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Religion and Schizophrenia

Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
jodybirdy
Posts: 2,089
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12/15/2014 8:28:17 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM, Beastt wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?

I think that religion gives the person with the existing problem something to focus on and that it might not always be healthy depending on the type of illness they have.
A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral."
Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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12/15/2014 8:34:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 8:28:17 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM, Beastt wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?

I think that religion gives the person with the existing problem something to focus on and that it might not always be healthy depending on the type of illness they have.

Since (in the study), 76% of the patients weren't suffering religious delusions, the patient can find an outlet for the disorder whether they're religious or not. I would suggest that religion - due to it's disconnect with reality - serves as a catalyst for tendencies toward schizophrenia.
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
jodybirdy
Posts: 2,089
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12/15/2014 8:45:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 8:34:52 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:28:17 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM, Beastt wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?

I think that religion gives the person with the existing problem something to focus on and that it might not always be healthy depending on the type of illness they have.

Since (in the study), 76% of the patients weren't suffering religious delusions, the patient can find an outlet for the disorder whether they're religious or not. I would suggest that religion - due to it's disconnect with reality - serves as a catalyst for tendencies toward schizophrenia.

Yes, because they've found something where people will believe what they say. If you tell your pastor that Jesus talks to you he can't exactly say that's impossible and to get help.
A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral."
Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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12/15/2014 8:53:22 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 8:45:21 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:34:52 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:28:17 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM, Beastt wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?

I think that religion gives the person with the existing problem something to focus on and that it might not always be healthy depending on the type of illness they have.

Since (in the study), 76% of the patients weren't suffering religious delusions, the patient can find an outlet for the disorder whether they're religious or not. I would suggest that religion - due to it's disconnect with reality - serves as a catalyst for tendencies toward schizophrenia.

Yes, because they've found something where people will believe what they say. If you tell your pastor that Jesus talks to you he can't exactly say that's impossible and to get help.

That's true. Religion would be the point of interest most likely to help feed one's delusions and channel them into serious mental illness. Many Christians speak to Jesus. Many claim Jesus answers. But if you find one who has conversations with Jesus, most Christians will believe they're a lunatic.
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
jodybirdy
Posts: 2,089
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12/15/2014 9:00:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 8:53:22 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:45:21 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:34:52 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:28:17 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM, Beastt wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?

I think that religion gives the person with the existing problem something to focus on and that it might not always be healthy depending on the type of illness they have.

Since (in the study), 76% of the patients weren't suffering religious delusions, the patient can find an outlet for the disorder whether they're religious or not. I would suggest that religion - due to it's disconnect with reality - serves as a catalyst for tendencies toward schizophrenia.

Yes, because they've found something where people will believe what they say. If you tell your pastor that Jesus talks to you he can't exactly say that's impossible and to get help.

That's true. Religion would be the point of interest most likely to help feed one's delusions and channel them into serious mental illness. Many Christians speak to Jesus. Many claim Jesus answers. But if you find one who has conversations with Jesus, most Christians will believe they're a lunatic.

Examples of that exist here even. If they don't use religion catalyst they'll find something else. I think it's safe to say that it's just a tool in many cases.

There are some situations where religion might be the cause. But for the most part I think mentally ill people gravitate to religion for many different reasons.
A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral."
Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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12/15/2014 9:08:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 9:00:27 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:53:22 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:45:21 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:34:52 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:28:17 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM, Beastt wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?

I think that religion gives the person with the existing problem something to focus on and that it might not always be healthy depending on the type of illness they have.

Since (in the study), 76% of the patients weren't suffering religious delusions, the patient can find an outlet for the disorder whether they're religious or not. I would suggest that religion - due to it's disconnect with reality - serves as a catalyst for tendencies toward schizophrenia.

Yes, because they've found something where people will believe what they say. If you tell your pastor that Jesus talks to you he can't exactly say that's impossible and to get help.

That's true. Religion would be the point of interest most likely to help feed one's delusions and channel them into serious mental illness. Many Christians speak to Jesus. Many claim Jesus answers. But if you find one who has conversations with Jesus, most Christians will believe they're a lunatic.

Examples of that exist here even. If they don't use religion catalyst they'll find something else. I think it's safe to say that it's just a tool in many cases.

There are some situations where religion might be the cause. But for the most part I think mentally ill people gravitate to religion for many different reasons.

I suspect that it attracts those on the verge of slipping from the precipice of reality, as well as helping to shove a few over. In nearly every other situation, one can expect their early delusions to be rejected and ridiculed. Religion is one of very few examples where open declarations of delusion are rewarded and claimed to be a virtue.
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire
jodybirdy
Posts: 2,089
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12/15/2014 9:12:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 9:08:58 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 9:00:27 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:53:22 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:45:21 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:34:52 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:28:17 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM, Beastt wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?

