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Religion Without God

Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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12/26/2014 10:16:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
"Much of what people actually do in church " finding fellowship, celebrating birth and marriage, remembering those we have lost, affirming the values we cherish " can be accomplished with a sense of God as metaphor, as story, or even without any mention of God at all."

http://www.nytimes.com...

Thoughts?
President of DDO
ChristianPunk
Posts: 1,710
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12/26/2014 10:33:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/26/2014 10:16:05 PM, Danielle wrote:
"Much of what people actually do in church " finding fellowship, celebrating birth and marriage, remembering those we have lost, affirming the values we cherish " can be accomplished with a sense of God as metaphor, as story, or even without any mention of God at all."

http://www.nytimes.com...

Thoughts?

Of course it's possible. I know a certain minority of people who believe that God is a metaphor for certain things. One of my friends claimed to be a Christian Wiccan and claimed to believe in the Wisdom version of God where He was a She. But I doubt she literally believed that, she just didn't like the bible having lower views of women and she was too much of a feminist.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,280
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12/26/2014 10:34:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/26/2014 10:16:05 PM, Danielle wrote:
"Much of what people actually do in church " finding fellowship, celebrating birth and marriage, remembering those we have lost, affirming the values we cherish " can be accomplished with a sense of God as metaphor, as story, or even without any mention of God at all."

http://www.nytimes.com...

Thoughts?

I have a feeling that most of the people who will be drawn to this are the previously religious, who miss some aspect of the church community, or people who are just very social. I've had conversations with my siblings about this (we're all atheists) and none of them expressed any interest in it. We were raised without religion, as atheism goes back three generations on one side of the family, and were all always disconcerted on some level when we went to church for functions. It just felt bizarre to me, all of these people reciting something together, or being instructed without really studying the material at all. I don't think that switching up the ideology would make that environment any more appealing to one who hasn't been acclimated to it since childhood. I might be inclined to think that my detached nature and introversion may have something to do with it, but two of my siblings are quite extroverted, and the idea creeps them out as well.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -