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Unicorns Exists

Mhykiel
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1/1/2015 8:57:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
First I want to address the biblical unicorn. The Hebrew word often translated Unicorn is "Reym". Some modern translations, in what I feel is secular pressure to remove mythical looking creatures have translated the word lately as "wild ox".

Job 39:9 "Will the [Reym] be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?"
10 "Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?"

Psalm 29:6 "Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the [horns of the Reym]

Psalm 92:10 "But my horn shalt thou exalt like the [horn of Reym]: I shall be anointed with fresh oil."

When the Hebrew was translated into The Septuagint the word used was "monokeros" which means one horn. When this greek was translated into Latin the word used was unicornus. And from there we get the old English in the King James version "Unicorn".

It is at times hard to tell if the Reym has one Horn or Two. It is described with a notable horn and great strength. And Job asks if lowly man can yoke this creature to plow valleys. Plowing animal was the bull.

Adding these descriptions together one animal matches. A rhinoceros. Asian rhino's have one horn African rhinos have two horns, and the beast has a beast of burden type look similar to a bull. Not to mention that the Rhino's scientific Latin name is unicornus.

I think Reym is definitely a Rhinoceros.

Now what is interesting is the most detailed description of anything resembling a Unicorn is in Daniel.

Daniel 8:5 "And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground: and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes."

But the word here used was not Reym. It was the word for goat. Medieval art often depicts unicorns as small, with cloven hooves and beards, sometimes resembling goats more than horses with horns.

And some goat horns have been artificially grafted together in growing kids to produce single horns. Such animals have been seen in circuses.

Many animals with horns will sometimes have single horns, a result from trauma or genetic mutation.

Goats were well known, and are not known for their wildness or great strength. So I do not think goats are an accurate description for "Reym" but I do think are an accurate explanation for medieval accounts and the root to the more modern representation of a stallion with one horn.

http://io9.com...

Ultimately Unicorns are not as mythical as some people believe. They are real and easily explained by facts.
Vox_Veritas
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1/1/2015 9:14:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Goats are awesome. Just felt the need to insert that.
Call me Vox, the Resident Contrarian of debate.org.

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Kyle_the_Heretic
Posts: 748
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1/1/2015 9:40:11 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 8:57:58 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
First I want to address the biblical unicorn. The Hebrew word often translated Unicorn is "Reym". Some modern translations, in what I feel is secular pressure to remove mythical looking creatures have translated the word lately as "wild ox".

Job 39:9 "Will the [Reym] be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?"
10 "Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?"

Psalm 29:6 "Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the [horns of the Reym]

Psalm 92:10 "But my horn shalt thou exalt like the [horn of Reym]: I shall be anointed with fresh oil."

When the Hebrew was translated into The Septuagint the word used was "monokeros" which means one horn. When this greek was translated into Latin the word used was unicornus. And from there we get the old English in the King James version "Unicorn".

It is at times hard to tell if the Reym has one Horn or Two. It is described with a notable horn and great strength. And Job asks if lowly man can yoke this creature to plow valleys. Plowing animal was the bull.

Adding these descriptions together one animal matches. A rhinoceros. Asian rhino's have one horn African rhinos have two horns, and the beast has a beast of burden type look similar to a bull. Not to mention that the Rhino's scientific Latin name is unicornus.

I think Reym is definitely a Rhinoceros.

Now what is interesting is the most detailed description of anything resembling a Unicorn is in Daniel.

Daniel 8:5 "And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground: and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes."

But the word here used was not Reym. It was the word for goat. Medieval art often depicts unicorns as small, with cloven hooves and beards, sometimes resembling goats more than horses with horns.

And some goat horns have been artificially grafted together in growing kids to produce single horns. Such animals have been seen in circuses.

Many animals with horns will sometimes have single horns, a result from trauma or genetic mutation.

Goats were well known, and are not known for their wildness or great strength. So I do not think goats are an accurate description for "Reym" but I do think are an accurate explanation for medieval accounts and the root to the more modern representation of a stallion with one horn.

http://io9.com...

Ultimately Unicorns are not as mythical as some people believe. They are real and easily explained by facts.

