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Is belief a choice?

Jayhawker_Soule
Posts: 169
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12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?
Got_Rebuttal
Posts: 2
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12/1/2014 3:40:59 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Well, yes, belief is a choice. When God created the human being, he knew that we would not all choose to be with him, and that humans make mistakes. That was why he allows us to choose, even though he always hopes we make the right choice. I don't really know what you mean by the second question. Could you explain?
Skyangel
Posts: 8,234
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12/1/2014 3:46:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Yes, you can choose to believe in fairies or you can choose not to believe in fairies.
However if you choose not to believe in fairies you will kill the fairies by your unbelief.
Do you really want to cause harm to those innocent creatures?

<i<x>frame width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Q5ncRVfJ2y8?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Jayhawker_Soule
Posts: 169
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12/1/2014 3:51:04 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 3:40:59 PM, Got_Rebuttal wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Well, yes, belief is a choice. ...

At 12/1/2014 3:46:33 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Yes, you can choose to believe in fairies or you can choose not to believe in fairies. "

I would ask both of you to choose to believe that I am a leprechaun. I suspect that you'll fail. Let us know.
Skyangel
Posts: 8,234
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12/1/2014 3:58:38 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 3:51:04 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:40:59 PM, Got_Rebuttal wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Well, yes, belief is a choice. ...

At 12/1/2014 3:46:33 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Yes, you can choose to believe in fairies or you can choose not to believe in fairies. "

I would ask both of you to choose to believe that I am a leprechaun. I suspect that you'll fail. Let us know.

Do you believe you are a leprechaun?
If you don't believe you are a leprechaun, why would you want anyone else to believe what you don't believe yourself?
Will someones unbelief kill you?
Will you torture them in a lake of fire forever if they don't believe you?
Jayhawker_Soule
Posts: 169
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12/1/2014 4:09:56 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 3:58:38 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:51:04 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:40:59 PM, Got_Rebuttal wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Well, yes, belief is a choice. ...

At 12/1/2014 3:46:33 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Yes, you can choose to believe in fairies or you can choose not to believe in fairies. "

I would ask both of you to choose to believe that I am a leprechaun. I suspect that you'll fail. Let us know.

Do you believe you are a leprechaun?
If you don't believe you are a leprechaun, why would you want anyone else to believe what you don't believe yourself? "

That is entirely irrelevant. You claim that belief is a choice. I, on the other hand, suspect that you are entirely incapable of believing - even for a few minutes - that I am a leprechaun. Your attempt to dance around the question does nothing to challenge this contention. That's OK. Doxastic voluntarism is a difficult topic and one that few have seriously considered.
Skyangel
Posts: 8,234
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12/1/2014 4:33:56 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 4:09:56 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:58:38 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:51:04 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:40:59 PM, Got_Rebuttal wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Well, yes, belief is a choice. ...

At 12/1/2014 3:46:33 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Yes, you can choose to believe in fairies or you can choose not to believe in fairies. "

I would ask both of you to choose to believe that I am a leprechaun. I suspect that you'll fail. Let us know.

Do you believe you are a leprechaun?
If you don't believe you are a leprechaun, why would you want anyone else to believe what you don't believe yourself? "

That is entirely irrelevant. You claim that belief is a choice. I, on the other hand, suspect that you are entirely incapable of believing - even for a few minutes - that I am a leprechaun. Your attempt to dance around the question does nothing to challenge this contention. That's OK. Doxastic voluntarism is a difficult topic and one that few have seriously considered.

Nope, I am not incapable of believing you are a leprechaun. I can manage that for a few minutes. I have no reason to believe you are not a leprechaun, so I will believe you are one till someones gives me a good reason to believe you are not.

Leprechauns are old men who wear green suits . They enjoy mischief making and playing tricks on people. They hide their gold so others can't find it.
I have seen plenty of those people in the planet. You might very well be one of them. I have no reason to believe you are not.

There you go. That will give people a few minutes to convince me you are not an old man who wears a green suit , hides his gold from others and mischievously plays tricks on people.
Jayhawker_Soule
Posts: 169
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12/1/2014 4:37:46 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 4:33:56 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 4:09:56 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:58:38 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:51:04 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:40:59 PM, Got_Rebuttal wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Well, yes, belief is a choice. ...

