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Do Christians Want To Know The Truth?

SweetLiberty
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10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
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SweetLiberty
Posts: 17
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10/2/2014 1:24:03 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
Yes.

Are you speaking for just yourself, or do you have reason to believe that most Christians would readily accept the reality that the god they believe in did not exist if it was true?
Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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10/2/2014 1:38:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes.
Then what is the point of faith?
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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10/2/2014 1:54:48 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 1:38:33 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes.
Then what is the point of faith?

What was the point of that question?
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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10/2/2014 1:55:19 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 1:24:03 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
Yes.

Are you speaking for just yourself, or do you have reason to believe that most Christians would readily accept the reality that the god they believe in did not exist if it was true?

Not accepting the results isn't the same as not wanting to know if God doesn't exist.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
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Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 1:54:48 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:38:33 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes.
Then what is the point of faith?

What was the point of that question?

To show that Christianity is not about truth or the desire for truth. One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. You can either believe in something regardless of the evidence (or lack thereof), or you can seek to know the truth.

You can't do both.
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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10/2/2014 2:07:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 1:55:19 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:24:03 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
Yes.

Are you speaking for just yourself, or do you have reason to believe that most Christians would readily accept the reality that the god they believe in did not exist if it was true?

Not accepting the results isn't the same as not wanting to know if God doesn't exist.

Care to test that?

Let's suppose you want to test for the existence of your car in the driveway. You kick the tires and note that you're foot stops and bounces back just as the toe of your shoe contacts the visual image of the tire. You lift the hood and observe an engine. You can smell the gas and oil. You open the door, sit in the seat, and start the engine. Every scrap of evidence you manage to gather, is consistent with the proposition that what you observing is a car.

But you refuse to accept the results of this investigation.

So are you demonstrating the desire to know if the car exists? Or are you adhering to a pre-conception regardless of the evidence?
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
SweetLiberty
Posts: 17
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10/2/2014 2:41:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:

Not accepting the results isn't the same as not wanting to know if God doesn't exist.

While I agree, your answer does not address my previous question as to whether you are speaking strictly for yourself, or if you have reason to believe most Christians would actually want to know the truth if it ran contrary to their beliefs.
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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10/2/2014 3:00:08 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 2:41:09 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:

Not accepting the results isn't the same as not wanting to know if God doesn't exist.

While I agree, your answer does not address my previous question as to whether you are speaking strictly for yourself, or if you have reason to believe most Christians would actually want to know the truth if it ran contrary to their beliefs.

I would say they that they would want to know.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
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popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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10/2/2014 3:01:21 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:54:48 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:38:33 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes.
Then what is the point of faith?

What was the point of that question?

To show that Christianity is not about truth or the desire for truth. One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. You can either believe in something regardless of the evidence (or lack thereof), or you can seek to know the truth.

You can't do both.

Whatever you think is faith certainly doesn't characterize my faith (nor historic Christian faith) so this registers little to none with me.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
SweetLiberty
Posts: 17
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10/2/2014 3:05:50 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM, Beastt wrote:

One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. [...]

Using the MW definition of faith that says: firm belief in something for which there is no proof - you are absolutely correct. Faith is entirely unreliable and is summarily dismissed by believers of one religion when offered as proof by someone of a conflicting religion. The quest for truth is not advanced by starting with faith.
SweetLiberty
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10/2/2014 3:25:39 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:00:08 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
I would say they that they would want to know.

Interesting. Since you give no reason for believing most Christians would want to know the truth, am I safe in assuming you just take this matter on faith?
popculturepooka
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10/2/2014 3:34:53 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:05:50 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM, Beastt wrote:

One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. [...]

Using the MW definition of faith that says: firm belief in something for which there is no proof - you are absolutely correct. Faith is entirely unreliable and is summarily dismissed by believers of one religion when offered as proof by someone of a conflicting religion. The quest for truth is not advanced by starting with faith.

Sure, if you are itnerested in simplistic characterizations of positions you don't agree with.

Or, you could actually read what people who have faith actually have to say about their own faith so you won't fall prey to simple binary thinking.

http://plato.stanford.edu...

Fun fact: many early scientists were driven to scientific discovery because of their faith.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
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SweetLiberty
Posts: 17
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10/2/2014 3:55:43 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:34:53 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
Or, you could actually read what people who have faith actually have to say about their own faith so you won't fall prey to simple binary thinking.

http://plato.stanford.edu...

Fun fact: many early scientists were driven to scientific discovery because of their faith.

You point to an article with 7 different definitions of faith, yet don't offer your own. Please, enlighten me - what is your definition of faith?

And indeed, many early scientists were religious, no argument. Yet it is curious as science advances, you see fewer and fewer scientists driven to discovery based on their "faith". Appealing to historic scientists with a less advanced model of how the universe works than scientists of today doesn't advance the cause of faith. It's like appealing to Newton's erroneous beliefs in alchemy as causation for the achievements he got right. You would have to prove that, absent faith in a particular god, scientists could never have made a particular discovery for faith to play any significant role in scientific advancement.
Dragonfang
Posts: 1,122
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10/2/2014 4:09:29 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Faith has a wide spectrum of different definitions. However, when Atheists use it they invariably choose the most restrictive definition: "Blind faith". They refuse to acknowledge their use of faith of many probabilistic propositions, like "the sun will rise tomorrow", "my food is not poisoned", to "science will explain everything", and "dinosaurs evolved to birds". Do they have faith regarding the eternal truth value of the laws of logic and math through time and space? Do they have faith that the known laws of physics will remain consistent from this moment to the next?

