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Can something that's perfect change?

stubs
Posts: 1,887
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10/11/2013 6:56:04 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
One thing that I think a lot of people assume that if something changes, it cannot have been perfect, or it is no longer perfect. Do you think this assumption is accurate?
Fruitytree
Posts: 2,176
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10/11/2013 7:02:29 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
First you need you'd need to define what perfect means, cause it seems not everybody has the same "perfect" in mind.

To me I can call something perfect if it serves its purpose the best way possible, so "perfect" really depend on purpose.

That's for creation, unless you are talking about God?
Rational_Thinker9119
Posts: 9,054
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10/11/2013 9:33:50 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/11/2013 6:56:04 PM, stubs wrote:
One thing that I think a lot of people assume that if something changes, it cannot have been perfect, or it is no longer perfect. Do you think this assumption is accurate?

I used to think this was the case, but Dr. Craig made an analogy that made me question that position. Think of "as perfect as can be" as at the top of a chart, and think of "as flawed as can be" as at the bottom of the chart. A being at the top, must remain at the top if to be necessarily perfect at all times. However, the being can still move to the side without losing any perfection! Basically, there can be different states with the same amount of perfection, even though they are different. So, if God changes states, he could just be changing states that share the top of the chart, but vary across side to side.
Rational_Thinker9119
Posts: 9,054
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10/11/2013 9:39:34 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
On the other hand, if one willingly changes, this entails they weren't satisfied with their prior state (if they were, why change?) How could one not be satisfied by perfection? Wouldn't perfection entail being perfectly satisfied with it? Who knows, I guess it is a matter up to debate.