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Do you really feel the spirit?

TUF
Posts: 21,309
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7/30/2014 3:02:30 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
My sister just left on her mission, and because she is my sibling and I love her, I of course went to all her Church functions where she would give talks prior to leaving on her mission.

But one thing she says a lot, and another thing I noticed a lot of religious people say, is that they "Feel the spirit", IE god, Jesus, the holy ghost, etc, whatever your religion refers to it as. This really drives me crazy though, because I don't know what exactly "feeling the spirit" entails or actually means, and I cannot get a straight answer from someone about it that makes sense to me.

This is a central argument I have noticed Christians will resort to also, when defending their beliefs. When explaining how they know their church is true, they often describe it as having felt "God's" presence, or say that they have communicated with him in prayer. To which I ask God verbally communicated with you? Usually people will respond by saying that they felt him and soon got a bit of good luck that consisted with whatever they were looking for in their prayer, and use that as evidence that they felt God.

Here's the problem... throughout the sixteen years I was religous, I never "felt" the spirit. I said I did all the time. Why? Because I couldn't possibly be the only person who didn't feel it right? I was taught that by praying and doing the things my religion told me to do, I was being good. I thought perhaps the feelings I had of satisfaction in doing things people told me would make God happy, was the spirit. If I cried at any motivational speech in church or felt any sort of emotion, myself and others would always instantly describe it as "feeling the spirit" or the spirit is in the room with us.

As I am older now, I think that it is kind of silly that I had previously attached instinctual human emotions and instincts felt daily by Christians and atheists all over the world, to that of something supernatural.

Are there any religious individuals who claim to have felt the spirit, felt God or some other entities presence, etc?

If so can you explain the "feeling" or experience, and why it makes you sure that your religion is true without a doubt?

This thread is intended for discussion, understanding, and potentially respectable debate. I promise to be open-minded however, as I am generally curious to find what people are feeling, and to see if it differed at all from what I would claim when religious.
"I've got to go and grab a shirt" ~ Airmax1227
bulproof
Posts: 25,250
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7/30/2014 3:09:29 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/30/2014 3:02:30 AM, TUF wrote:
My sister just left on her mission, and because she is my sibling and I love her, I of course went to all her Church functions where she would give talks prior to leaving on her mission.

But one thing she says a lot, and another thing I noticed a lot of religious people say, is that they "Feel the spirit", IE god, Jesus, the holy ghost, etc, whatever your religion refers to it as. This really drives me crazy though, because I don't know what exactly "feeling the spirit" entails or actually means, and I cannot get a straight answer from someone about it that makes sense to me.

This is a central argument I have noticed Christians will resort to also, when defending their beliefs. When explaining how they know their church is true, they often describe it as having felt "God's" presence, or say that they have communicated with him in prayer. To which I ask God verbally communicated with you? Usually people will respond by saying that they felt him and soon got a bit of good luck that consisted with whatever they were looking for in their prayer, and use that as evidence that they felt God.

Here's the problem... throughout the sixteen years I was religous, I never "felt" the spirit. I said I did all the time. Why? Because I couldn't possibly be the only person who didn't feel it right? I was taught that by praying and doing the things my religion told me to do, I was being good. I thought perhaps the feelings I had of satisfaction in doing things people told me would make God happy, was the spirit. If I cried at any motivational speech in church or felt any sort of emotion, myself and others would always instantly describe it as "feeling the spirit" or the spirit is in the room with us.

As I am older now, I think that it is kind of silly that I had previously attached instinctual human emotions and instincts felt daily by Christians and atheists all over the world, to that of something supernatural.

Are there any religious individuals who claim to have felt the spirit, felt God or some other entities presence, etc?

If so can you explain the "feeling" or experience, and why it makes you sure that your religion is true without a doubt?

This thread is intended for discussion, understanding, and potentially respectable debate. I promise to be open-minded however, as I am generally curious to find what people are feeling, and to see if it differed at all from what I would claim when religious.

Very good post, I look forward to some responses.
Religion is just mind control. George Carlin
TUF
Posts: 21,309
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7/30/2014 3:14:59 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/30/2014 3:09:29 AM, bulproof wrote:
Very good post, I look forward to some responses.

Thanks!
"I've got to go and grab a shirt" ~ Airmax1227
bluesteel
Posts: 12,301
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7/30/2014 3:25:55 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/30/2014 3:02:30 AM, TUF wrote:
My sister just left on her mission, and because she is my sibling and I love her, I of course went to all her Church functions where she would give talks prior to leaving on her mission.

