Total Posts:9|Showing Posts:1-9
Jump to topic:

Why Are Adult Humans Afraid To Think?

Kassandra
Posts: 47
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
11/28/2013 2:59:01 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I have a very intelligent dog. When he was about 2, he used to see tumbleweeds blowing across the plains. He would get angry that these beings were on his turf and would chase them, hair standing on end, growling, barking like he was chasing live prey. He would catch the tumbleweed and shake it (to kill it), then proudly drop it at my feet, whereupon it would be caught in the wind and "run" from him once again. He then got in the habit of shredding the tumbleweed--just to be sure. Once a hand towel fell off a shower rod behind me, whereupon my dog ran past me, grabbed the towel, shook it thoroughly and dumped it in the toilet--which is where he had seen me drop swatted flies--just to be sure. Why am I telling this story about my dog? It occurred to me that dogs are highly superstitious animals. They neither see wind, nor understand gravity. If something that looks and smells "dead" falls or starts running across the desert, then it must somehow have a life in it. I wonder if early hominids invented gods to explain occurances that they could not understand or explain, as well. These stories of creation, were told and retold and were embellished along the way. Each group having their own set of stories. Eventually, stories about gods were written down, which meant, to the unenlightened mind, that the stories were true--otherwise, they would not be written down. Then, too, there have always been prophets, priests, virgin births, demigods, tales of miracles--like bushes that move by themselves (or was that burned but not consumed?). Each layer of confabulation adding a veneer of authenticity to what began as a superstition, or a story, or a flat out lie. My dog is 4 now, and no longer chases tumbleweeds nor attacks hand towels. He was somehow able to reason out that there is no life in a dead plant that rolls across the desert, or in any other object that moves unexpectedly. There are things that are alive and things that are not. Period. He focuses on the living things that are real and ignores things that pose no threat. In short, he has learned to think. Just as a dog or human baby learns that a mirror image is not another dog or child. Why, then, are humans of the adult variety unwilling or unable to sift out the truth from the illusions and superstitions?
Kassandra
Ramshutu
Posts: 4,063
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
11/28/2013 6:02:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 11/28/2013 4:25:14 PM, Installgentoo wrote:
Christianity is responsible for honing the scientific method and the Big Bang theory and you think we're afraid to think?

Actually, it was manly Muslim nations that really pushed forward the scientific method as a continuation of ancient greeces logical thought.

Three guesses why Babylon is no longer at the forefront of world science and learning?

Ironically, Islam exported the fundamentals of science to the western world, (in fact our "western values" came from in no small part "eastern values") and the same dogmatic censorship of science on fundamentally religious grounds that arguably ended that scientific dominance in the 1500s is now being taken up too. I guess it must be a package deal.
Installgentoo
Posts: 1,420
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
11/28/2013 6:29:36 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 11/28/2013 6:02:02 PM, Ramshutu wrote:
At 11/28/2013 4:25:14 PM, Installgentoo wrote:
Christianity is responsible for honing the scientific method and the Big Bang theory and you think we're afraid to think?

Actually, it was manly Muslim nations that really pushed forward the scientific method as a continuation of ancient greeces logical thought.

Wrong, it was a Christian Monk, funded by the Church.

The rest of your post is just absurd and factualy wrong, the Muslim world isn't trying to attack us. Islamism is trying to attack us, which is a political ideology.
Ramshutu
Posts: 4,063
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
11/28/2013 6:35:53 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 11/28/2013 6:29:36 PM, Installgentoo wrote:
At 11/28/2013 6:02:02 PM, Ramshutu wrote:
At 11/28/2013 4:25:14 PM, Installgentoo wrote:
Christianity is responsible for honing the scientific method and the Big Bang theory and you think we're afraid to think?

Actually, it was manly Muslim nations that really pushed forward the scientific method as a continuation of ancient greeces logical thought.

Wrong, it was a Christian Monk, funded by the Church.

The rest of your post is just absurd and factualy wrong, the Muslim world isn't trying to attack us. Islamism is trying to attack us, which is a political ideology.

Um when did I say the Muslim world is attacking us.

And I would actually suggest you google the history of science, as no small part of our modern science is from the direct influence of the Muslim ascendency in science.
Installgentoo
Posts: 1,420
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
11/28/2013 6:47:03 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 11/28/2013 6:35:53 PM, Ramshutu wrote:
At 11/28/2013 6:29:36 PM, Installgentoo wrote:
At 11/28/2013 6:02:02 PM, Ramshutu wrote:
At 11/28/2013 4:25:14 PM, Installgentoo wrote:
Christianity is responsible for honing the scientific method and the Big Bang theory and you think we're afraid to think?

Actually, it was manly Muslim nations that really pushed forward the scientific method as a continuation of ancient greeces logical thought.

Wrong, it was a Christian Monk, funded by the Church.

The rest of your post is just absurd and factualy wrong, the Muslim world isn't trying to attack us. Islamism is trying to attack us, which is a political ideology.

Um when did I say the Muslim world is attacking us.

Misread that, sorry.

And I would actually suggest you google the history of science, as no small part of our modern science is from the direct influence of the Muslim ascendency in science.

And you've misread me. I stated that two major discoveries were discovered by Christians. Not all of science. Just major parts of it.
Composer
Posts: 5,858
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
11/28/2013 7:13:27 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
J.ws are typical of those placed under Cult suppression orders and are NOT permitted to freely express their individual thoughts and J.ws are too afraid to do so, for fear of the wrath of the Bethel Flip-Flopping Botchtower the False Prophets & Paedophile Protectors, which denies individual thinking of members; under pain of their dis-fellowship & ' shunning '.

