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Cosmological Argument for Existence of God

SS-Maynes
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6/18/2014 10:57:51 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
The following Cosmological Argument is excerpted from my draft book (see Preview at www.religiouspluralism.ca). No less a critic than Immanuel Kant said that it is impossible to avoid the conclusion that if something exists, then something exists necessarily. In other words, not all things can be contingent, but there must be some necessary being.

Then, either there is a First Cause, which is God transcendent; or else the universe is eternally recreating itself, which is God immanent. God may be either the one or the other, or some combination of both. If it is a combination, then all three explanations may be true in different respects. To preserve systematic unity, each explanatory factor might be an expression of One God manifest in three dimensions or personae: God the prime creator, God the supreme being, and God the ultimate unconditioned (limitless) source/destiny of all that is.

If this Trinity is the necessary and sufficient cause of itself, then this threefold expression of divinity must be inseparably united, with the three personae existing all at once and simultaneously, in order to complete the circle of creation out of nothing but the idea of each other, and reason itself.

Thus there may be a Causal Loop, in which case the beginning is also the ending, and the universe may be periodically creating itself. Causal loops are impossible if time is a linear sequence of cause and effect stretching eternally into the past, and infinitely into the future. However, a loop may be possible if time has a beginning from nothing at some point in the past, and an ending in "nothing" at some point in the future. Creation ex nihilo (out of nothing) - the Deity is originally an existential potential and his Universe becomes eventually an experiential actual.

Based on observations of the expanding universe and other evidence, the Big Bang theory suggests that about 14 billion years ago the universe exploded into existence out of an infinitesimal singularity, and this constitutes the beginning of the universe, i.e. matter, energy, space, time, and all physical laws out of nothing. Now, if entropy eventually reduces the universe to "undifferentiated sameness, which is indistinguishable from nothingness" (Eddington), then the destiny of the universe may be virtually the same as its beginning.

Therefore, from the universe point of view, the explanation of reality may be a causal loop which creates itself periodically as some sort of systematic unity or "gestalt" of energy and consciousness, with the pinnacle of this "creation" amounting to a Universe Allsoul or Supreme Being, who is God (or a personification of God).

It has been said that "nothing comes from nothing," but the three persons of the Trinity apparently solve this metaphysical problem by sharing the Absolute in a united construct of mutual support, depending only on the notion of each other and the "force" of pure and practical reason. In abstract terms, these three absolutes of creation may be called the Deity Absolute, the Universe Absolute Supreme Being, and the Unconditioned Absolute Spirit of Consummation.

Samuel Stuart Maynes
www.religiouspluralism.ca
Envisage
Posts: 3,646
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6/18/2014 11:13:50 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 6/18/2014 10:57:51 AM, SS-Maynes wrote:
The following Cosmological Argument is excerpted from my draft book (see Preview at www.religiouspluralism.ca). No less a critic than Immanuel Kant said that it is impossible to avoid the conclusion that if something exists, then something exists necessarily. In other words, not all things can be contingent, but there must be some necessary being.

Then, either there is a First Cause, which is God transcendent; or else the universe is eternally recreating itself, which is God immanent. God may be either the one or the other, or some combination of both. If it is a combination, then all three explanations may be true in different respects. To preserve systematic unity, each explanatory factor might be an expression of One God manifest in three dimensions or personae: God the prime creator, God the supreme being, and God the ultimate unconditioned (limitless) source/destiny of all that is.

If this Trinity is the necessary and sufficient cause of itself, then this threefold expression of divinity must be inseparably united, with the three personae existing all at once and simultaneously, in order to complete the circle of creation out of nothing but the idea of each other, and reason itself.

Thus there may be a Causal Loop, in which case the beginning is also the ending, and the universe may be periodically creating itself. Causal loops are impossible if time is a linear sequence of cause and effect stretching eternally into the past, and infinitely into the future. However, a loop may be possible if time has a beginning from nothing at some point in the past, and an ending in "nothing" at some point in the future. Creation ex nihilo (out of nothing) - the Deity is originally an existential potential and his Universe becomes eventually an experiential actual.

Based on observations of the expanding universe and other evidence, the Big Bang theory suggests that about 14 billion years ago the universe exploded into existence out of an infinitesimal singularity, and this constitutes the beginning of the universe, i.e. matter, energy, space, time, and all physical laws out of nothing. Now, if entropy eventually reduces the universe to "undifferentiated sameness, which is indistinguishable from nothingness" (Eddington), then the destiny of the universe may be virtually the same as its beginning.