Is it possible that "monokeros" is a mistranslation?
Thinking is extremely taxing on the gullible, and it takes hours to clear the smoke.
Mhykiel
Posts: 5,987
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1/1/2015 9:51:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 9:40:11 PM, Kyle_the_Heretic wrote:
At 1/1/2015 8:57:58 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
First I want to address the biblical unicorn. The Hebrew word often translated Unicorn is "Reym". Some modern translations, in what I feel is secular pressure to remove mythical looking creatures have translated the word lately as "wild ox".

Job 39:9 "Will the [Reym] be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?"
10 "Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?"

Psalm 29:6 "Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the [horns of the Reym]

Psalm 92:10 "But my horn shalt thou exalt like the [horn of Reym]: I shall be anointed with fresh oil."

When the Hebrew was translated into The Septuagint the word used was "monokeros" which means one horn. When this greek was translated into Latin the word used was unicornus. And from there we get the old English in the King James version "Unicorn".

It is at times hard to tell if the Reym has one Horn or Two. It is described with a notable horn and great strength. And Job asks if lowly man can yoke this creature to plow valleys. Plowing animal was the bull.

Adding these descriptions together one animal matches. A rhinoceros. Asian rhino's have one horn African rhinos have two horns, and the beast has a beast of burden type look similar to a bull. Not to mention that the Rhino's scientific Latin name is unicornus.

I think Reym is definitely a Rhinoceros.

Now what is interesting is the most detailed description of anything resembling a Unicorn is in Daniel.

Daniel 8:5 "And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground: and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes."

But the word here used was not Reym. It was the word for goat. Medieval art often depicts unicorns as small, with cloven hooves and beards, sometimes resembling goats more than horses with horns.

And some goat horns have been artificially grafted together in growing kids to produce single horns. Such animals have been seen in circuses.

Many animals with horns will sometimes have single horns, a result from trauma or genetic mutation.

Goats were well known, and are not known for their wildness or great strength. So I do not think goats are an accurate description for "Reym" but I do think are an accurate explanation for medieval accounts and the root to the more modern representation of a stallion with one horn.

http://io9.com...

Ultimately Unicorns are not as mythical as some people believe. They are real and easily explained by facts.

Is it possible that "monokeros" is a mistranslation?

Well the thing is, it's not mistranslation. "monokeros" means "one horned". Which is not a bad name for a Rhinoceros.

But I hope I have given more than just the Biblical Unicorn is a bad interpretation of context. Because some will just scream and cry that that is how every thing in the bible is explained away.

In addition I have at least hinted to the earliest accounts of unicorns match with what know to not just be possible but actual happen in real life.

Leaving me to confidently conclude that unicorns do exist. And they're representation in modern times have been an exaggerating.

I guess you could say the worst thing to happen to the truth is for it to be mistaken for mythology, then it grows out of control unable to reenter reality.
jodybirdy
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1/1/2015 9:52:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 9:40:11 PM, Kyle_the_Heretic wrote:
At 1/1/2015 8:57:58 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
First I want to address the biblical unicorn. The Hebrew word often translated Unicorn is "Reym". Some modern translations, in what I feel is secular pressure to remove mythical looking creatures have translated the word lately as "wild ox".

Job 39:9 "Will the [Reym] be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?"
10 "Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?"

Psalm 29:6 "Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the [horns of the Reym]

Psalm 92:10 "But my horn shalt thou exalt like the [horn of Reym]: I shall be anointed with fresh oil."

When the Hebrew was translated into The Septuagint the word used was "monokeros" which means one horn. When this greek was translated into Latin the word used was unicornus. And from there we get the old English in the King James version "Unicorn".

It is at times hard to tell if the Reym has one Horn or Two. It is described with a notable horn and great strength. And Job asks if lowly man can yoke this creature to plow valleys. Plowing animal was the bull.

Adding these descriptions together one animal matches. A rhinoceros. Asian rhino's have one horn African rhinos have two horns, and the beast has a beast of burden type look similar to a bull. Not to mention that the Rhino's scientific Latin name is unicornus.

I think Reym is definitely a Rhinoceros.

Now what is interesting is the most detailed description of anything resembling a Unicorn is in Daniel.

Daniel 8:5 "And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground: and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes."

