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Ignorance of religion and suicide.

Skepticalone
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9/6/2014 12:51:43 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Frisco police confirmed Thursday that the two dead bodies that were found Wednesday afternoon at a Frisco home belong to the parents of a 10-year-old boy who was found dead in January in the same home.

Pallavi is accused of killing the couple's 10-year-old son, Arnav, but she and her husband had long maintained that Pallavi was innocent and that the boy had pre-existing medical conditions.

Arnav's body was found in a bathtub in the family's home, and Frisco police claimed at that time that Dhawan nodded her head when officers asked if she killed him.

Finn said police do not have an recording of the conversation with Pallavi Dhawan, even though police officers were wearing a body camera with audio capability. He said that the detective told him that the body camera was inactive.

An autopsy on Arnav's death was inconclusive. The medical examiner ruled Arnav died of undetermined causes, saying he likely had a seizure that led to a ruptured cyst in his brain and heart attack.

The medical examiner eventually ruled that the cause of the boy's death could not be determined, but said he most likely died due to "natural disease." Nevertheless, police charged his mother, Pallavi Dhawan, with murder. She was free on $50,000 bond pending a Collin County grand jury's findings.

But Finn added that Pallavi had been under enormous stress during the entire legal process, and sources told FOX 4 that Sumeet told Frisco police that his wife had been depressed and even suicidal.

In the past two weeks, Sumeet and his brother were subpoenaed by a Collin County grand jury, and the criminal case against Pallavi was moving forward.

The Dhawans also had repeatedly sought the return of property, including the family's only car and other personal belongings.

In April, a Collin County district judge ordered that police return personal belongings of no evidentiary value to the couple.

The judge did not initially return the family's vehicle.

In May, the judge ordered police to return the Lexus.

The Dhawans' Hindu religion, like most, generally discourages suicide. However, Hunt says there are conditions in which suicide is considered the right thing to do.

"Generally speaking, the cause of it, or the ostensible cause of it, is, and what makes it right, I should say, is that it calls attention to a grave injustice," said Hunter. "It becomes the only way that a completely powerless person can say, "This is unjust.'"


http://www.myfoxdfw.com...

http://www.usatoday.com...
This thread is like eavesdropping on a conversation in a mental asylum. - Bulproof

You can call your invisible friends whatever you like. - Desmac

What the hell kind of coked up sideshow has this thread turned into. - Casten
Skepticalone
Posts: 6,132
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9/6/2014 2:24:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/6/2014 1:05:01 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
So it's valid to use anectodal evidence as an accurate generalization of a group?

Unless you mean the "group" that is not Hindu, I'm not sure what group you are talking about.
This thread is like eavesdropping on a conversation in a mental asylum. - Bulproof

You can call your invisible friends whatever you like. - Desmac

What the hell kind of coked up sideshow has this thread turned into. - Casten
Benshapiro
Posts: 3,966
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9/6/2014 3:27:32 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/6/2014 2:24:13 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 1:05:01 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
So it's valid to use anectodal evidence as an accurate generalization of a group?

Unless you mean the "group" that is not Hindu, I'm not sure what group you are talking about.

It applies to religious groups in general considering the topic title.
Skepticalone
Posts: 6,132
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9/6/2014 7:22:05 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/6/2014 3:27:32 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
At 9/6/2014 2:24:13 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 1:05:01 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
So it's valid to use anectodal evidence as an accurate generalization of a group?

Unless you mean the "group" that is not Hindu, I'm not sure what group you are talking about.

It applies to religious groups in general considering the topic title.

Ignorance of specific religions would apply to anyone not of a specific religion (anyone not a Hindu in this case). I had limited character space in the topic.
This thread is like eavesdropping on a conversation in a mental asylum. - Bulproof

You can call your invisible friends whatever you like. - Desmac

What the hell kind of coked up sideshow has this thread turned into. - Casten
ChristianPunk
Posts: 1,710
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9/7/2014 11:07:31 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/6/2014 3:27:32 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
At 9/6/2014 2:24:13 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 1:05:01 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
So it's valid to use anectodal evidence as an accurate generalization of a group?

Unless you mean the "group" that is not Hindu, I'm not sure what group you are talking about.

It applies to religious groups in general considering the topic title.

No. It is talking about people who go through with extremist views where their religion tells them to take their own life away. Like Army of God believes the bible and God commands us to kill abortionists. Like radical Isalmists like ISIS that believe Jihad means a literal war. Religion has the good side, but also has that crazy side.
Benshapiro
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9/7/2014 2:06:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/6/2014 7:22:05 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 3:27:32 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
At 9/6/2014 2:24:13 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 1:05:01 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
So it's valid to use anectodal evidence as an accurate generalization of a group?

Unless you mean the "group" that is not Hindu, I'm not sure what group you are talking about.

It applies to religious groups in general considering the topic title.

Ignorance of specific religions would apply to anyone not of a specific religion (anyone not a Hindu in this case). I had limited character space in the topic.

Right, I was just pointing out it was fallacy using anecdotal evidence as a hasty generalization.
Benshapiro
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9/7/2014 2:07:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/7/2014 11:07:31 AM, ChristianPunk wrote:
At 9/6/2014 3:27:32 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
At 9/6/2014 2:24:13 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 1:05:01 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
So it's valid to use anectodal evidence as an accurate generalization of a group?