Therefore, from the universe point of view, the explanation of reality may be a causal loop which creates itself periodically as some sort of systematic unity or "gestalt" of energy and consciousness, with the pinnacle of this "creation" amounting to a Universe Allsoul or Supreme Being, who is God (or a personification of God).

It has been said that "nothing comes from nothing," but the three persons of the Trinity apparently solve this metaphysical problem by sharing the Absolute in a united construct of mutual support, depending only on the notion of each other and the "force" of pure and practical reason. In abstract terms, these three absolutes of creation may be called the Deity Absolute, the Universe Absolute Supreme Being, and the Unconditioned Absolute Spirit of Consummation.

Samuel Stuart Maynes
www.religiouspluralism.ca

You still trying to publish that book after 5 years?
http://www.shroomery.org...
Drayson
Posts: 288
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6/18/2014 5:26:58 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 6/18/2014 10:57:51 AM, SS-Maynes wrote:
The following Cosmological Argument is excerpted from my draft book (see Preview at www.religiouspluralism.ca). No less a critic than Immanuel Kant said that it is impossible to avoid the conclusion that if something exists, then something exists necessarily. In other words, not all things can be contingent, but there must be some necessary being.

Then, either there is a First Cause, which is God transcendent; or else the universe is eternally recreating itself, which is God immanent. God may be either the one or the other, or some combination of both. If it is a combination, then all three explanations may be true in different respects. To preserve systematic unity, each explanatory factor might be an expression of One God manifest in three dimensions or personae: God the prime creator, God the supreme being, and God the ultimate unconditioned (limitless) source/destiny of all that is.

If this Trinity is the necessary and sufficient cause of itself, then this threefold expression of divinity must be inseparably united, with the three personae existing all at once and simultaneously, in order to complete the circle of creation out of nothing but the idea of each other, and reason itself.

Thus there may be a Causal Loop, in which case the beginning is also the ending, and the universe may be periodically creating itself. Causal loops are impossible if time is a linear sequence of cause and effect stretching eternally into the past, and infinitely into the future. However, a loop may be possible if time has a beginning from nothing at some point in the past, and an ending in "nothing" at some point in the future. Creation ex nihilo (out of nothing) - the Deity is originally an existential potential and his Universe becomes eventually an experiential actual.

Based on observations of the expanding universe and other evidence, the Big Bang theory suggests that about 14 billion years ago the universe exploded into existence out of an infinitesimal singularity, and this constitutes the beginning of the universe, i.e. matter, energy, space, time, and all physical laws out of nothing. Now, if entropy eventually reduces the universe to "undifferentiated sameness, which is indistinguishable from nothingness" (Eddington), then the destiny of the universe may be virtually the same as its beginning.

Therefore, from the universe point of view, the explanation of reality may be a causal loop which creates itself periodically as some sort of systematic unity or "gestalt" of energy and consciousness, with the pinnacle of this "creation" amounting to a Universe Allsoul or Supreme Being, who is God (or a personification of God).

It has been said that "nothing comes from nothing," but the three persons of the Trinity apparently solve this metaphysical problem by sharing the Absolute in a united construct of mutual support, depending only on the notion of each other and the "force" of pure and practical reason. In abstract terms, these three absolutes of creation may be called the Deity Absolute, the Universe Absolute Supreme Being, and the Unconditioned Absolute Spirit of Consummation.

Samuel Stuart Maynes
www.religiouspluralism.ca

I'm going to call nonsense - I don't believe Kant said any such thing as what you attribute to him in your first paragraph. He firmly rejected such logic and explained in detail why. You didn't even use a quote, you just state "Kant said this"

So if this is really a book you're writing, be aware that very first paragraph completely fails and any educated person will immediately stop reading.
"I'm not saying I don't trust you...and I'm not saying I do. But I don't"

-Topper Harley
SS-Maynes
Posts: 11
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6/24/2014 12:34:01 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 6/18/2014 5:26:58 PM, Drayson wrote:
I don't believe Kant said any such thing as what you attribute to him in your first paragraph. He firmly rejected such logic and explained in detail why. You didn't even use a quote, you just state "Kant said this"
I"m not surprised that you"ve challenged me. Kant is widely misunderstood, and his views have been seriously distorted by partisans intent on their own atheist agenda. In fact, Kant believed in the existence of God, he makes a great teleological argument, and his moral argument is a masterpiece of synthetic a priori logic, but I digress. Regarding the cosmological argument, the actual quote is as follows, i.e.:

"It is something very remarkable that, on the supposition that something exists, I cannot avoid the inference that something exists necessarily." Critique of Pure Reason " I. Kant, P.A614/B643.