But the word here used was not Reym. It was the word for goat. Medieval art often depicts unicorns as small, with cloven hooves and beards, sometimes resembling goats more than horses with horns.

And some goat horns have been artificially grafted together in growing kids to produce single horns. Such animals have been seen in circuses.

Many animals with horns will sometimes have single horns, a result from trauma or genetic mutation.

Goats were well known, and are not known for their wildness or great strength. So I do not think goats are an accurate description for "Reym" but I do think are an accurate explanation for medieval accounts and the root to the more modern representation of a stallion with one horn.

http://io9.com...

Ultimately Unicorns are not as mythical as some people believe. They are real and easily explained by facts.

Is it possible that "monokeros" is a mistranslation?

Yes. I think it is very possible that it is.
A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral."
Kyle_the_Heretic
Posts: 748
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1/1/2015 10:08:45 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 9:51:30 PM, Mhykiel wrote:

Is it possible that "monokeros" is a mistranslation?

Well the thing is, it's not mistranslation. "monokeros" means "one horned". Which is not a bad name for a Rhinoceros.

But I hope I have given more than just the Biblical Unicorn is a bad interpretation of context. Because some will just scream and cry that that is how every thing in the bible is explained away.

In addition I have at least hinted to the earliest accounts of unicorns match with what know to not just be possible but actual happen in real life.

Leaving me to confidently conclude that unicorns do exist. And they're representation in modern times have been an exaggerating.

I guess you could say the worst thing to happen to the truth is for it to be mistaken for mythology, then it grows out of control unable to reenter reality.

Most Bible scholars consider it a mistranslation.

http://en.wikipedia.org...
Thinking is extremely taxing on the gullible, and it takes hours to clear the smoke.
Kyle_the_Heretic
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1/1/2015 10:10:20 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 9:52:12 PM, jodybirdy wrote:

Is it possible that "monokeros" is a mistranslation?

Yes. I think it is very possible that it is.

:wink:
Thinking is extremely taxing on the gullible, and it takes hours to clear the smoke.
Mhykiel
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1/1/2015 10:18:17 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 10:08:45 PM, Kyle_the_Heretic wrote:
At 1/1/2015 9:51:30 PM, Mhykiel wrote:

Is it possible that "monokeros" is a mistranslation?

Well the thing is, it's not mistranslation. "monokeros" means "one horned". Which is not a bad name for a Rhinoceros.

But I hope I have given more than just the Biblical Unicorn is a bad interpretation of context. Because some will just scream and cry that that is how every thing in the bible is explained away.

In addition I have at least hinted to the earliest accounts of unicorns match with what know to not just be possible but actual happen in real life.

Leaving me to confidently conclude that unicorns do exist. And they're representation in modern times have been an exaggerating.

I guess you could say the worst thing to happen to the truth is for it to be mistaken for mythology, then it grows out of control unable to reenter reality.

Most Bible scholars consider it a mistranslation.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

The aurochs is something I have not heard. i would say that is a pretty good choice for reym as well.

Well I think the biblical use of unicorn is totally incorrect.

But I also offer an argument for a more traditional unicorn being real as well.
FaustianJustice
Posts: 6,205
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1/1/2015 10:28:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 8:57:58 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
First I want to address the biblical unicorn. The Hebrew word often translated Unicorn is "Reym". Some modern translations, in what I feel is secular pressure to remove mythical looking creatures have translated the word lately as "wild ox".

Job 39:9 "Will the [Reym] be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?"
10 "Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?"

Psalm 29:6 "Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the [horns of the Reym]

Psalm 92:10 "But my horn shalt thou exalt like the [horn of Reym]: I shall be anointed with fresh oil."

When the Hebrew was translated into The Septuagint the word used was "monokeros" which means one horn. When this greek was translated into Latin the word used was unicornus. And from there we get the old English in the King James version "Unicorn".

It is at times hard to tell if the Reym has one Horn or Two. It is described with a notable horn and great strength. And Job asks if lowly man can yoke this creature to plow valleys. Plowing animal was the bull.

Adding these descriptions together one animal matches. A rhinoceros. Asian rhino's have one horn African rhinos have two horns, and the beast has a beast of burden type look similar to a bull. Not to mention that the Rhino's scientific Latin name is unicornus.