The whole point is that faith and intuition doesn't work in philosophical materialism as a priori, no matter how paradoxical this is; after all, knowledge and logic are nothing but subjective and personal brain computation in their worldview. They have faith that certain molecular can randomly become replicators, anti-entropic, animated, and sentient. So they believe in certainty based on speculation and hope, and conjecture. If these things are not true, then their entire worldview crumbles.

Anyways, the OP's question is not specific and can be considered meaningless. Christians already believe that they know the truth. Is the alternative truth that "god does not exist" in your scenario demonstrated through a sound argument to be true?
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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10/2/2014 4:42:06 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:55:43 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 3:34:53 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
Or, you could actually read what people who have faith actually have to say about their own faith so you won't fall prey to simple binary thinking.

http://plato.stanford.edu...

Fun fact: many early scientists were driven to scientific discovery because of their faith.

You point to an article with 7 different definitions of faith, yet don't offer your own. Please, enlighten me - what is your definition of faith?


Trust or confidence. Or hope.

I just found it interesting why you chose the definition of faith you did as if that itself characterizes faith, when it's clear it's a multifaceted concept admitting to multiple different conceptions.

And indeed, many early scientists were religious, no argument. Yet it is curious as science advances, you see fewer and fewer scientists driven to discovery based on their "faith".
Appealing to historic scientists with a less advanced model of how the universe works than scientists of today doesn't advance the cause of faith.

What is "advancing the cause of faith"? I was simply offering a counterpoint to your erroneous claims about the quest for truth doesn't start with the faith. The problem is that we have actual examples of scientists who's quest for truth was motivated by their faith.

It's like appealing to Newton's erroneous beliefs in alchemy as causation for the achievements he got right.

no, it's not like that at all.

You would have to prove that, absent faith in a particular god, scientists could never have made a particular discovery for faith to play any significant role in scientific advancement.

No, I wouldn't. Did you forget what you claimed?
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
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popculturepooka
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10/2/2014 4:44:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:25:39 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 3:00:08 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
I would say they that they would want to know.

Interesting. Since you give no reason for believing most Christians would want to know the truth, am I safe in assuming you just take this matter on faith?

Lol, what do you want? A poll?
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
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LifeMeansGodIsGood
Posts: 2,744
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10/2/2014 4:44:48 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Jesus Christ is the Truth. You apparently do not want to know the truth.
SweetLiberty
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10/2/2014 5:29:30 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 4:42:06 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
I just found it interesting why you chose the definition of faith you did as if that itself characterizes faith, when it's clear it's a multifaceted concept admitting to multiple different conceptions.

The definition I chose fit the context which Beastt was arguing. If we take your definitions, you HOPE your religion is the truth, you TRUST your religion is the truth, and you are CONFIDENT your religion is the truth. But all religious believers can point to these same faith claims which gets no one closer to the actual truth. Faith that "Jesus Christ is the truth" as one poster confidently asserts does not advance the quest for actual truth - it's just an unsubstantiated faith-based assertion, the same as "Muhammad is the truth" or "Vishnu is the truth", etc. Therefore, I stand by my claim that the quest for truth is not advanced by starting with faith.
stubs
Posts: 1,887
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10/2/2014 9:45:06 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 4:42:06 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 3:55:43 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 3:34:53 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
Or, you could actually read what people who have faith actually have to say about their own faith so you won't fall prey to simple binary thinking.

http://plato.stanford.edu...

Fun fact: many early scientists were driven to scientific discovery because of their faith.

You point to an article with 7 different definitions of faith, yet don't offer your own. Please, enlighten me - what is your definition of faith?


Trust or confidence. Or hope.

I think this is a good definition and I think you could even combine all three. It seems to be described as a hopeful expectation. Not simply wishing it to be true but a full expectancy. Would you agree?
TN05
Posts: 4,492
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10/2/2014 9:55:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes, for the same reasons.
ChristianPunk
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10/2/2014 9:55:48 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

I hope so. If any evidence came to me that God didn't exist, then I would surely believe it. However, I might not do things like get rid of the bible. I used it as a moral guide line. If anything, I might be a spiritual person and be like Jefferson when it comes to the bible.
Beastt
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10/2/2014 11:29:25 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:01:21 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:54:48 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:38:33 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes.
Then what is the point of faith?

What was the point of that question?

To show that Christianity is not about truth or the desire for truth. One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. You can either believe in something regardless of the evidence (or lack thereof), or you can seek to know the truth.

You can't do both.

Whatever you think is faith certainly doesn't characterize my faith (nor historic Christian faith) so this registers little to none with me.

