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What is Universal Morality?

NiqashMotawadi3
Posts: 1,895
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5/23/2014 4:26:40 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/22/2014 7:34:14 PM, ChristianPunk wrote:
Can anybody explain this one for me?

It means there exists categorical norms, morals that are universal, reason-giving and normative, such as "You shouldn't do X. Period."

An example of a system of universal morality is probably Divine Command theory, that says that everything God commanded as good is moral in the whole universe no matter the circumstances.
Schzincko
Posts: 119
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5/24/2014 12:21:06 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Really, it just breaks down to majority opinion. If something is done by an individual in a group, and it defies what most in the group think to be the right way (respectful and/or responsible), then it's likely to be considered immoral.

I guess, basically, a better way to explain is to say that morals come from a mindful judgment base. If somebody is offended, it's immoral.

Personally, I don't even think morals should be in the religion section, because it suggests that religions have the rights to morals (which they don't).
SemperVI
Posts: 294
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5/24/2014 1:27:59 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/22/2014 7:34:14 PM, ChristianPunk wrote:
Can anybody explain this one for me?

Universal morality is an objective morality independent of conscientiousness. Universal morality is unattainable by you and I. It is difficult to understand this because we are burdened with conscious thought. Accordingly, when we do think of morality it becomes a paradox.

Moral worth is contingent upon conditions that morality is obliged to try to eliminate. The purpose of true morality is to eliminate certain conditions (suffering and grievous wrongs). Yet, only if those conditions exist can they call forth the moral actions that uniquely confer moral value. Paradoxically, morality is the enemy of moral worth.

Saul Smilansky
Professor of Philosophy
University of Haifa, Israel

In other words, you gain moral worth by slaying dragons. But slay enough of them and you will find that there are no more to slay. Nor can you can create them, to slay them. That would be morally unworthy thus giving you no moral worth.