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Part I: Is RFID to Intrusive?

SemperVI
Posts: 294
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12/24/2013 11:55:39 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
This is the first of a two part forum discussion. The second discussion deals with RFID, transhumanism and bio-computing technology.

At what point will technolgy become to discomforting for you. Could we be constantly tracked through our clothes, shoes, the food we eat, the places we go, the money we spend or even the emotions we experience in the future?

What if this future was already here? Enter RFID. Many of you, if not all of you have heard of this technology. For those who have not. RFID, is an acronym meaning radio frequency identification. RFID tags are miniscule microchips, which already have shrunk to half the size of a grain of sand. They listen for a radio query and respond by transmitting their unique ID code. Most RFID tags have no batteries: They use the power from the initial radio signal to transmit their response.

Some may wonder how such a device could be used. Wal-Mart's commitment to RFID tags indicates the technology is now ready for mass application, with the retail industry becoming the first to adopt it in a big way -- even though it raises some novel privacy concerns for the consumer. Target, Best Buy and othet container retail outlets are also following suit.

Privacy advocates say manufacturers could someday put the tags on single items that are bought by consumers and enter their homes. If that happens, it could allow retailers to track the movement of goods once they leave the store, enabling remote or even surreptitious tracking of products and people's buying habits.

Unfortunately, this someday happened as defined by FCC guideline that has been in place since the 1970"s; waiting for the technology to catch up with the regulations.

The US government has been warning the American public of what they are doing. Most simply are not paying attention. Hidden in plain sight is the means by which we can be monitored. Just look at your alarm clock, coffee maker, stove, cell phone, lap top, microwave oven, smart meter, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, or any electronic device and you will see the FCC disclaimer. Even your child"s electronic toys have the capability to monitor use.

An indicator of these plans can be found on the underside of any electronic device in your home. Even on the underside of a simple calculator, or behind your refrigerator; you will find the following:

"This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation."

What this disclaimer means is that this device is not allowed to jam or block any signals and must accept any incoming signal given (by FCC regulations under Part 15 of the FCC Rules). The reason for this "Rule", is so manufacturers and government can monitor how products are used so to speak.

Don't get me wrong. RFID tags are, on the surface, a useful development and a compelling technology. They permit retailers to slim inventory levels and reduce theft, which one industry group estimates at $50 billion a year. However; the privacy threat comes when RFID tags remain active once you leave a store. That's the scenario that should raise alarms--and currently the RFID industry seems to be giving mixed signals about whether the tags will be disabled or left enabled by default.

If this is not immediately concerning, you should know, In December of 2011, the FCC announced plans to transition unused over-the-air wireless bands into Super Wi-Fi. This super Wi-Fi will use low frequencies (from 470 to 698 megahertz) that have longer wavelengths and travel father; and even penetrate walls.

This super Wi-Fi transmits 15 times the data rate of a 4g LTE cellular signal used by all Androids, smartphones, and iPhones. A simple four-watt commercial transmitter could download and transmit to any device data that extends 2 or 3 miles in a dense city region and up to 40 miles in open spaces.

The majority of super Wi-Fi devices will be available in 2014, however manufacturers are installing super Wi-Fi chips in electronics currently being made as soon as next year. These integrated Wi-Fi technologies will be upgradable when the bulk of the technology is made available to the public.

So what is the real threat. If an appliance, like my refrigerator can monitor the contents of products within, notify me via my smart phone what items to restock or what is expired. How is that a threat to my privacy? To this I say, there is no threat. However, what if this information was shared with your health insurer? What if your auto insurer could base you a high risk driver by how much alcohol you consumed on a weekly, monthly or yearly basis. What if a government run healthcare authority could mandate dietary controls. This only scratches the surface. The real point of this is, at what point does RFID become unacceptable to you?
bornofgod
Posts: 11,322
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12/25/2013 11:05:12 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/24/2013 11:55:39 AM, SemperVI wrote:
This is the first of a two part forum discussion. The second discussion deals with RFID, transhumanism and bio-computing technology.

At what point will technolgy become to discomforting for you. Could we be constantly tracked through our clothes, shoes, the food we eat, the places we go, the money we spend or even the emotions we experience in the future?

What if this future was already here? Enter RFID. Many of you, if not all of you have heard of this technology. For those who have not. RFID, is an acronym meaning radio frequency identification. RFID tags are miniscule microchips, which already have shrunk to half the size of a grain of sand. They listen for a radio query and respond by transmitting their unique ID code. Most RFID tags have no batteries: They use the power from the initial radio signal to transmit their response.

Some may wonder how such a device could be used. Wal-Mart's commitment to RFID tags indicates the technology is now ready for mass application, with the retail industry becoming the first to adopt it in a big way -- even though it raises some novel privacy concerns for the consumer. Target, Best Buy and othet container retail outlets are also following suit.

Privacy advocates say manufacturers could someday put the tags on single items that are bought by consumers and enter their homes. If that happens, it could allow retailers to track the movement of goods once they leave the store, enabling remote or even surreptitious tracking of products and people's buying habits.

Unfortunately, this someday happened as defined by FCC guideline that has been in place since the 1970"s; waiting for the technology to catch up with the regulations.

The US government has been warning the American public of what they are doing. Most simply are not paying attention. Hidden in plain sight is the means by which we can be monitored. Just look at your alarm clock, coffee maker, stove, cell phone, lap top, microwave oven, smart meter, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, or any electronic device and you will see the FCC disclaimer. Even your child"s electronic toys have the capability to monitor use.

An indicator of these plans can be found on the underside of any electronic device in your home. Even on the underside of a simple calculator, or behind your refrigerator; you will find the following:

"This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation."