But one thing she says a lot, and another thing I noticed a lot of religious people say, is that they "Feel the spirit", IE god, Jesus, the holy ghost, etc, whatever your religion refers to it as. This really drives me crazy though, because I don't know what exactly "feeling the spirit" entails or actually means, and I cannot get a straight answer from someone about it that makes sense to me.

This is a central argument I have noticed Christians will resort to also, when defending their beliefs. When explaining how they know their church is true, they often describe it as having felt "God's" presence, or say that they have communicated with him in prayer. To which I ask God verbally communicated with you? Usually people will respond by saying that they felt him and soon got a bit of good luck that consisted with whatever they were looking for in their prayer, and use that as evidence that they felt God.

Here's the problem... throughout the sixteen years I was religous, I never "felt" the spirit. I said I did all the time. Why? Because I couldn't possibly be the only person who didn't feel it right? I was taught that by praying and doing the things my religion told me to do, I was being good. I thought perhaps the feelings I had of satisfaction in doing things people told me would make God happy, was the spirit. If I cried at any motivational speech in church or felt any sort of emotion, myself and others would always instantly describe it as "feeling the spirit" or the spirit is in the room with us.

As I am older now, I think that it is kind of silly that I had previously attached instinctual human emotions and instincts felt daily by Christians and atheists all over the world, to that of something supernatural.

Are there any religious individuals who claim to have felt the spirit, felt God or some other entities presence, etc?

If so can you explain the "feeling" or experience, and why it makes you sure that your religion is true without a doubt?

This thread is intended for discussion, understanding, and potentially respectable debate. I promise to be open-minded however, as I am generally curious to find what people are feeling, and to see if it differed at all from what I would claim when religious.

Peer pressure and self-delusion are two of the greatest forces known to man... It doesn't surprise me that so many people claim they feel the spirit.
You can't reason someone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into - Jonathan Swift (paraphrase)
TUF
Posts: 21,309
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7/30/2014 6:44:20 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/30/2014 3:25:55 AM, bluesteel wrote:
Peer pressure and self-delusion are two of the greatest forces known to man... It doesn't surprise me that so many people claim they feel the spirit.

I tend to agree.
"I've got to go and grab a shirt" ~ Airmax1227
matt.mcguire88
Posts: 1,137
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7/30/2014 11:34:57 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
If you love your sister and recognize that she is not "delusional" or nuts you should respect what she has to say, God made feelings, emotions and expressions ect. of course He can operate this way, it should be a no brainer... however it is just an opinion.

The problem is, is that any "feelings" or experiences with God on a personal level are simply that, but they are dismissed on the basis of objective evidence , this kind of evidence is not compatible with things of the spirit, and this is why more honest Christians tend to leave these aspects out of debate simply because there is no way to prove something of this nature.
It wouldn't matter how I described the spirit or how it operates and what the scriptures reveal, it will be rejected because it does not fall into the "objective evidence" category, and it doesn't help the situation when there are religious coo coos running loose on DDO and else where, unfortunately there are lunatics regardless of religion.
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
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7/30/2014 12:16:59 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/30/2014 3:02:30 AM, TUF wrote:

But one thing she says a lot, and another thing I noticed a lot of religious people say, is that they "Feel the spirit", IE god, Jesus, the holy ghost, etc, whatever your religion refers to it as. This really drives me crazy though, because I don't know what exactly "feeling the spirit" entails or actually means, and I cannot get a straight answer from someone about it that makes sense to me.

This is something I actually had a problem with a few years back. Judging from how everyone spoke about religion, I kept expecting some vision to come to me or an overwhelming spiritual feeling. In short, I suppose I was expecting a miracle. Needless to say, I didn't get one, so I was disappointed. I questioned my beliefs and wondered if God was real, a natural process and a good one. Questioning is good.


This thread is intended for discussion, understanding, and potentially respectable debate. I promise to be open-minded however, as I am generally curious to find what people are feeling, and to see if it differed at all from what I would claim when religious.

Despite the fact that I don't feel any amazing or powerful force that affects me when I pray or meditate, I do gain insight. I learn. I grow from the experience on how I should live my life and treat others. No, I don't have a revelation or an epiphany and there is no magical wisdom that falls upon me. Whether or not people actually experience these things, I have no idea. But when I read scriptures of religions or read a prayer and I study the words, their meaning, and their impact, I grow spiritually and intellectually from the experience. And every now and then, I have an "aha!" moment where I think "So that's what he meant!"

The best feeling I've ever gotten has been through acts of service. When I'm cleaning the environment or donating food/money or helping the elderly, I get a feeling like I'm doing something worthwhile and good. It's hard to explain. It's not just a nice feeling, it's something different, but I'm sure most people have experienced it before if they've ever done any kind of service just for the sake of doing it.