I think Reym is definitely a Rhinoceros.

Now what is interesting is the most detailed description of anything resembling a Unicorn is in Daniel.

Daniel 8:5 "And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground: and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes."

But the word here used was not Reym. It was the word for goat. Medieval art often depicts unicorns as small, with cloven hooves and beards, sometimes resembling goats more than horses with horns.

And some goat horns have been artificially grafted together in growing kids to produce single horns. Such animals have been seen in circuses.

Many animals with horns will sometimes have single horns, a result from trauma or genetic mutation.

Goats were well known, and are not known for their wildness or great strength. So I do not think goats are an accurate description for "Reym" but I do think are an accurate explanation for medieval accounts and the root to the more modern representation of a stallion with one horn.

http://io9.com...

Ultimately Unicorns are not as mythical as some people believe. They are real and easily explained by facts.

So are yettis, abominable snow men, bigfoot, and sasquatches, or dragons if you want to really root out exactly what might have caused such a story.
Here we have an advocate for Islamic arranged marriages demonstrating that children can consent to sex.
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Kyle_the_Heretic
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1/1/2015 10:31:07 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 10:18:17 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
At 1/1/2015 10:08:45 PM, Kyle_the_Heretic wrote:
At 1/1/2015 9:51:30 PM, Mhykiel wrote:

Is it possible that "monokeros" is a mistranslation?

Well the thing is, it's not mistranslation. "monokeros" means "one horned". Which is not a bad name for a Rhinoceros.

But I hope I have given more than just the Biblical Unicorn is a bad interpretation of context. Because some will just scream and cry that that is how every thing in the bible is explained away.

In addition I have at least hinted to the earliest accounts of unicorns match with what know to not just be possible but actual happen in real life.

Leaving me to confidently conclude that unicorns do exist. And they're representation in modern times have been an exaggerating.

I guess you could say the worst thing to happen to the truth is for it to be mistaken for mythology, then it grows out of control unable to reenter reality.

Most Bible scholars consider it a mistranslation.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

The aurochs is something I have not heard. i would say that is a pretty good choice for reym as well.

Well I think the biblical use of unicorn is totally incorrect.

But I also offer an argument for a more traditional unicorn being real as well.

Medieval Europe was overflowing with romantics. What self-proclaimed fair virgin didn't want to be able to tame the the untamed beast that even the greatest knight could not master?

Sure, exaggerated stories could have turned a rhino into a single-horned horse. I've seen sillier. If that's the case, then I'll agree that a more traditional unicorn could be real.
Thinking is extremely taxing on the gullible, and it takes hours to clear the smoke.
Mhykiel
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1/1/2015 10:34:22 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 10:28:32 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:
At 1/1/2015 8:57:58 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
First I want to address the biblical unicorn. The Hebrew word often translated Unicorn is "Reym". Some modern translations, in what I feel is secular pressure to remove mythical looking creatures have translated the word lately as "wild ox".

Job 39:9 "Will the [Reym] be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?"
10 "Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?"

Psalm 29:6 "Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the [horns of the Reym]

Psalm 92:10 "But my horn shalt thou exalt like the [horn of Reym]: I shall be anointed with fresh oil."

When the Hebrew was translated into The Septuagint the word used was "monokeros" which means one horn. When this greek was translated into Latin the word used was unicornus. And from there we get the old English in the King James version "Unicorn".

It is at times hard to tell if the Reym has one Horn or Two. It is described with a notable horn and great strength. And Job asks if lowly man can yoke this creature to plow valleys. Plowing animal was the bull.

Adding these descriptions together one animal matches. A rhinoceros. Asian rhino's have one horn African rhinos have two horns, and the beast has a beast of burden type look similar to a bull. Not to mention that the Rhino's scientific Latin name is unicornus.

I think Reym is definitely a Rhinoceros.

Now what is interesting is the most detailed description of anything resembling a Unicorn is in Daniel.

Daniel 8:5 "And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground: and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes."

But the word here used was not Reym. It was the word for goat. Medieval art often depicts unicorns as small, with cloven hooves and beards, sometimes resembling goats more than horses with horns.

And some goat horns have been artificially grafted together in growing kids to produce single horns. Such animals have been seen in circuses.

