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The name YHWH!

Sower4GS
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6/5/2013 1:11:32 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
http://www.eliyah.com...
Why the Heavenly Father's
name is pronounced, "Yahweh"
(updated 9/4/2011)

To see why His name is pronounced "Yahweh" I would point you to the following resource which I have checked out thoroughly and have found to be adequate and in agreement with what I have found on the pronunciation.

Click here to download the in depth study that demonstrates "Yahweh" to be the correct pronunciation. Note that the u and w are often interchangeable (e.g. persuade and perswade sound the same). Thus if one spelled it Yahweh or Yahueh we could get the same pronunciation, but most people who see the word "Yahueh" would tend to pronounce the H as a hard consonant. Thus, Yahweh seems to be the best spelling to convey the sounds in Hebrew.

This download is a chapter from the book entitled "The Sacred name" by R.Clover. I don't necessarily endorse the views of the author in other chapters of this book or other topics.

IMPORTANT NOTE AND UPDATE - 9/4/2011:

Lately, I have noticed that there are many using the form "Yahuah" or "Yahuwah" based on the fact that the name יהודה "Yahudah/Yehudah" (Judah) contains the same letters as יהוה with the exception of the ד Daleth (D) being added (Hebrew reads from right to left). In other words, Yahweh's name contains יהוה (Yod Heh Waw Heh) and the name of one of the sons of Israel (Judah) is יהודה (Yod Heh Waw Daleth Heh.)

They say that the Heavenly Father's name can be "made simple" by believing that since there is only one letter difference between the two names, we can learn the right pronunciation of the Heavenly Father's name by looking at how Judah's name is pronounced in Hebrew.

But the truth is, we cannot determine the pronunciation of one Hebrew word by looking at how another word is pronounced with similar letters. This is because Hebrew words usually contain missing vowels. The reader has to supply the vowels based on their existing knowledge of the language. Thus, you can have numerous words where there is one consonant difference and yet they are pronounced completely different.

Here are a couple of examples in Hebrew where there is only one letter different than Yahweh's name, yet the pronunciation is different:

The verb "Hama" (#1993) is found in Jer. 6:23, 48:36, 50:42 in the qal imperfect 3rd person masculine singular form, and is spelled יהמה but pronounced "Yehemeh." This is only one letter different than יהוה, yet the pronunciation is different.

The Hebrew word "Hegeh" (#1897) is found in Job 27:4, Psalm 37:30 and 7 other verses in the qal imperfect 3rd person masculine singular form and is spelled יהגה, yet it is pronounced "Yehgeh." This is only one letter different than יהוה, yet the pronunciation is different.

If we removed vowels from two English words that had similar consonants, no one would argue that we can learn the vowels of one word by knowing the vowels of another. For instance "word," "ward" and "weird' would all have the same consonants (WRD) but different vowel sounds and different meanings.

In fact, there are examples in Hebrew of where two words with different meanings are spelled exactly the same way, yet they are pronounced differently. The word שאול, which is pronounced "Shaul" (King Saul's name) is spelled exactly the same as the word שאול, pronounced "Sheol." "Shaul" means "desired" but "Sheol" means "grave." The vowels and meaning are different, but the word is spelled the same. If שאול (Shaul) is spelled the same as שאול (Sheol), yet has different vowels, why would we believe that יהוה must automatically have the same vowels as יהודה ?

If the "Yahu" in "Yahu-dah" means "praise Yahweh," this would be a compound word with the "Yahu-" referring to Yahueh/Yahweh and the "-dah" coming from another word altogether. Thus, we really can't rely on the "Dah" pronunciation to arrive at the correct pronunciation of the final syllable in יהוה. It is derived from a different source.

See link: http://www.eliyah.com... For the topping! The code will appear as true Hebraic font on the site!
Fruitytree
Posts: 2,176
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6/5/2013 2:10:42 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Interesting,

But one name is not enough, you need to bring a lot of names that contain the Word "YHWH" in them, because names pronunciation also changes, so you need to verify it by checking as much ancient names as possible.
Sower4GS
Posts: 1,718
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6/6/2013 10:19:52 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Found one for you........Yahshua, no others, though, so far.....For 43 years so far that's the only name...looking...not too hard though cause I know there are not any others.....
Fruitytree
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6/6/2013 1:50:38 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
There are, I found some more, please have a look:

Yehoash

Yehonadav

Yehonatan, Jonathan

Yehoram, Yoram, Jehoram

Yehoshua, Joshua

Yehuda, Judah

Yehu !!

Yehoyada

So names that start by YHWH have Yehu- or Yeho, and names that end by YHWH have Yaho or Yahu.

As YHWH is alone and not attached to anything, it is better to assume YHWH = Yehuwah. like the names that start with YHWH.

A small remark: Ye = the , so it is possible that Yehuwah is in fact composed of Ye and Huah.