I think that religion gives the person with the existing problem something to focus on and that it might not always be healthy depending on the type of illness they have.

Since (in the study), 76% of the patients weren't suffering religious delusions, the patient can find an outlet for the disorder whether they're religious or not. I would suggest that religion - due to it's disconnect with reality - serves as a catalyst for tendencies toward schizophrenia.

Yes, because they've found something where people will believe what they say. If you tell your pastor that Jesus talks to you he can't exactly say that's impossible and to get help.

That's true. Religion would be the point of interest most likely to help feed one's delusions and channel them into serious mental illness. Many Christians speak to Jesus. Many claim Jesus answers. But if you find one who has conversations with Jesus, most Christians will believe they're a lunatic.

Examples of that exist here even. If they don't use religion catalyst they'll find something else. I think it's safe to say that it's just a tool in many cases.

There are some situations where religion might be the cause. But for the most part I think mentally ill people gravitate to religion for many different reasons.

I suspect that it attracts those on the verge of slipping from the precipice of reality, as well as helping to shove a few over. In nearly every other situation, one can expect their early delusions to be rejected and ridiculed. Religion is one of very few examples where open declarations of delusion are rewarded and claimed to be a virtue.

I could see that. But not all people who are religious are suffering from delusions. I think it also attracts artistic thinkers. Right brained people who can see beauty in the abstract.
A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral."
Beastt
Posts: 5,135
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12/15/2014 9:23:48 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 9:12:50 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 9:08:58 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 9:00:27 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:53:22 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:45:21 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:34:52 PM, Beastt wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:28:17 PM, jodybirdy wrote:
At 12/15/2014 8:07:05 PM, Beastt wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

The relationship between religion and schizophrenia is of particular interest to psychologists because of the similarities between religious experiences and psychotic episodes; religious experiences often involve auditory and/or visual hallucinations, and those with schizophrenia commonly report similar hallucinations, along with a variety of delusions and faulty beliefs. A common report from those with schizophrenia is some type of a religious delusion - that is, they believe they are divine beings, God is talking to them, they are possessed by demons, etc. In a study of patients with schizophrenia that had been previously admitted to a hospital, 24% had religious delusions. This has led some researchers to question whether schizophrenia leads an individual to become more religious, or if intense religiosity leads to schizophrenia.

One need spend very little time here to see this in action.

My question would be'; once one has divorced themselves from reality to a degree that they can believe ancient stories without the benefit of evidence, how far can they be from sinking more deeply into more serious levels of fantasy?

It seems obvious that religion can - and does - lead to mental illness. Think about a few of the members here. Who can't come up with at least three examples among the resident theists?

I think that religion gives the person with the existing problem something to focus on and that it might not always be healthy depending on the type of illness they have.

Since (in the study), 76% of the patients weren't suffering religious delusions, the patient can find an outlet for the disorder whether they're religious or not. I would suggest that religion - due to it's disconnect with reality - serves as a catalyst for tendencies toward schizophrenia.

Yes, because they've found something where people will believe what they say. If you tell your pastor that Jesus talks to you he can't exactly say that's impossible and to get help.

That's true. Religion would be the point of interest most likely to help feed one's delusions and channel them into serious mental illness. Many Christians speak to Jesus. Many claim Jesus answers. But if you find one who has conversations with Jesus, most Christians will believe they're a lunatic.

Examples of that exist here even. If they don't use religion catalyst they'll find something else. I think it's safe to say that it's just a tool in many cases.

There are some situations where religion might be the cause. But for the most part I think mentally ill people gravitate to religion for many different reasons.

I suspect that it attracts those on the verge of slipping from the precipice of reality, as well as helping to shove a few over. In nearly every other situation, one can expect their early delusions to be rejected and ridiculed. Religion is one of very few examples where open declarations of delusion are rewarded and claimed to be a virtue.

I could see that. But not all people who are religious are suffering from delusions. I think it also attracts artistic thinkers. Right brained people who can see beauty in the abstract.

I would suggest that religion attracts those most prone to seeking emotional pacification - even above rationality. After all, religion is all about providing emotional pacification. It becomes difficult to suggest that anyone who is religious (belief in the supernatural, God or gods, the afterlife, etc.), is other than delusional. Trying to classify religion separately from any other purely unevidenced belief is - in my opinion - intellectually dishonest. It's not less delusional simply because one labels it "religion".
"If we believe absurdities we shall commit atrocities." -- Voltaire