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An Undying Root

s-anthony
Posts: 2,582
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2/24/2014 2:14:06 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I noticed something, yesterday, while walking home from church. I noticed how, almost cartoonish, some lower income urban black young adults were dressed. I've notice this, in the past, and not exclusively among young black people but, also, other ethic groups. The men were wearing very baggy jeans and T-shirts, to the point of being uncomfortably too big, while the women were wearing skintight clothing that exposed every fold, curve, nook, and cranny of their physique. I have worked with black people, in the past, who not only thought it was unstylish for a man to wear form-fitting clothing but rather it was obscene.

In saying that, I was reminded of how, in the past, women were expected to wear dresses, while men wore pants. Not only was this a cultural norm, it was encoded into the religious dialogue of the day. It makes me wonder, have we merely replaced dresses with some other dress code. Maybe one that's not religiously addressed, but one that is expected, nonetheless.

Someone brought up the fact religion seems to have a lesser role than its played in the past. However, I see religious symbolism as merely a way to characterize deeply held beliefs and traditions, beliefs and traditions at the very root of civilization. Beliefs that define the roles of various members and functions of society. Even though we may accomplish that which has been seen as the insurmountable task of ridding ourselves of religious coloring books, the mechanisms of society cannot so easily be destroyed; and, they will continue to appear in subtle and not so subtle ways, yet with various trappings and characterizations.

When you think you've conquered the mechanistic machinations of a common and universal heritage, that is the very time the collective unconsciousness has conquered you.
biomystic
Posts: 606
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2/24/2014 7:29:52 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
a-Yup. That there Collective Unconscious is powerful stuff. Some even think It's God and they will be right. Religion is the way human beings organize their most important emotions. But the organization follows our evolutionary traits as animals needing to show our true "colors" to mark each others territories. This is social behavior of human beings which guarantees diversity of communities and people's each seeking to be unique and special yet part of a community group. Humans as social animals or humans as spiritual beings, take your pick, it's all the same in the long run..
s-anthony
Posts: 2,582
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2/24/2014 11:06:01 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/24/2014 7:29:52 PM, biomystic wrote:
a-Yup. That there Collective Unconscious is powerful stuff. Some even think It's God and they will be right. Religion is the way human beings organize their most important emotions. But the organization follows our evolutionary traits as animals needing to show our true "colors" to mark each others territories. This is social behavior of human beings which guarantees diversity of communities and people's each seeking to be unique and special yet part of a community group. Humans as social animals or humans as spiritual beings, take your pick, it's all the same in the long run..

I agree wholeheartedly. It's a defense mechanism, for the identity, of the group, and the identity of the individual. However, I believe the identity of the group is often in conflict with individual identities. The weaker individual identity is absorbed by the collective, while the stronger individualistic identities are often in disagreement with the collective. The cultural theist worships the mechanistic underpinnings of one's society, regarding his, or her, role as sacred and valued, by the community. The cultural atheist is profane and sees himself, or herself, as such; and, in his, or her, profanity takes great delight, raising up all that's dark and hidden to sacred heights and bringing down the strongholds of the beatified to waste and destruction.

Remember, these ideas are not to be taken literally, but figuratively. "God", to the theist and the atheist is one and the same thing..."the collective". The theist fulfills his, or her, sacred duty, by reinforcing the ties that bind, making God more coherent and prominent in the hearts of others. While to the atheist, his, or her, sacred obligation is best served by sowing seeds of doubt and discord, thereby loosening the cords of unity, in effect causing the disintegration of the collective.

The constant tug, back and forth, between the theist (or collective) and the atheist (or individual) is beneficial, to the creation of both. In Jungian psychology, "God" is defined, by his very shadow.