Many animals with horns will sometimes have single horns, a result from trauma or genetic mutation.

Goats were well known, and are not known for their wildness or great strength. So I do not think goats are an accurate description for "Reym" but I do think are an accurate explanation for medieval accounts and the root to the more modern representation of a stallion with one horn.

http://io9.com...

Ultimately Unicorns are not as mythical as some people believe. They are real and easily explained by facts.

So are yettis, abominable snow men, bigfoot, and sasquatches, or dragons if you want to really root out exactly what might have caused such a story.

IN Borneo, they had a bigfoot type myth. They called these creatures wild men of Borneo. It was claimed to be myth, made up, imaginary. Maybe some where there was an Atheist saying God is no different than dragons, unicorns, wild men of Borneo.

Eventually scientist in the area "confirmed" the existence of orangutangs. I guess the eye witness testimonies, hair, and stories weren't evidence for anything going on.
FaustianJustice
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1/1/2015 10:40:13 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 10:34:22 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
At 1/1/2015 10:28:32 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:
At 1/1/2015 8:57:58 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
First I want to address the biblical unicorn. The Hebrew word often translated Unicorn is "Reym". Some modern translations, in what I feel is secular pressure to remove mythical looking creatures have translated the word lately as "wild ox".

Job 39:9 "Will the [Reym] be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?"
10 "Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?"

Psalm 29:6 "Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the [horns of the Reym]

Psalm 92:10 "But my horn shalt thou exalt like the [horn of Reym]: I shall be anointed with fresh oil."

When the Hebrew was translated into The Septuagint the word used was "monokeros" which means one horn. When this greek was translated into Latin the word used was unicornus. And from there we get the old English in the King James version "Unicorn".

It is at times hard to tell if the Reym has one Horn or Two. It is described with a notable horn and great strength. And Job asks if lowly man can yoke this creature to plow valleys. Plowing animal was the bull.

Adding these descriptions together one animal matches. A rhinoceros. Asian rhino's have one horn African rhinos have two horns, and the beast has a beast of burden type look similar to a bull. Not to mention that the Rhino's scientific Latin name is unicornus.

I think Reym is definitely a Rhinoceros.

Now what is interesting is the most detailed description of anything resembling a Unicorn is in Daniel.

Daniel 8:5 "And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground: and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes."

But the word here used was not Reym. It was the word for goat. Medieval art often depicts unicorns as small, with cloven hooves and beards, sometimes resembling goats more than horses with horns.

And some goat horns have been artificially grafted together in growing kids to produce single horns. Such animals have been seen in circuses.

Many animals with horns will sometimes have single horns, a result from trauma or genetic mutation.

Goats were well known, and are not known for their wildness or great strength. So I do not think goats are an accurate description for "Reym" but I do think are an accurate explanation for medieval accounts and the root to the more modern representation of a stallion with one horn.

http://io9.com...

Ultimately Unicorns are not as mythical as some people believe. They are real and easily explained by facts.

So are yettis, abominable snow men, bigfoot, and sasquatches, or dragons if you want to really root out exactly what might have caused such a story.

IN Borneo, they had a bigfoot type myth. They called these creatures wild men of Borneo. It was claimed to be myth, made up, imaginary. Maybe some where there was an Atheist saying God is no different than dragons, unicorns, wild men of Borneo.

Eventually scientist in the area "confirmed" the existence of orangutangs. I guess the eye witness testimonies, hair, and stories weren't evidence for anything going on.

Yes, and the stories fell woefully short of the actual, just like dragons, unicorns, etc. It was a tale in which imagination ran away with itself. What about an orangutang seems 'wild' to you? Its a tree dwelling fruit eater. What about a one horned creature due to grafting or mutation is 'mythical'? What made things like that impressive was a dash of the impossible, added to another dash of the implausible, but it all hinged around something INCREDIBLY mundane. There is nothing impressive about this old claw I found in some rocks... but... if its part of a large reptile... No no, a large FLYING reptile.... no no, a large flying reptile... that lives in caves and demands virgin sacrafice.... No no, a large flying reptile that lives in caves demands virginal sacrafice AND breathes fire... now that is a story to get you noticed.
Here we have an advocate for Islamic arranged marriages demonstrating that children can consent to sex.
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That1User
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1/1/2015 10:45:54 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net...