So that you won"t think I"m taking this out of context, let me give the essence of Kant"s very subtle and sophisticated argument, in his own words before and after the "smoking gun" quotation, i.e.:

"Unconditioned necessity, which, as the ultimate support of all existing things, is an indispensable requirement, is an abyss on the verge of which human reason tremble in dismay... The transcendental object which forms the basis of appearances... is and must ever remain hidden from us... it must, as a mere idea, be based on the constitution of reason itself, and on this account must be capable of explanation and solution... Now what is the cause of this unavoidable step on the part of reason, of admitting that some one among all existing things must be necessary?

"Upon this perfectly natural - but not on that account reliable - inference does the cosmological argument rest. But, let me form any concept whatever of a thing, I find that I cannot think the existence of the thing as absolutely necessary, and that nothing prevents me, be the thing or being what it may, from thinking its non-existence. I may thus be obliged to admit that all existing things have a necessary basis, while I cannot think any single or individual thing as necessary... But if all that we perceive must be regarded as conditionally necessary, it is impossible that anything which is empirically given should be absolutely necessary. It follows from this, that you must accept the absolutely necessary as outside the world (of appearances), inasmuch as it is useful only as a principle of the highest possible unity in experience, and you cannot discover any such necessary existence in the world,,," Critique of Pure Reason - I. Kant, P.A613/B641-A616/B644.

Samuel Stuart Maynes
www.religiouspluralism.ca
lifemeansevolutionisgood
Posts: 551
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6/24/2014 1:43:04 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 6/18/2014 10:57:51 AM, SS-Maynes wrote:
The following Cosmological Argument is excerpted from my draft book (see Preview at www.religiouspluralism.ca). No less a critic than Immanuel Kant said that it is impossible to avoid the conclusion that if something exists, then something exists necessarily. In other words, not all things can be contingent, but there must be some necessary being.

Then, either there is a First Cause, which is God transcendent; or else the universe is eternally recreating itself, which is God immanent. God may be either the one or the other, or some combination of both. If it is a combination, then all three explanations may be true in different respects. To preserve systematic unity, each explanatory factor might be an expression of One God manifest in three dimensions or personae: God the prime creator, God the supreme being, and God the ultimate unconditioned (limitless) source/destiny of all that is.

Deductive argument against a first cause:
1) Cause and effect happen in time
2) Time started at the big bang
3) There was no time before the big bang
4) The big bang does not have a cause

Extended to be against god:
5) Theism requires god to have caused the universe's existence
6) The universe does not have a cause
7) Theism is false.

If this Trinity is the necessary and sufficient cause of itself, then this threefold expression of divinity must be inseparably united, with the three personae existing all at once and simultaneously, in order to complete the circle of creation out of nothing but the idea of each other, and reason itself.

Thus there may be a Causal Loop, in which case the beginning is also the ending, and the universe may be periodically creating itself. Causal loops are impossible if time is a linear sequence of cause and effect stretching eternally into the past, and infinitely into the future. However, a loop may be possible if time has a beginning from nothing at some point in the past, and an ending in "nothing" at some point in the future. Creation ex nihilo (out of nothing) - the Deity is originally an existential potential and his Universe becomes eventually an experiential actual.

The only thing that has had creation ex nihilo was the universe, so therefore it is illogical to assume you can know how creation ex nihilo works.

Based on observations of the expanding universe and other evidence, the Big Bang theory suggests that about 14 billion years ago the universe exploded into existence out of an infinitesimal singularity, and this constitutes the beginning of the universe, i.e. matter, energy, space, time, and all physical laws out of nothing. Now, if entropy eventually reduces the universe to "undifferentiated sameness, which is indistinguishable from nothingness" (Eddington), then the destiny of the universe may be virtually the same as its beginning.

Therefore, from the universe point of view, the explanation of reality may be a causal loop which creates itself periodically as some sort of systematic unity or "gestalt" of energy and consciousness, with the pinnacle of this "creation" amounting to a Universe Allsoul or Supreme Being, who is God (or a personification of God).

It has been said that "nothing comes from nothing," but the three persons of the Trinity apparently solve this metaphysical problem by sharing the Absolute in a united construct of mutual support, depending only on the notion of each other and the "force" of pure and practical reason. In abstract terms, these three absolutes of creation may be called the Deity Absolute, the Universe Absolute Supreme Being, and the Unconditioned Absolute Spirit of Consummation.

Samuel Stuart Maynes
www.religiouspluralism.ca