In the end, I've learned not to expect these things and consider it ridiculous to do so (though if you do experience them, then that's all good too). Instead, try to be a better person based off religious teachings and help other people be better as well, while trying to live my life as a life of service toward humanity. That's the best feeling I can get, I suppose.
Truth_seeker
Posts: 1,811
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7/30/2014 2:07:54 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/30/2014 3:02:30 AM, TUF wrote:
My sister just left on her mission, and because she is my sibling and I love her, I of course went to all her Church functions where she would give talks prior to leaving on her mission.

But one thing she says a lot, and another thing I noticed a lot of religious people say, is that they "Feel the spirit", IE god, Jesus, the holy ghost, etc, whatever your religion refers to it as. This really drives me crazy though, because I don't know what exactly "feeling the spirit" entails or actually means, and I cannot get a straight answer from someone about it that makes sense to me.

This is a central argument I have noticed Christians will resort to also, when defending their beliefs. When explaining how they know their church is true, they often describe it as having felt "God's" presence, or say that they have communicated with him in prayer. To which I ask God verbally communicated with you? Usually people will respond by saying that they felt him and soon got a bit of good luck that consisted with whatever they were looking for in their prayer, and use that as evidence that they felt God.

Here's the problem... throughout the sixteen years I was religous, I never "felt" the spirit. I said I did all the time. Why? Because I couldn't possibly be the only person who didn't feel it right? I was taught that by praying and doing the things my religion told me to do, I was being good. I thought perhaps the feelings I had of satisfaction in doing things people told me would make God happy, was the spirit. If I cried at any motivational speech in church or felt any sort of emotion, myself and others would always instantly describe it as "feeling the spirit" or the spirit is in the room with us.

As I am older now, I think that it is kind of silly that I had previously attached instinctual human emotions and instincts felt daily by Christians and atheists all over the world, to that of something supernatural.

Are there any religious individuals who claim to have felt the spirit, felt God or some other entities presence, etc?

If so can you explain the "feeling" or experience, and why it makes you sure that your religion is true without a doubt?

This thread is intended for discussion, understanding, and potentially respectable debate. I promise to be open-minded however, as I am generally curious to find what people are feeling, and to see if it differed at all from what I would claim when religious.

When i repent of my sins, seek God with my heart, and simply pray and read his Word, his Spirit just comes to me and fills me with power, peace, encouragement, love, God's goodness, all the good things in life. Sometimes i feel like i'm high and have too much ahaha, but you can never have too much of God. You just don't care about anything, all your problems are gone, no worries, you feel overjoyed and so at peace with everything around you as you love God more.
annanicole
Posts: 19,787
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7/30/2014 5:37:17 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/30/2014 3:02:30 AM, TUF wrote:
My sister just left on her mission, and because she is my sibling and I love her, I of course went to all her Church functions where she would give talks prior to leaving on her mission.

But one thing she says a lot, and another thing I noticed a lot of religious people say, is that they "Feel the spirit", IE god, Jesus, the holy ghost, etc, whatever your religion refers to it as. This really drives me crazy though, because I don't know what exactly "feeling the spirit" entails or actually means, and I cannot get a straight answer from someone about it that makes sense to me.

This is a central argument I have noticed Christians will resort to also, when defending their beliefs. When explaining how they know their church is true, they often describe it as having felt "God's" presence, or say that they have communicated with him in prayer. To which I ask God verbally communicated with you? Usually people will respond by saying that they felt him and soon got a bit of good luck that consisted with whatever they were looking for in their prayer, and use that as evidence that they felt God.

Here's the problem... throughout the sixteen years I was religous, I never "felt" the spirit. I said I did all the time. Why? Because I couldn't possibly be the only person who didn't feel it right? I was taught that by praying and doing the things my religion told me to do, I was being good. I thought perhaps the feelings I had of satisfaction in doing things people told me would make God happy, was the spirit. If I cried at any motivational speech in church or felt any sort of emotion, myself and others would always instantly describe it as "feeling the spirit" or the spirit is in the room with us.

As I am older now, I think that it is kind of silly that I had previously attached instinctual human emotions and instincts felt daily by Christians and atheists all over the world, to that of something supernatural.

Are there any religious individuals who claim to have felt the spirit, felt God or some other entities presence, etc?

If so can you explain the "feeling" or experience, and why it makes you sure that your religion is true without a doubt?

This thread is intended for discussion, understanding, and potentially respectable debate. I promise to be open-minded however, as I am generally curious to find what people are feeling, and to see if it differed at all from what I would claim when religious.

Those who claim such things are practicing a sham of a religion - actually just a pietistic, experimental religion with no solid backing.
Madcornishbiker: "No, I don't need a dictionary, I know how scripture uses words and that is all I need to now."