This is easily proven by the Douglas-Walsh Transcript, Scotland, 1954.
Idealist
Posts: 2,520
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
11/28/2013 7:34:25 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 11/28/2013 2:59:01 PM, Kassandra wrote:
I have a very intelligent dog. When he was about 2, he used to see tumbleweeds blowing across the plains. He would get angry that these beings were on his turf and would chase them, hair standing on end, growling, barking like he was chasing live prey. He would catch the tumbleweed and shake it (to kill it), then proudly drop it at my feet, whereupon it would be caught in the wind and "run" from him once again. He then got in the habit of shredding the tumbleweed--just to be sure. Once a hand towel fell off a shower rod behind me, whereupon my dog ran past me, grabbed the towel, shook it thoroughly and dumped it in the toilet--which is where he had seen me drop swatted flies--just to be sure. Why am I telling this story about my dog? It occurred to me that dogs are highly superstitious animals. They neither see wind, nor understand gravity. If something that looks and smells "dead" falls or starts running across the desert, then it must somehow have a life in it. I wonder if early hominids invented gods to explain occurances that they could not understand or explain, as well. These stories of creation, were told and retold and were embellished along the way. Each group having their own set of stories. Eventually, stories about gods were written down, which meant, to the unenlightened mind, that the stories were true--otherwise, they would not be written down. Then, too, there have always been prophets, priests, virgin births, demigods, tales of miracles--like bushes that move by themselves (or was that burned but not consumed?). Each layer of confabulation adding a veneer of authenticity to what began as a superstition, or a story, or a flat out lie. My dog is 4 now, and no longer chases tumbleweeds nor attacks hand towels. He was somehow able to reason out that there is no life in a dead plant that rolls across the desert, or in any other object that moves unexpectedly. There are things that are alive and things that are not. Period. He focuses on the living things that are real and ignores things that pose no threat. In short, he has learned to think. Just as a dog or human baby learns that a mirror image is not another dog or child. Why, then, are humans of the adult variety unwilling or unable to sift out the truth from the illusions and superstitions?

Well, for one what you are describing is more indicative of instinctive reactions than real intelligence. I had a cat once who learned to pee in the commode all on his own, but could never grasp taking a dump there. Presently I have two small dogs, one still a puppy and one that's older. The puppy's behavior sounds much like your dog's, while the older one's hormones have settled and it has become must less "jumpy." Many dogs never learn to recognize a mirror reflection as their own, and will continuously attack such reflections as if they were strange intruder dogs, whereas even infant humans figure this out quite easily.

Concerning the other part of your argument, there is no doubt that in many ways it is spot-on. We still do that today, and call the stories 'urban myths'. The Bible is a book that was written in very superstitious times, and I have no doubt that it does contain a certain amount of these 'ancient urban myths'. But they certainly do not comprise the whole Bible, or likely even a high percentage. For one thing, most of the subject matter in the Bible is fairly straight-forward and would leave little room for 'mythification'. It contains histories and genealogies, common wisdoms of the time, and many other completely rational things. I suppose it's up to each person to find their own meaning in the Bible, their own version of what's true and what doesn't sound acceptable. I've always believed that the Bible was a book meant to teach moral lessons more than anything else, but I have no doubt that it contains descriptions of incidences in which certain people have experienced transcendence of some kind. As Einstein said in an interview in The Saturday Evening Post in 1929, "Jesus is too colossal for the pen of phrasemongers, . . No one can read the Gospels without feeling the actual presence of Jesus. His personality pulsates in every word. No myth is filled with such life." As for the miracles he supposedly created, that's another thing the reader must decide to believe or not.
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,926
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
11/28/2013 7:40:03 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 11/28/2013 2:59:01 PM, Kassandra wrote:
I have a very intelligent dog. When he was about 2, he used to see tumbleweeds blowing across the plains. He would get angry that these beings were on his turf and would chase them, hair standing on end, growling, barking like he was chasing live prey. He would catch the tumbleweed and shake it (to kill it), then proudly drop it at my feet, whereupon it would be caught in the wind and "run" from him once again. He then got in the habit of shredding the tumbleweed--just to be sure. Once a hand towel fell off a shower rod behind me, whereupon my dog ran past me, grabbed the towel, shook it thoroughly and dumped it in the toilet--which is where he had seen me drop swatted flies--just to be sure. Why am I telling this story about my dog? It occurred to me that dogs are highly superstitious animals. They neither see wind, nor understand gravity. If something that looks and smells "dead" falls or starts running across the desert, then it must somehow have a life in it. I wonder if early hominids invented gods to explain occurances that they could not understand or explain, as well. These stories of creation, were told and retold and were embellished along the way. Each group having their own set of stories. Eventually, stories about gods were written down, which meant, to the unenlightened mind, that the stories were true--otherwise, they would not be written down. Then, too, there have always been prophets, priests, virgin births, demigods, tales of miracles--like bushes that move by themselves (or was that burned but not consumed?). Each layer of confabulation adding a veneer of authenticity to what began as a superstition, or a story, or a flat out lie. My dog is 4 now, and no longer chases tumbleweeds nor attacks hand towels. He was somehow able to reason out that there is no life in a dead plant that rolls across the desert, or in any other object that moves unexpectedly. There are things that are alive and things that are not. Period. He focuses on the living things that are real and ignores things that pose no threat. In short, he has learned to think. Just as a dog or human baby learns that a mirror image is not another dog or child. Why, then, are humans of the adult variety unwilling or unable to sift out the truth from the illusions and superstitions?

Protip: telling a just-so story* in response to a perceived just-so story doesn't actually do anything important.

*http://en.wikipedia.org...
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!