Total Posts:6|Showing Posts:1-6
Jump to topic:

Intelligence vs. Wisdom

Radar
Posts: 424
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/21/2013 1:57:25 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Things have degenerated to a contest between competing ideas, a sand fight.

Here is an interesting article about what it's really about: intelligence vs. wisdom.

http://multisenserealism.com...
PureX
Posts: 1,528
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/22/2013 10:57:10 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
That's an interesting essay, and I agree with much of it.

But as I was reading it, the thought occurred to me that what was being expounded upon was only the two poles of the "X" axis. And that it was overlooking what I would consider to be the "Y" axis of the 'ideological paradigm chart'. If the "X" axis is defined by wisdom vs intelligence (variations in content), I think the "Y" axis would be defined relativism vs absolutism (variations in intensity).

Until fairly recently in human history, the world we live in has been perceived as being basically constant. People came and went, but the world remained pretty much as it had always been. And the philosophies and the religions and the cultures that we humans developed over many centuries all reflected this perceived constancy via the idea of the absolute. Our gods were viewed as expressions of the eternal and the absolute. Our empires were based on the idea of themselves as being eternal and absolute. And our philosophies expounded upon the idea that existence was governed by eternal and absolute cosmic forces and laws. And through our perception and belief in this kind of cosmic permanence, we came to believe that somehow, we, too, must ultimately be eternal; that our individual death and dissolution were only an illusion, and that we must live on in some other place or form.

And then we stumbled upon the scientific process, by which we could begin to really explore the nature of the world around us. And the more we began to do so, the more disconcerting the findings became. It began to appear as if the world around us was not the eternal absolute that we had always believed. And scarier still, if that were so, the idea of our own immortality might have to be questioned, as well. And that was something that many of us were simply not willing to do. And still aren't willing to do.

Science brought us the revelation of relativity. Not just the scientific theory of relativity, but the philosophical revelation of relativism. And that revelation shook the foundations of human thought and history to it's very core. And is still do so.

Some os us, when confronted with this revelation, have accepted it as being a part of our reality, and are now seeking to assimilate it into our conceptual paradigm of ourselves and of 'reality'. While others of us are refusing to accept this revelation, and so are actively fighting against the assimilation of it and any of it's cultural, religious, and philosophical repercussions. And the more intently these folks seek to deny this revelation of relativism, the more 'absolutists' (extremist) they become in the maintenance of their own current religious, cultural, and philosophical paradigms.

I believe that humanity is currently involved in a kind fundamental conceptual schism brought on by our discovery and use of the scientific process. As it has led us to come face to face with the relative nature existence, and through that to the finite nature of our own selves and of humanity. And that the rise we are seeing in extremism, first by religious fundamentalists, then by political/cultural fundamentalists, and now even by these new 'scientific-atheist' fundamentalists, are all reflections of this schism, and of the increasing intensity of the conceptual "war" going on between and among them.

The intelligence/wisdom variation referred to in that essay illuminates the differences in our intellectual personalities. But I think it's this absolutist/relativist variation that illuminates the intensity with which we 'fight' to protect and maintain our current intellectual conceptual paradigms.
Radar
Posts: 424
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/22/2013 1:32:13 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I think I get what you are saying: The thought that truth can never be more than relative in a space-time universe scares the hell out of a lot us so we either circle the wagons or lash out -- and even science, often portrayed as more open to change than religion, is not immune.

I think the analogy of ideas being tossed around like handfuls of sand is an appropriate one.

I'm going to read The Psychic Grid by Beatrice Bruteau again.
PureX
Posts: 1,528
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/23/2013 7:52:58 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 4/22/2013 1:32:13 PM, Radar wrote:
I think I get what you are saying: The thought that truth can never be more than relative in a space-time universe scares the hell out of a lot us so we either circle the wagons or lash out -- and even science, often portrayed as more open to change than religion, is not immune.

It's very difficult for we humans to just 'stand there in our unknowing'. Even though, ultimately, that's the human condition. We are OF the whole, but NOT the whole (the point of the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden, I think). But we have these nice brains with big imaginations, and we just gotta use 'em. And so we do. But in doing so, we forget that's what we're doing: imagining reality, and presuming to know the whole of it.
drafterman
Posts: 18,870
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/23/2013 8:22:46 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Intelligence determines how well your character learns and reasons. This ability is important for wizards because it affects how many spells they can cast, how hard their spells are to resist, and how powerful their spells can be. It"s also important for any character who wants to have a wide assortment of skills.

Wisdom describes a character"s willpower, common sense, perception, and intuition. While Intelligence represents one"s ability to analyze information, Wisdom represents being in tune with and aware of one"s surroundings. Wisdom is the most important ability for clerics and druids, and it is also important for paladins and rangers. If you want your character to have acute senses, put a high score in Wisdom. Every creature has a Wisdom score.
Radar
Posts: 424
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/23/2013 5:14:17 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 4/23/2013 7:52:58 AM, PureX wrote:
At 4/22/2013 1:32:13 PM, Radar wrote:
I think I get what you are saying: The thought that truth can never be more than relative in a space-time universe scares the hell out of a lot us so we either circle the wagons or lash out -- and even science, often portrayed as more open to change than religion, is not immune.

It's very difficult for we humans to just 'stand there in our unknowing'. Even though, ultimately, that's the human condition. We are OF the whole, but NOT the whole (the point of the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden, I think). But we have these nice brains with big imaginations, and we just gotta use 'em. And so we do. But in doing so, we forget that's what we're doing: imagining reality, and presuming to know the whole of it.

Yes. It is human nature to define the world around us, but it all too easy to get stuck in our definitions. As I said elsewhere, many people carefully construct castles made of sand while ignoring completely that reality itself is not something comprised of grains of sand, but rather a continuum in which all separation is an illusion. We have nothing but 'averages' in nature, and that because everything is constructed from relations. That is, any point in space or time is an average of relations. What really exists is a process, and thus, we can never know its details because it has no details. The details that we can measure or observe, the details that we can define, are always an average of this process.