I will PM you a secret about "Huah" and how important it is in Islam.

For more names:

http://en.wikipedia.org...
Sower4GS
Posts: 1,718
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6/6/2013 2:06:57 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Oh, I was talking about YHWH's Holiness and Oneness and that He is the only Elohim.
Kadosh (Holy) / Echad (One) / Elohim (plural usage of the word god) for those who know little Hebrew Tree. I know you are familiar with these words.
Fruitytree
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6/6/2013 4:57:06 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 2:06:57 PM, Sower4GS wrote:
Oh, I was talking about YHWH's Holiness and Oneness and that He is the only Elohim.
Kadosh (Holy) / Echad (One) / Elohim (plural usage of the word god) for those who know little Hebrew Tree. I know you are familiar with these words.

I thought I was in the context by pointing out the correct pronunciation .
Sower4GS
Posts: 1,718
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6/9/2013 5:50:06 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/5/2013 1:11:32 PM, Sower4GS wrote:
http://www.eliyah.com...
Why the Heavenly Father's
name is pronounced, "Yahweh"
(updated 9/4/2011)

To see why His name is pronounced "Yahweh" I would point you to the following resource which I have checked out thoroughly and have found to be adequate and in agreement with what I have found on the pronunciation.

Click here to download the in depth study that demonstrates "Yahweh" to be the correct pronunciation. Note that the u and w are often interchangeable (e.g. persuade and perswade sound the same). Thus if one spelled it Yahweh or Yahueh we could get the same pronunciation, but most people who see the word "Yahueh" would tend to pronounce the H as a hard consonant. Thus, Yahweh seems to be the best spelling to convey the sounds in Hebrew.

This download is a chapter from the book entitled "The Sacred name" by R.Clover. I don't necessarily endorse the views of the author in other chapters of this book or other topics.



IMPORTANT NOTE AND UPDATE - 9/4/2011:

Lately, I have noticed that there are many using the form "Yahuah" or "Yahuwah" based on the fact that the name יהודה "Yahudah/Yehudah" (Judah) contains the same letters as יהוה with the exception of the ד Daleth (D) being added (Hebrew reads from right to left). In other words, Yahweh's name contains יהוה (Yod Heh Waw Heh) and the name of one of the sons of Israel (Judah) is יהודה (Yod Heh Waw Daleth Heh.)

They say that the Heavenly Father's name can be "made simple" by believing that since there is only one letter difference between the two names, we can learn the right pronunciation of the Heavenly Father's name by looking at how Judah's name is pronounced in Hebrew.

But the truth is, we cannot determine the pronunciation of one Hebrew word by looking at how another word is pronounced with similar letters. This is because Hebrew words usually contain missing vowels. The reader has to supply the vowels based on their existing knowledge of the language. Thus, you can have numerous words where there is one consonant difference and yet they are pronounced completely different.

Here are a couple of examples in Hebrew where there is only one letter different than Yahweh's name, yet the pronunciation is different:

The verb "Hama" (#1993) is found in Jer. 6:23, 48:36, 50:42 in the qal imperfect 3rd person masculine singular form, and is spelled יהמה but pronounced "Yehemeh." This is only one letter different than יהוה, yet the pronunciation is different.


The Hebrew word "Hegeh" (#1897) is found in Job 27:4, Psalm 37:30 and 7 other verses in the qal imperfect 3rd person masculine singular form and is spelled יהגה, yet it is pronounced "Yehgeh." This is only one letter different than יהוה, yet the pronunciation is different.

If we removed vowels from two English words that had similar consonants, no one would argue that we can learn the vowels of one word by knowing the vowels of another. For instance "word," "ward" and "weird' would all have the same consonants (WRD) but different vowel sounds and different meanings.

In fact, there are examples in Hebrew of where two words with different meanings are spelled exactly the same way, yet they are pronounced differently. The word שאול, which is pronounced "Shaul" (King Saul's name) is spelled exactly the same as the word שאול, pronounced "Sheol." "Shaul" means "desired" but "Sheol" means "grave." The vowels and meaning are different, but the word is spelled the same. If שאול (Shaul) is spelled the same as שאול (Sheol), yet has different vowels, why would we believe that יהוה must automatically have the same vowels as יהודה ?

If the "Yahu" in "Yahu-dah" means "praise Yahweh," this would be a compound word with the "Yahu-" referring to Yahueh/Yahweh and the "-dah" coming from another word altogether. Thus, we really can't rely on the "Dah" pronunciation to arrive at the correct pronunciation of the final syllable in יהוה. It is derived from a different source.

See link: http://www.eliyah.com... For the topping! The code will appear as true Hebraic font on the site!
Good teaching. HUH?
Sower4GS
Posts: 1,718
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6/21/2013 10:09:54 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
ct_15:21 "For from ancient generations Mosheh has, in every city, those proclaiming him " being read in the congregations every Sabbath."