Total Posts:6|Showing Posts:1-6
Jump to topic:

Buddhist Theory of Morality

GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2010 2:34:13 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
After being a bit undecided on a stance of morality, I decided to look into what the Buddhist ethics are grounded on.

"There are no moral absolutes in Buddhism and it is recognized that ethical decision-making involves a complex nexus of causes and conditions. 'Buddhism' encompasses a wide spectrum of beliefs and practices, and the canonical scriptures leave room for a range of interpretations. All of these are grounded in a theory of intentionality, and individuals are encouraged to analyze issues carefully for themselves. ... When making moral choices, individuals are advised to examine their motivation--whether aversion, attachment, ignorance, wisdom, or compassion--and to weigh the consequences of their actions in light of the Buddha's teachings." motivation--whether aversion, attachment, ignorance, wisdom, or compassion--and to weigh the consequences of their actions in light of the Buddha's teachings."

- http://www.buddhism.about.com...

The theory of intentionality does not entail or assign certain actions to be wrong. The same action can either be a moral one or a cruel one depending on the circumstance. So its neither absolute nor subjective morality.

Is anyone else aware of the theory of intentionality and is it a sound moral system?

.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2010 6:24:41 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
Intention and consequence, that is pretty much the instinctive or natural way of judging morals.
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2010 7:31:20 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 6/16/2010 6:24:41 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
Intention and consequence, that is pretty much the instinctive or natural way of judging morals.

This system, which is neither absolute nor subjective, contradicts your asertions about morality.

You said:

"morality is subjective."
"Socialisation, morality is conditioning."
"A persons morals are the result of how they were raised, how they reacted to being raised. It varies from person to person, culture to culture."
"Morality is socialisation."

You seem to adhere to morality as ascribed by arbitrary rules of conduct by parents and society.

This is not compatible with the moral theory of intention.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/17/2010 5:16:25 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 6/16/2010 7:31:20 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 6/16/2010 6:24:41 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
Intention and consequence, that is pretty much the instinctive or natural way of judging morals.

This system, which is neither absolute nor subjective, contradicts your asertions about morality.

You said:

"morality is subjective."
"Socialisation, morality is conditioning."
"A persons morals are the result of how they were raised, how they reacted to being raised. It varies from person to person, culture to culture."
"Morality is socialisation."

You seem to adhere to morality as ascribed by arbitrary rules of conduct by parents and society.

This is not compatible with the moral theory of intention.

Sorry I don't see an argument there at all.
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
badger
Posts: 11,793
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/17/2010 8:18:16 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 6/16/2010 2:34:13 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
After being a bit undecided on a stance of morality, I decided to look into what the Buddhist ethics are grounded on.

"There are no moral absolutes in Buddhism and it is recognized that ethical decision-making involves a complex nexus of causes and conditions. 'Buddhism' encompasses a wide spectrum of beliefs and practices, and the canonical scriptures leave room for a range of interpretations. All of these are grounded in a theory of intentionality, and individuals are encouraged to analyze issues carefully for themselves. ... When making moral choices, individuals are advised to examine their motivation--whether aversion, attachment, ignorance, wisdom, or compassion--and to weigh the consequences of their actions in light of the Buddha's teachings." motivation--whether aversion, attachment, ignorance, wisdom, or compassion--and to weigh the consequences of their actions in light of the Buddha's teachings."

- http://www.buddhism.about.com...

The theory of intentionality does not entail or assign certain actions to be wrong. The same action can either be a moral one or a cruel one depending on the circumstance. So its neither absolute nor subjective morality.

Is anyone else aware of the theory of intentionality and is it a sound moral system?

.

sounds kinda absolute to me.
signature