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Part II: Transhumanism, prophecy revealed?

SemperVI
Posts: 294
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12/24/2013 11:55:21 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
This is the second of a two part forum discussion. The second discussion deals with RFID, transhumanism and bio-computing technology.
Transhumanism is the belief or theory that the human race can evolve beyond its current physical and mental limitations, especially by means of science and technology.

Transhumanists support the emergence and convergence of technologies including nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science (NBIC), and hypothetical future technologies including simulated reality, artificial intelligence, superintelligence, mind uploading, chemical brain preservation, and cryonics. They believe that humans can and should use these technologies to become more than human.

Dangerous Things is a website that will sell you electronic chips you can have implanted into your skin. From these chips, you can program a device to do just about anything with the swipe of your hand. The move to outfit people with electronic devices that can be swallowed, implanted in their bodies or attached to their skin via "smart tattoos" could revolutionize the world and change the way people interact with devices and one another. Imagine mentally querying a database on demand or being able to reference any and all information mentally. Critics call the trend intrusive, even sacrilegious. But others say it ultimately will make life better for everybody. Some researchers and executives envision a day when devices placed in people will enable them to control computers, prosthetic devices and many other things solely with their thoughts.

"In the next 10 to 20 years we will see rapid development in bioengineered and man-machine interfaces," predicted Graafstra, who wrote a book about the technology, adding that the trend is going to "push the boundaries of what it means to be human." Many large technology companies and researchers are keenly interested in the topic.

Similar notions are under study by others, including UC Berkeley researchers. In a scholarly paper published in July, they proposed implanting people"s brains with thousands of tiny sensors they called "neural dust."

The idea initially is to have the little circuits gather detailed data on brain functions. But eventually, lead researcher Dongjin Seo said, the electronic swarms may prove useful for "controlling devices via thought" or stimulating malfunctioning brain regions to restore "limb motor control for paralyzed patients."

Last year, Proteus Digital Health of Redwood City won approval to sell a pill that relays information about a person"s vital signs via a mobile phone to their doctor. And officials at Santa Clara-based Intel envision their microchips one day in devices ingested or implanted for medical and other uses.

Some fear implants might become mandatory for health insurance or jobs. This fear is not irrational.

After learning about a Cincinnati video surveillance firm that required employees to have a chip inserted in them, California Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, introduced a bill that became law in 2008 forbidding anyone in this state from making similar demands.

Two years later, when the Virginia House of Delegates passed a similar measure, some of the lawmakers " citing biblical references about the Antichrist " denounced implanted chips as "the mark of the beast."

Nonetheless, Intel futurist Brian David Johnson thinks the public initially will be more amenable to smart tattoos than computerized pills or gadgets inserted into them, because "something on your skin, that"s a baby step" compared to a swallowed or surgically implanted device.

As a software engineer, I know technology and how it is advanced. I saw facebook coming a decade before it wss realised. There"s going to be an ecosystem of things on and in the body someday soon. While I will never volunteer or participate in this technology. This is the ultimate form of personalization and will be marketed that way and people will eat it up regardless of the implications. When people realize they have given up their very own cognitive liberties to both corporations and government. There will be nothing you can do about it, much less stop it.
biomystic
Posts: 606
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12/25/2013 6:59:16 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/24/2013 11:56:51 AM, SemperVI wrote:
Read Part I
http://www.debate.org...

When you're trying to compete with the human brain's functioning with electronic circuitry overriding natural brain functioning, e.g eye-hand coordination, you're messing with 3 billion years of evolutionary product testing. The Frankenstein Monster warning as persistent mythos isn't around continuously for no reason.
bornofgod
Posts: 11,322
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12/25/2013 10:41:19 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/24/2013 11:55:21 AM, SemperVI wrote:
This is the second of a two part forum discussion. The second discussion deals with RFID, transhumanism and bio-computing technology.
Transhumanism is the belief or theory that the human race can evolve beyond its current physical and mental limitations, especially by means of science and technology.

Transhumanists support the emergence and convergence of technologies including nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science (NBIC), and hypothetical future technologies including simulated reality, artificial intelligence, superintelligence, mind uploading, chemical brain preservation, and cryonics. They believe that humans can and should use these technologies to become more than human.

Dangerous Things is a website that will sell you electronic chips you can have implanted into your skin. From these chips, you can program a device to do just about anything with the swipe of your hand. The move to outfit people with electronic devices that can be swallowed, implanted in their bodies or attached to their skin via "smart tattoos" could revolutionize the world and change the way people interact with devices and one another. Imagine mentally querying a database on demand or being able to reference any and all information mentally. Critics call the trend intrusive, even sacrilegious. But others say it ultimately will make life better for everybody. Some researchers and executives envision a day when devices placed in people will enable them to control computers, prosthetic devices and many other things solely with their thoughts.

"In the next 10 to 20 years we will see rapid development in bioengineered and man-machine interfaces," predicted Graafstra, who wrote a book about the technology, adding that the trend is going to "push the boundaries of what it means to be human." Many large technology companies and researchers are keenly interested in the topic.

Similar notions are under study by others, including UC Berkeley researchers. In a scholarly paper published in July, they proposed implanting people"s brains with thousands of tiny sensors they called "neural dust."

The idea initially is to have the little circuits gather detailed data on brain functions. But eventually, lead researcher Dongjin Seo said, the electronic swarms may prove useful for "controlling devices via thought" or stimulating malfunctioning brain regions to restore "limb motor control for paralyzed patients."

Last year, Proteus Digital Health of Redwood City won approval to sell a pill that relays information about a person"s vital signs via a mobile phone to their doctor. And officials at Santa Clara-based Intel envision their microchips one day in devices ingested or implanted for medical and other uses.

Some fear implants might become mandatory for health insurance or jobs. This fear is not irrational.

After learning about a Cincinnati video surveillance firm that required employees to have a chip inserted in them, California Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, introduced a bill that became law in 2008 forbidding anyone in this state from making similar demands.

Two years later, when the Virginia House of Delegates passed a similar measure, some of the lawmakers " citing biblical references about the Antichrist " denounced implanted chips as "the mark of the beast."

Nonetheless, Intel futurist Brian David Johnson thinks the public initially will be more amenable to smart tattoos than computerized pills or gadgets inserted into them, because "something on your skin, that"s a baby step" compared to a swallowed or surgically implanted device.

As a software engineer, I know technology and how it is advanced. I saw facebook coming a decade before it wss realised. There"s going to be an ecosystem of things on and in the body someday soon. While I will never volunteer or participate in this technology. This is the ultimate form of personalization and will be marketed that way and people will eat it up regardless of the implications. When people realize they have given up their very own cognitive liberties to both corporations and government. There will be nothing you can do about it, much less stop it.

This strong delusion by our Creator will end soon so there's nothing to worry about.
SemperVI
Posts: 294
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12/25/2013 12:08:12 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/25/2013 6:59:16 AM, biomystic wrote:
At 12/24/2013 11:56:51 AM, SemperVI wrote:
Read Part I
http://www.debate.org...

When you're trying to compete with the human brain's functioning with electronic circuitry overriding natural brain functioning, e.g eye-hand coordination, you're messing with 3 billion years of evolutionary product testing. The Frankenstein Monster warning as persistent mythos isn't around continuously for no reason.

Agreed, just because science and technology can do that something, does not mean we should do that something. Nothing but bad things will come from this.