At 12/1/2014 3:46:33 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Yes, you can choose to believe in fairies or you can choose not to believe in fairies. "

I would ask both of you to choose to believe that I am a leprechaun. I suspect that you'll fail. Let us know.

Do you believe you are a leprechaun?
If you don't believe you are a leprechaun, why would you want anyone else to believe what you don't believe yourself? "

That is entirely irrelevant. You claim that belief is a choice. I, on the other hand, suspect that you are entirely incapable of believing - even for a few minutes - that I am a leprechaun. Your attempt to dance around the question does nothing to challenge this contention. That's OK. Doxastic voluntarism is a difficult topic and one that few have seriously considered.

Nope, I am not incapable of believing you are a leprechaun. I can manage that for a few minutes.

So you continue to dance. Obviously (except, perhaps, to you) believing something and imagining it are not at all the same. Have a good evening.
Skyangel
Posts: 8,234
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12/1/2014 4:56:35 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 4:37:46 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 4:33:56 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 4:09:56 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:58:38 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:51:04 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:40:59 PM, Got_Rebuttal wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Well, yes, belief is a choice. ...

At 12/1/2014 3:46:33 PM, Skyangel wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Yes, you can choose to believe in fairies or you can choose not to believe in fairies. "

I would ask both of you to choose to believe that I am a leprechaun. I suspect that you'll fail. Let us know.

Do you believe you are a leprechaun?
If you don't believe you are a leprechaun, why would you want anyone else to believe what you don't believe yourself? "

That is entirely irrelevant. You claim that belief is a choice. I, on the other hand, suspect that you are entirely incapable of believing - even for a few minutes - that I am a leprechaun. Your attempt to dance around the question does nothing to challenge this contention. That's OK. Doxastic voluntarism is a difficult topic and one that few have seriously considered.

Nope, I am not incapable of believing you are a leprechaun. I can manage that for a few minutes.

So you continue to dance. Obviously (except, perhaps, to you) believing something and imagining it are not at all the same. Have a good evening.

Well I need to imagine you are a leprechaun if I want to believe you are one. I obviously can't see you in reality so for all I know you might be one. Prove to me you are not.
Convince me you are not because I am choosing to believe you are a leprechaun to show you it is not impossible to choose to believe something.

I merely called your bluff. Now its up to you to prove you are not a leprechaun and give me a good reason to change my belief . Can you do that without dancing ?
birdlandmemories
Posts: 4,140
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12/1/2014 5:06:32 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

Yeah, it's not "God's calling" like some people try to declare.
Ashton
dee-em
Posts: 6,446
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12/1/2014 9:03:46 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

No, of course not. Beliefs are formed, never chosen.

For a Christian, I would ask them to choose to believe that Jesus is false and that Allah is the one true god. They have to sincerely believe this with all their heart for a few minutes. Of course they won't be able to do it because that is not how belief works.
Skepticalone
Posts: 6,093
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12/1/2014 11:05:22 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

No, belief is not a choice. I suppose informed belief would be something along the lines of revelation, if anything at all.
This thread is like eavesdropping on a conversation in a mental asylum. - Bulproof

You can call your invisible friends whatever you like. - Desmac

What the hell kind of coked up sideshow has this thread turned into. - Casten
DanneJeRusse
Posts: 12,580
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12/6/2014 9:53:05 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

A choice? Perhaps, but I would suspect it more of a resulting state of mind. I suppose I would need to ask, what kind of choice? Logical? Emotional? Metaphysical?

If logical, then it wouldn't be a choice a logical person would make as it could be shown to be illogical, like believing or not believing in leprechauns.

If emotional, one would need to explain why they would emotionally would choose to believe in leprechauns. Perhaps, they are obsessed with garden gnomes. Who knows.

Metaphysically, one can choose to believe that black is white, and that magic reigns supreme throughout the universe, with invisible agents darting about in a constant war of good vs. evil, all of which are crafted to influence our choice to believe.

