medic0506
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11/1/2012 9:01:30 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 8:12:48 AM, Sidewalker wrote:
At 11/1/2012 7:41:39 AM, blameworthy wrote:
Richard Dawkins

It was favorite theologian, not favorite a$$hole.

If you question the a$$hole designation, do this, go tell Dawkins he's a theologian and come back and tell us how he reacted without using the word a$$hole, bet you can't.

lol...That would be fun to see his reaction. Tell him he's the pope of the atheo-evolutionist religion.
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,926
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11/1/2012 9:02:12 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 8:12:48 AM, Sidewalker wrote:
At 11/1/2012 7:41:39 AM, blameworthy wrote:
Richard Dawkins

It was favorite theologian, not favorite a$$hole.

If you question the a$$hole designation, do this, go tell Dawkins he's a theologian and come back and tell us how he reacted without using the word a$$hole, bet you can't.

And i'm fairly certain he said he is proudly ignorant of theology.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
wiploc
Posts: 1,485
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11/1/2012 10:49:22 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 8:09:31 AM, Sidewalker wrote:
At 11/1/2012 12:32:49 AM, wiploc wrote:
Bertrand Russel: He wrote so clearly, so cogently, and with such entertaining wit.

Yeah, but he wasn't a theologian.

I looked up the word "theologian" before posting.
socialpinko
Posts: 10,458
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11/1/2012 11:57:19 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Soren Kierkegaard. If I was a Christian, I'd be Kierkegaardian all the way. I suppose that's in line with be hating Aquinas.
: At 9/29/2014 10:55:59 AM, imabench wrote:
: : At 9/29/2014 9:43:46 AM, kbub wrote:
: :
: : DDO should discredit support of sexual violence at any time and in every way.
:
: I disagree.
Deathbeforedishonour
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11/1/2012 12:05:59 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
St. Augustine of Hippo
"In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God." ~ John 1:1

Matthew 10:22- "And ye shall be hated of all men for my name's sake: but he that endureth to the end shall be saved."
philochristos
Posts: 2,614
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11/1/2012 2:40:51 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 11:57:19 AM, socialpinko wrote:
Soren Kierkegaard. If I was a Christian, I'd be Kierkegaardian all the way. I suppose that's in line with be hating Aquinas.

I have a serious problem with Kierkegaard's fideism.
"Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education." ~Aristotle

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~Aristotle
philochristos
Posts: 2,614
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11/1/2012 2:43:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/31/2012 11:40:07 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
I've never read an entire book from Edwards (I have read some of his stuff) , though, so I might check out The Freedom of the Will.

The Freedom of the Will changed my way of thinking, but it's not an easy book. I really didn't understand a lot of it until I tried to teach it to other people.
"Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education." ~Aristotle

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~Aristotle
socialpinko
Posts: 10,458
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11/1/2012 2:50:08 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/1/2012 2:40:51 PM, philochristos wrote:
At 11/1/2012 11:57:19 AM, socialpinko wrote:
Soren Kierkegaard. If I was a Christian, I'd be Kierkegaardian all the way. I suppose that's in line with be hating Aquinas.

I have a serious problem with Kierkegaard's fideism.

Den I guezz we goin' dook it out amirite?

Seriously though what's wrong with it?
: At 9/29/2014 10:55:59 AM, imabench wrote:
: : At 9/29/2014 9:43:46 AM, kbub wrote:
: :
: : DDO should discredit support of sexual violence at any time and in every way.
:
: I disagree.