Unless you mean the "group" that is not Hindu, I'm not sure what group you are talking about.

It applies to religious groups in general considering the topic title.

No. It is talking about people who go through with extremist views where their religion tells them to take their own life away. Like Army of God believes the bible and God commands us to kill abortionists. Like radical Isalmists like ISIS that believe Jihad means a literal war. Religion has the good side, but also has that crazy side.

He took a specific case and applied it as "ignorance of religion and suicide". It's a hasty generalization logical fallacy.
Skepticalone
Posts: 6,132
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9/7/2014 2:40:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/7/2014 2:06:09 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
At 9/6/2014 7:22:05 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 3:27:32 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
At 9/6/2014 2:24:13 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 1:05:01 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
So it's valid to use anectodal evidence as an accurate generalization of a group?

Unless you mean the "group" that is not Hindu, I'm not sure what group you are talking about.

It applies to religious groups in general considering the topic title.

Ignorance of specific religions would apply to anyone not of a specific religion (anyone not a Hindu in this case). I had limited character space in the topic.

Right, I was just pointing out it was fallacy using anecdotal evidence as a hasty generalization.

I can see I didn't phrase that very well. I actually wasn't targeting religion. I was referring to ignorance of the Hindu traditions by the authorites in this case.
This thread is like eavesdropping on a conversation in a mental asylum. - Bulproof

You can call your invisible friends whatever you like. - Desmac

What the hell kind of coked up sideshow has this thread turned into. - Casten
ChristianPunk
Posts: 1,710
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9/7/2014 2:41:34 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/7/2014 2:07:07 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
At 9/7/2014 11:07:31 AM, ChristianPunk wrote:
At 9/6/2014 3:27:32 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
At 9/6/2014 2:24:13 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 9/6/2014 1:05:01 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
So it's valid to use anectodal evidence as an accurate generalization of a group?

Unless you mean the "group" that is not Hindu, I'm not sure what group you are talking about.

It applies to religious groups in general considering the topic title.

No. It is talking about people who go through with extremist views where their religion tells them to take their own life away. Like Army of God believes the bible and God commands us to kill abortionists. Like radical Isalmists like ISIS that believe Jihad means a literal war. Religion has the good side, but also has that crazy side.

He took a specific case and applied it as "ignorance of religion and suicide". It's a hasty generalization logical fallacy.

Religion can tell people to do stupid things. Like the examples I mentioned. He's talking about the concept of religion, but not all people in general.
neutral
Posts: 4,478
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9/7/2014 4:00:50 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/6/2014 12:51:43 PM, Skepticalone wrote:
Frisco police confirmed Thursday that the two dead bodies that were found Wednesday afternoon at a Frisco home belong to the parents of a 10-year-old boy who was found dead in January in the same home.

Pallavi is accused of killing the couple's 10-year-old son, Arnav, but she and her husband had long maintained that Pallavi was innocent and that the boy had pre-existing medical conditions.

Arnav's body was found in a bathtub in the family's home, and Frisco police claimed at that time that Dhawan nodded her head when officers asked if she killed him.

Finn said police do not have an recording of the conversation with Pallavi Dhawan, even though police officers were wearing a body camera with audio capability. He said that the detective told him that the body camera was inactive.

An autopsy on Arnav's death was inconclusive. The medical examiner ruled Arnav died of undetermined causes, saying he likely had a seizure that led to a ruptured cyst in his brain and heart attack.

The medical examiner eventually ruled that the cause of the boy's death could not be determined, but said he most likely died due to "natural disease." Nevertheless, police charged his mother, Pallavi Dhawan, with murder. She was free on $50,000 bond pending a Collin County grand jury's findings.

But Finn added that Pallavi had been under enormous stress during the entire legal process, and sources told FOX 4 that Sumeet told Frisco police that his wife had been depressed and even suicidal.

In the past two weeks, Sumeet and his brother were subpoenaed by a Collin County grand jury, and the criminal case against Pallavi was moving forward.

The Dhawans also had repeatedly sought the return of property, including the family's only car and other personal belongings.

In April, a Collin County district judge ordered that police return personal belongings of no evidentiary value to the couple.

The judge did not initially return the family's vehicle.

In May, the judge ordered police to return the Lexus.

The Dhawans' Hindu religion, like most, generally discourages suicide. However, Hunt says there are conditions in which suicide is considered the right thing to do.

"Generally speaking, the cause of it, or the ostensible cause of it, is, and what makes it right, I should say, is that it calls attention to a grave injustice," said Hunter. "It becomes the only way that a completely powerless person can say, "This is unjust.'"






http://www.myfoxdfw.com...

http://www.usatoday.com...

The question is legit.

Apologies the site won't let me cut and paste ...

The answer appears to be that the main answer is that its the same as secular reasons and deeply frowned upon, stress, social disorders, depression, ill treatment, etc.

http://www.hinduwebsite.com...

It also list three supportable, and in the main stream frowned upon, 'tolerated' suicide.

#1 - Self immolation - an 'offering' in protest, which we do see.

#2 - Death by starvation - a Hunger Strike, which we do see.

#3 - Death in a cave by holding ones breadth - I didn;t even know that was possible.

All of these are to be practiced at the very end of a long and flu life, where all the other duties are permitted.

Support to suicide is not something that Hindu's appear to believe in any more than anyone else, and just like every one else, Hindu's can be driven to depression and anguish that will lead to suicide.