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Debating the Trinity

InquireTruth
Posts: 723
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4/25/2014 1:03:43 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Before I spend my o-so-precious time typing out a highly condensed (and thus harder) argument against formulaic expressions of the Trinity, I decided to gauge interest.

Would anybody be interested in debating something like the following?:
No epistemic formulae are sufficient in providing adequate explications of the Trinity

I would take the position (PRO) that there is not. I know this topic is not too specialized for some people on this website but it must catch their interest first.

To be clear, while I believe there are no adequate, formulaic expressions of the Trinity, I do believe in it because of its biblical merit.
philochristos
Posts: 2,614
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4/25/2014 9:28:36 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
You might ask radz. He's pretty interested in the doctrine of the Trinity. It's almost all he ever debates.

http://www.debate.org...
"Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education." ~Aristotle

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~Aristotle
annanicole
Posts: 19,787
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4/25/2014 5:21:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/25/2014 1:03:43 AM, InquireTruth wrote:
Before I spend my o-so-precious time typing out a highly condensed (and thus harder) argument against formulaic expressions of the Trinity, I decided to gauge interest.

Would anybody be interested in debating something like the following?:
No epistemic formulae are sufficient in providing adequate explications of the Trinity

I would take the position (PRO) that there is not. I know this topic is not too specialized for some people on this website but it must catch their interest first.

To be clear, while I believe there are no adequate, formulaic expressions of the Trinity, I do believe in it because of its biblical merit.

It depends upon one's definition of "adequate" up there.
Madcornishbiker: "No, I don't need a dictionary, I know how scripture uses words and that is all I need to now."
matt.mcguire88
Posts: 1,137
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4/25/2014 5:32:56 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/25/2014 1:03:43 AM, InquireTruth wrote:
Before I spend my o-so-precious time typing out a highly condensed (and thus harder) argument against formulaic expressions of the Trinity, I decided to gauge interest.

Would anybody be interested in debating something like the following?:
No epistemic formulae are sufficient in providing adequate explications of the Trinity

I would take the position (PRO) that there is not. I know this topic is not too specialized for some people on this website but it must catch their interest first.

To be clear, while I believe there are no adequate, formulaic expressions of the Trinity, I do believe in it because of its biblical merit.

U.N.I.T.Y
radz
Posts: 5
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1/31/2015 6:51:10 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/25/2014 1:03:43 AM, InquireTruth wrote:
Before I spend my o-so-precious time typing out a highly condensed (and thus harder) argument against formulaic expressions of the Trinity, I decided to gauge interest.

Would anybody be interested in debating something like the following?:
No epistemic formulae are sufficient in providing adequate explications of the Trinity

I would take the position (PRO) that there is not. I know this topic is not too specialized for some people on this website but it must catch their interest first.

To be clear, while I believe there are no adequate, formulaic expressions of the Trinity, I do believe in it because of its biblical merit.

The Nicene Creed ( A.D. 325 original version) has its idea rooted firmly from the New Testament Scriptures. It shows the usefulness of the Greek word HOMOOUSIOS ( of same substance;nature) in defining the relationship of Christ with God the Father in terms of nature ( set of attributes).

For example, John 10:28-30 clearly shows that the Father and the Son have the same powerful hand and that this is the oneness or sameness they have [" Jesus said: I give them eternal life... My hand...my Father's hand...I and my Father are one".] Take note that Deuteronomy 32:39 clearly speaks of Yahweh as the only Deity who has a powerful hand and who gives life.

On the other hand, there is not one creed that clearly elucidates the oneness of the Holy Spirit with the Father and the Son. What do we only have is the affirmation of his divine name , origin and worthiness of worship as the means of explicating his nature ( e.g. Nicene Creed A.D. 381 version, " ...the Holy Spirit, the Lord and the giver of life, who proceeded from the Father, who with the Father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified...")
radz
Posts: 5
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1/31/2015 7:12:05 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
The Nicene Creed ( A.D. 325 original version) captures the very idea of New Testament Teaching about Jesus' Godhood. It shows the usefulness of the Greek word HOMOOUSIOS ( of same substance;nature) in defining the relationship of Christ with God the Father in terms of nature ( set of attributes). The said word encapsulates the very idea of ontological equality. I do believe that the formulaic expression of the Creed has its source from systematic theology and it really does adequately and faithfully presented the High Christology of the NT.

John 10:28-30 clearly shows that the Father and the Son have the same powerful hand and that this is the oneness or sameness they have [" Jesus said: I give them eternal life... My hand...my Father's hand...I and my Father are one".] Take note that Deuteronomy 32:39 clearly speaks of Yahweh as the only Deity who has a powerful hand and who gives life.

On the other hand, there is not one creed that clearly elucidates the oneness of the Holy Spirit with the Father and the Son. What do we only have is the affirmation of his divine name , origin and worthiness of worship as the means of explicating his nature ( Nicene Creed A.D. 381 version, " ...the Holy Spirit, the Lord and the giver of life, who proceeded from the Father, who with the Father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified...").