Well, if one must believe regardless of the evidence (either against your belief, or for a contrary belief), how can you claim to want to know the truth? What if the truth is supported by evidence, and your faith-based beliefs aren't (as is the case)? How can you claim to want to know the truth, while remaining faith-bound to the beliefs you hold?
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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10/2/2014 11:43:08 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:34:53 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 3:05:50 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM, Beastt wrote:

One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. [...]

Using the MW definition of faith that says: firm belief in something for which there is no proof - you are absolutely correct. Faith is entirely unreliable and is summarily dismissed by believers of one religion when offered as proof by someone of a conflicting religion. The quest for truth is not advanced by starting with faith.

Sure, if you are itnerested in simplistic characterizations of positions you don't agree with.
I don't think it would be fair to describe the question of whether or not God exists as "simplistic".

Or, you could actually read what people who have faith actually have to say about their own faith so you won't fall prey to simple binary thinking.
And the more I do this, (going on to 12-years and hundreds of theists), the more I find that faith is belief devoid of supporting objective evidence.

http://plato.stanford.edu...

Fun fact: many early scientists were driven to scientific discovery because of their faith.
And many early scientists were lead to draw false conclusions because of their faith. This is why science doesn't allow faith. Faith leads people to believe what they wish to be true, rather than what is true, independent of their subjective desires.
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
PGA
Posts: 4,049
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10/3/2014 3:01:49 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:54:48 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:38:33 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes.
Then what is the point of faith?

What was the point of that question?

To show that Christianity is not about truth or the desire for truth. One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. You can either believe in something regardless of the evidence (or lack thereof), or you can seek to know the truth.

You can't do both.

Truth in your relative, subjective world - no thanks!

Beastt = Truth

Peter
PGA
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10/3/2014 3:05:13 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:54:48 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:38:33 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 11:23:15 AM, SweetLiberty wrote:
I've discussed religion with many Christians throughout the years, and recently asked a friend the following question: "If it could be proven that the god you believe exists isn't actually real, would you want to know?" She responded honestly that no, she wouldn't.

When the question is turned on me, I respond that yes, if there is a god - or many gods - I want to know. I want to know the truth of the universe as it is, regardless of how I may want it to be.

So my question for others is, would most Christians honestly want to know the truth if the truth happens to be that god does not exist?

Yes.
Then what is the point of faith?

What was the point of that question?

To show that Christianity is not about truth or the desire for truth. One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. You can either believe in something regardless of the evidence (or lack thereof), or you can seek to know the truth.

Is that your belief or do you not believe this? Your presuppositional foundations require just as much faith as any other belief.

You can't do both.

Peter
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10/3/2014 3:08:59 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 2:07:16 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:55:19 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/2/2014 1:24:03 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:03:31 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
Yes.

Are you speaking for just yourself, or do you have reason to believe that most Christians would readily accept the reality that the god they believe in did not exist if it was true?

Not accepting the results isn't the same as not wanting to know if God doesn't exist.

Care to test that?

Let's suppose you want to test for the existence of your car in the driveway. You kick the tires and note that you're foot stops and bounces back just as the toe of your shoe contacts the visual image of the tire. You lift the hood and observe an engine. You can smell the gas and oil. You open the door, sit in the seat, and start the engine. Every scrap of evidence you manage to gather, is consistent with the proposition that what you observing is a car.

How do you observe logic. What does it smell like, taste like, feel like, look like? Without it you would not be able to make any conclusion.

But you refuse to accept the results of this investigation.

So are you demonstrating the desire to know if the car exists? Or are you adhering to a pre-conception regardless of the evidence?

Peter
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10/3/2014 3:32:11 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:05:50 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 2:01:58 PM, Beastt wrote:

One cannot adhere to a belief on faith, and proclaim that they want to know the truth. These things are mutually exclusive. [...]

What do you hold to this belief on? Why does the evidence point to your belief as true?

Using the MW definition of faith that says: firm belief in something for which there is no proof - you are absolutely correct. Faith is entirely unreliable and is summarily dismissed by believers of one religion when offered as proof by someone of a conflicting religion. The quest for truth is not advanced by starting with faith.

Your belief rests on faith just like everyone else. You can't prove that God does not exist. You can only surmise this to be so because you filter everything through your core suppositions.

Your core suppositions go something like this..."Since I can't see God and no one can show me God the evidence points to God's non-existence..."

The question is just what evidence you will believe? The Bible says,

6 And without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is and that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.
Hebrews 11:6

Now you come along and say, "If God doesn't do what I want Him to do then God does not exist." As if you, a mere creature, can dictate to God on what He is going to or should do or on what evidence He needs to give you.

You are not going to believe He exists no matter what evidence He has given. You will no accept it. You have made your mind up and you live by that faith in His non-existence.

Peter
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10/3/2014 3:34:50 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:25:39 PM, SweetLiberty wrote:
At 10/2/2014 3:00:08 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
I would say they that they would want to know.

Interesting. Since you give no reason for believing most Christians would want to know the truth, am I safe in assuming you just take this matter on faith?

You are under the assumption that believing is the biblical God is not true. Why is your belief true? Who makes you the one who determines truth when it comes to God?

Peter