Informed belief? Isn't that just another way saying "understanding"?
Marrying a 6 year old and waiting until she reaches puberty and maturity before having consensual sex is better than walking up to
a stranger in a bar and proceeding to have relations with no valid proof of the intent of the person. Muhammad wins. ~ Fatihah
If they don't want to be killed then they have to subdue to the Islamic laws. - Uncung
Without God, you are lower than sh!t. ~ SpiritandTruth
LifeMeansGodIsGood
Posts: 2,744
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12/6/2014 10:39:56 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

You have been told that you die for your sins. If you don't believe it, you can't say you were not imformed. "The soul that sins shall surely die". Believe it or not.

Boggles my mind how people can ask questions like yours as if it is an intelligent question. You are only trying to make an excuse for ignoring the information God presents to you. God does not buy excuses, and you can't buy your way out of Hell (That is what religion does...all religion inclduing Catholicism, Hinduism, Existentialiism which is atheistic, all of them make the practitioner think they are buying their way out of Hell) God loves you and gave Himself to pay for your sins, as the Son of God sent by God the Father who gave his only begotten Son so that in Him, in His resurrection, by Him, you can be saved from Hell. It's so simple a child can understand, but people tend to complicate things thinking they can justify themselves and call death some kind of gift of nature or some other weird imagination in which they hope to escape God's judgement agaist their guilt.

You cannot be saved from Hell if you will not acknowledge Jesus as God, believe on His resurrection, admit your guilt as a sinner agaisnt God, and receieve Jesus Christ personally as your Saviour. God will not give you pardon from Hell on your own terms. He makes the rules, and His rule is love for you and justice against your sin. If you will not accept His offer of pardon based on the blood of His Son which paid for your sin, you will only know Him by His justice in which you will be confined and consumed in the fire of Hell, never again able to believe God loves you.

You can believe God loves you now. If you will not believe God loves you, your death will be finalized and you will be lost in Hell forever by your own choice.

Of course it is a choice to believe or to not believe, but your unbelief will not make God go away and it will not make Hell unreal.
POPOO5560
Posts: 2,482
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12/6/2014 10:44:52 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/6/2014 10:39:56 AM, LifeMeansGodIsGood wrote:
At 12/1/2014 3:09:06 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:
Is belief a choice? And (what I believe to be a related question) what constitutes informed belief when it comes to religion?

You have been told that you die for your sins. If you don't believe it, you can't say you were not imformed. "The soul that sins shall surely die". Believe it or not.

Boggles my mind how people can ask questions like yours as if it is an intelligent question. You are only trying to make an excuse for ignoring the information God presents to you. God does not buy excuses, and you can't buy your way out of Hell (That is what religion does...all religion inclduing Catholicism, Hinduism, Existentialiism which is atheistic, all of them make the practitioner think they are buying their way out of Hell) God loves you and gave Himself to pay for your sins, as the Son of God sent by God the Father who gave his only begotten Son so that in Him, in His resurrection, by Him, you can be saved from Hell. It's so simple a child can understand, but people tend to complicate things thinking they can justify themselves and call death some kind of gift of nature or some other weird imagination in which they hope to escape God's judgement agaist their guilt.

You cannot be saved from Hell if you will not acknowledge Jesus as God, believe on His resurrection, admit your guilt as a sinner agaisnt God, and receieve Jesus Christ personally as your Saviour. God will not give you pardon from Hell on your own terms. He makes the rules, and His rule is love for you and justice against your sin. If you will not accept His offer of pardon based on the blood of His Son which paid for your sin, you will only know Him by His justice in which you will be confined and consumed in the fire of Hell, never again able to believe God loves you.

You can believe God loves you now. If you will not believe God loves you, your death will be finalized and you will be lost in Hell forever by your own choice.

Of course it is a choice to believe or to not believe, but your unbelief will not make God go away and it will not make Hell unreal.

https://www.youtube.com... neeeeeeeeeeerdddddd!!
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Double_R
Posts: 4,886
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12/6/2014 10:54:26 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I used to flat out say no to this question, but I have since added to my perspective.

To the rational mind that is aware of its own mental processes, no, belief is not a choice

To the emotional mind that is not aware of its own mental processes, yes, belief is a choice.