This Spongebob maganizine also proves that unicorns are real.
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DanneJeRusse
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1/1/2015 10:54:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I once bet on a leprechaun riding a unicorn in the Kentucky Derby. Won a hundred bucks.
Marrying a 6 year old and waiting until she reaches puberty and maturity before having consensual sex is better than walking up to
a stranger in a bar and proceeding to have relations with no valid proof of the intent of the person. Muhammad wins. ~ Fatihah
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Mhykiel
Posts: 5,987
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1/1/2015 11:01:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 10:40:13 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:
At 1/1/2015 10:34:22 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
At 1/1/2015 10:28:32 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:
At 1/1/2015 8:57:58 PM, Mhykiel wrote:
First I want to address the biblical unicorn. The Hebrew word often translated Unicorn is "Reym". Some modern translations, in what I feel is secular pressure to remove mythical looking creatures have translated the word lately as "wild ox".

Job 39:9 "Will the [Reym] be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?"
10 "Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?"

Psalm 29:6 "Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the [horns of the Reym]

Psalm 92:10 "But my horn shalt thou exalt like the [horn of Reym]: I shall be anointed with fresh oil."

When the Hebrew was translated into The Septuagint the word used was "monokeros" which means one horn. When this greek was translated into Latin the word used was unicornus. And from there we get the old English in the King James version "Unicorn".

It is at times hard to tell if the Reym has one Horn or Two. It is described with a notable horn and great strength. And Job asks if lowly man can yoke this creature to plow valleys. Plowing animal was the bull.

Adding these descriptions together one animal matches. A rhinoceros. Asian rhino's have one horn African rhinos have two horns, and the beast has a beast of burden type look similar to a bull. Not to mention that the Rhino's scientific Latin name is unicornus.

I think Reym is definitely a Rhinoceros.

Now what is interesting is the most detailed description of anything resembling a Unicorn is in Daniel.

Daniel 8:5 "And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west on the face of the whole earth, and touched not the ground: and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes."

But the word here used was not Reym. It was the word for goat. Medieval art often depicts unicorns as small, with cloven hooves and beards, sometimes resembling goats more than horses with horns.

And some goat horns have been artificially grafted together in growing kids to produce single horns. Such animals have been seen in circuses.

Many animals with horns will sometimes have single horns, a result from trauma or genetic mutation.

Goats were well known, and are not known for their wildness or great strength. So I do not think goats are an accurate description for "Reym" but I do think are an accurate explanation for medieval accounts and the root to the more modern representation of a stallion with one horn.

http://io9.com...

Ultimately Unicorns are not as mythical as some people believe. They are real and easily explained by facts.

So are yettis, abominable snow men, bigfoot, and sasquatches, or dragons if you want to really root out exactly what might have caused such a story.

IN Borneo, they had a bigfoot type myth. They called these creatures wild men of Borneo. It was claimed to be myth, made up, imaginary. Maybe some where there was an Atheist saying God is no different than dragons, unicorns, wild men of Borneo.

Eventually scientist in the area "confirmed" the existence of orangutangs. I guess the eye witness testimonies, hair, and stories weren't evidence for anything going on.

Yes, and the stories fell woefully short of the actual, just like dragons, unicorns, etc. It was a tale in which imagination ran away with itself. What about an orangutang seems 'wild' to you? Its a tree dwelling fruit eater. What about a one horned creature due to grafting or mutation is 'mythical'? What made things like that impressive was a dash of the impossible, added to another dash of the implausible, but it all hinged around something INCREDIBLY mundane. There is nothing impressive about this old claw I found in some rocks... but... if its part of a large reptile... No no, a large FLYING reptile.... no no, a large flying reptile... that lives in caves and demands virgin sacrafice.... No no, a large flying reptile that lives in caves demands virginal sacrafice AND breathes fire... now that is a story to get you noticed.

So throw out the truth with the imagination.
Mhykiel
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1/2/2015 4:57:49 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/1/2015 9:14:44 PM, Vox_Veritas wrote:
Goats are awesome. Just felt the need to insert that.

And they are unicorns.