What this disclaimer means is that this device is not allowed to jam or block any signals and must accept any incoming signal given (by FCC regulations under Part 15 of the FCC Rules). The reason for this "Rule", is so manufacturers and government can monitor how products are used so to speak.

Don't get me wrong. RFID tags are, on the surface, a useful development and a compelling technology. They permit retailers to slim inventory levels and reduce theft, which one industry group estimates at $50 billion a year. However; the privacy threat comes when RFID tags remain active once you leave a store. That's the scenario that should raise alarms--and currently the RFID industry seems to be giving mixed signals about whether the tags will be disabled or left enabled by default.

If this is not immediately concerning, you should know, In December of 2011, the FCC announced plans to transition unused over-the-air wireless bands into Super Wi-Fi. This super Wi-Fi will use low frequencies (from 470 to 698 megahertz) that have longer wavelengths and travel father; and even penetrate walls.

This super Wi-Fi transmits 15 times the data rate of a 4g LTE cellular signal used by all Androids, smartphones, and iPhones. A simple four-watt commercial transmitter could download and transmit to any device data that extends 2 or 3 miles in a dense city region and up to 40 miles in open spaces.

The majority of super Wi-Fi devices will be available in 2014, however manufacturers are installing super Wi-Fi chips in electronics currently being made as soon as next year. These integrated Wi-Fi technologies will be upgradable when the bulk of the technology is made available to the public.

So what is the real threat. If an appliance, like my refrigerator can monitor the contents of products within, notify me via my smart phone what items to restock or what is expired. How is that a threat to my privacy? To this I say, there is no threat. However, what if this information was shared with your health insurer? What if your auto insurer could base you a high risk driver by how much alcohol you consumed on a weekly, monthly or yearly basis. What if a government run healthcare authority could mandate dietary controls. This only scratches the surface. The real point of this is, at what point does RFID become unacceptable to you?

Since I know that everything we see in this world is God's strong delusion to keep His people in fear, I have no fear at all. In fact, I know how, where and when my flesh will be killed by unbelievers who love this world because they are responsible in building God's modern technology, starting with Christians who God used to spread the Roman Empire's building techniques. Now the world is filled with modern technology that God needed His people to build so that He could show me how we were created.
SemperVI
Posts: 294
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12/25/2013 12:13:45 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
@bog: Why do you always make stuff about you? This thread is not about you. If you have nothing to say other talk talk about you and your delusions. Then keep it to yourself. You are without a doubt the most self centered person I have ever encountered.
annanicole
Posts: 19,782
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12/25/2013 6:44:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/25/2013 12:13:45 PM, SemperVI wrote:
@bog: Why do you always make stuff about you? This thread is not about you. If you have nothing to say other talk talk about you and your delusions. Then keep it to yourself. You are without a doubt the most self centered person I have ever encountered.

Semper: "@bog: Why do you always make stuff about you?"

Anna: Because, as you apparently do not understand, it is all about Saint Brad, the homeless twat from Campbell.

Semper: "The real point of this is, at what point does RFID become unacceptable to you?"

Anna: It already is. What will stop it, I believe, is the most effective trump card in the world over the last fifty years: a cry of racism. The absurdity of the cry will most likely not matter: it'll still work.
Madcornishbiker: "No, I don't need a dictionary, I know how scripture uses words and that is all I need to now."
SemperVI
Posts: 294
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12/26/2013 9:54:08 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/25/2013 6:44:13 PM, annanicole wrote:
At 12/25/2013 12:13:45 PM, SemperVI wrote:
@bog: Why do you always make stuff about you? This thread is not about you. If you have nothing to say other talk talk about you and your delusions. Then keep it to yourself. You are without a doubt the most self centered person I have ever encountered.

Semper: "@bog: Why do you always make stuff about you?"

Anna: Because, as you apparently do not understand, it is all about Saint Brad, the homeless twat from Campbell.

Semper: "The real point of this is, at what point does RFID become unacceptable to you?"

Anna: It already is. What will stop it, I believe, is the most effective trump card in the world over the last fifty years: a cry of racism. The absurdity of the cry will most likely not matter: it'll still work.

I can't argue the effectiveness of the race card yet I really think people just don't care. They have bought into the myth "Nothing to hide, nothing to fear" . A fallacy, a trojan horse wheeled out by those who can't justify their surveillance schemes. It is an argument that insults intelligent individuals and disregards the reality of building and operating an IT system, a business or even a government.
bornofgod
Posts: 11,322
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12/26/2013 10:04:45 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/25/2013 12:13:45 PM, SemperVI wrote:
@bog: Why do you always make stuff about you? This thread is not about you. If you have nothing to say other talk talk about you and your delusions. Then keep it to yourself. You are without a doubt the most self centered person I have ever encountered.

That's because you don't know who I AM, yet. As long as you believe that I AM speaking from a man's point of view, then you won't believe that I AM the past, present and future.
bornofgod
Posts: 11,322
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12/26/2013 10:07:14 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/25/2013 6:44:13 PM, annanicole wrote:
At 12/25/2013 12:13:45 PM, SemperVI wrote:
@bog: Why do you always make stuff about you? This thread is not about you. If you have nothing to say other talk talk about you and your delusions. Then keep it to yourself. You are without a doubt the most self centered person I have ever encountered.

Semper: "@bog: Why do you always make stuff about you?"

Anna: Because, as you apparently do not understand, it is all about Saint Brad, the homeless twat from Campbell.

Semper: "The real point of this is, at what point does RFID become unacceptable to you?"

Anna: It already is. What will stop it, I believe, is the most effective trump card in the world over the last fifty years: a cry of racism. The absurdity of the cry will most likely not matter: it'll still work.

It's apparent that you do NOT know who I AM. You're an unbeliever who only believes in your own interpretations and not from WHOM I AM, the past, present and future.