People who are emotionally minded follow their intuition (derived from their instant emotional reactions) to make decisions and form beliefs. To be rational is suspend your emotions so you can to take apart that intuition and analyze it by using logic and reason to determine which aspects are valid (and hold onto them) and which aspects are invalid (and get rid of them).

The most common invalid aspect is our own desires. Logic and reason easily allow us to conclude that our desire for something to be true does not make it true and thus should have no impact on what we believe to be true. However, if you are not rational but rather emotional then you never take this step to filter out your own desires when it comes to what you believe to be true. Your unawareness of the process occurring internally as you determine what to believe allow you to believe whatever you want, causing you to think of belief and desire as being tied together in one big gray area as opposed to the black and white area that it really is.

I think this is why so many theists tend to say such stupid things like "you hate God" or "you're only an atheist because you want to sin". These people think that our beliefs are the result of emotion because they don't know any better. They simply don't understand the concept of separating emotions from beliefs because they don't do so within themselves.
Double_R
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12/6/2014 10:56:31 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
lol case and point...

At 12/6/2014 10:39:56 AM, LifeMeansGodIsGood wrote:
Boggles my mind how people can ask questions like yours as if it is an intelligent question. You are only trying to make an excuse for ignoring the information God presents to you.
Skepticalone
Posts: 6,093
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12/6/2014 11:19:44 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/6/2014 10:54:26 AM, Double_R wrote:
I used to flat out say no to this question, but I have since added to my perspective.

To the rational mind that is aware of its own mental processes, no, belief is not a choice

To the emotional mind that is not aware of its own mental processes, yes, belief is a choice.

People who are emotionally minded follow their intuition (derived from their instant emotional reactions) to make decisions and form beliefs. To be rational is suspend your emotions so you can to take apart that intuition and analyze it by using logic and reason to determine which aspects are valid (and hold onto them) and which aspects are invalid (and get rid of them).

The most common invalid aspect is our own desires. Logic and reason easily allow us to conclude that our desire for something to be true does not make it true and thus should have no impact on what we believe to be true. However, if you are not rational but rather emotional then you never take this step to filter out your own desires when it comes to what you believe to be true. Your unawareness of the process occurring internally as you determine what to believe allow you to believe whatever you want, causing you to think of belief and desire as being tied together in one big gray area as opposed to the black and white area that it really is.

I think this is why so many theists tend to say such stupid things like "you hate God" or "you're only an atheist because you want to sin". These people think that our beliefs are the result of emotion because they don't know any better. They simply don't understand the concept of separating emotions from beliefs because they don't do so within themselves.

That is a very insightful answer. The answer to this question may reflect which process is predominantly preferred by an individual, or is that going too far?
This thread is like eavesdropping on a conversation in a mental asylum. - Bulproof

You can call your invisible friends whatever you like. - Desmac

What the hell kind of coked up sideshow has this thread turned into. - Casten
Double_R
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12/6/2014 12:03:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/6/2014 11:19:44 AM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 12/6/2014 10:54:26 AM, Double_R wrote:
I used to flat out say no to this question, but I have since added to my perspective.

To the rational mind that is aware of its own mental processes, no, belief is not a choice

To the emotional mind that is not aware of its own mental processes, yes, belief is a choice.

People who are emotionally minded follow their intuition (derived from their instant emotional reactions) to make decisions and form beliefs. To be rational is suspend your emotions so you can to take apart that intuition and analyze it by using logic and reason to determine which aspects are valid (and hold onto them) and which aspects are invalid (and get rid of them).

The most common invalid aspect is our own desires. Logic and reason easily allow us to conclude that our desire for something to be true does not make it true and thus should have no impact on what we believe to be true. However, if you are not rational but rather emotional then you never take this step to filter out your own desires when it comes to what you believe to be true. Your unawareness of the process occurring internally as you determine what to believe allow you to believe whatever you want, causing you to think of belief and desire as being tied together in one big gray area as opposed to the black and white area that it really is.

I think this is why so many theists tend to say such stupid things like "you hate God" or "you're only an atheist because you want to sin". These people think that our beliefs are the result of emotion because they don't know any better. They simply don't understand the concept of separating emotions from beliefs because they don't do so within themselves.

That is a very insightful answer. The answer to this question may reflect which process is predominantly preferred by an individual, or is that going too far?

No, I think that is exactly what it is. See here's the thing, the process it is kind of like a Where's Waldo picture... You an look at it for hours and never see him, but once you do see him it's impossible to look at the picture and not see him. In other words you can't become aware of the false role that your desires play in shaping your beliefs and then not see them at work, which combined with the self evident realization that your desires do not dictate reality, forces you to discard them from the process. Any attempt to include them in the process anyway will leave you with the knowledge that you used a false process, so it would be a futile attempt. This is why rationally minded individuals are incapable of believing what they want, because they can no longer pretend that they don't see what's really happening.

So when I hear these moronic arguments (like the one I quoted above) then it becomes evidently clear that this person either fits the emotional category, or is as intellectually dishonest as they come. You can go from being emotion to rational, but you can't go from being rational to emotional.
Skepticalone
Posts: 6,093
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12/6/2014 1:29:18 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/6/2014 12:03:12 PM, Double_R wrote:
At 12/6/2014 11:19:44 AM, Skepticalone wrote:
At 12/6/2014 10:54:26 AM, Double_R wrote:
I used to flat out say no to this question, but I have since added to my perspective.

To the rational mind that is aware of its own mental processes, no, belief is not a choice

To the emotional mind that is not aware of its own mental processes, yes, belief is a choice.

People who are emotionally minded follow their intuition (derived from their instant emotional reactions) to make decisions and form beliefs. To be rational is suspend your emotions so you can to take apart that intuition and analyze it by using logic and reason to determine which aspects are valid (and hold onto them) and which aspects are invalid (and get rid of them).

The most common invalid aspect is our own desires. Logic and reason easily allow us to conclude that our desire for something to be true does not make it true and thus should have no impact on what we believe to be true. However, if you are not rational but rather emotional then you never take this step to filter out your own desires when it comes to what you believe to be true. Your unawareness of the process occurring internally as you determine what to believe allow you to believe whatever you want, causing you to think of belief and desire as being tied together in one big gray area as opposed to the black and white area that it really is.

I think this is why so many theists tend to say such stupid things like "you hate God" or "you're only an atheist because you want to sin". These people think that our beliefs are the result of emotion because they don't know any better. They simply don't understand the concept of separating emotions from beliefs because they don't do so within themselves.

That is a very insightful answer. The answer to this question may reflect which process is predominantly preferred by an individual, or is that going too far?

No, I think that is exactly what it is. See here's the thing, the process it is kind of like a Where's Waldo picture... You an look at it for hours and never see him, but once you do see him it's impossible to look at the picture and not see him. In other words you can't become aware of the false role that your desires play in shaping your beliefs and then not see them at work, which combined with the self evident realization that your desires do not dictate reality, forces you to discard them from the process. Any attempt to include them in the process anyway will leave you with the knowledge that you used a false process, so it would be a futile attempt. This is why rationally minded individuals are incapable of believing what they want, because they can no longer pretend that they don't see what's really happening.

So when I hear these moronic arguments (like the one I quoted above) then it becomes evidently clear that this person either fits the emotional category, or is as intellectually dishonest as they come. You can go from being emotion to rational, but you can't go from being rational to emotional.

+1
This thread is like eavesdropping on a conversation in a mental asylum. - Bulproof

You can call your invisible friends whatever you like. - Desmac

What the hell kind of coked up sideshow has this thread turned into. - Casten
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
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12/6/2014 1:42:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/1/2014 3:51:04 PM, Jayhawker_Soule wrote:

I would ask both of you to choose to believe that I am a leprechaun. I suspect that you'll fail. Let us know.

People typically base their beliefs on reality based on available knowledge to them. With that knowledge, people can reach their own conclusions.

In this case, there's no evidence to suggest you're a leprechaun, so people won't believe that you are one.

This doesn't mean that belief is not a choice, however. For example, choosing to run all the way to someone's house is a choice, but I'm not going to do it when I can just drive there. Does this mean running is not a choice made by us? No, that's ridiculous. The same applies to this situation.