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Chris Hedges

ChristianPunk
Posts: 1,710
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1/22/2015 11:06:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
He is an interesting Christian character who used to write for the NY Times. He has written books against Right Wing politics and fundamentalist Christianity. One of his famous books is entitled "American Fascists" where he considers the Tea Party and Right Wing to be a new rise of fascism. He has also written books such as "I Don't Believe in Atheists" and "When Atheism Becomes Religion". He pretty much argues in the last 2 books that the Right Wing has succeeded in turning a generation of atheists known as the "New Atheists", to become right wing fundamentalist that use right wing Christian tactics and have established a religion without knowing it. He has also had a chance to debate Christopher Hitchens and Sam Harris.

My view is that he does have some valid points on both topics. What are your thoughts?
Idealist
Posts: 2,520
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1/22/2015 11:35:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/22/2015 11:06:05 PM, ChristianPunk wrote:
He is an interesting Christian character who used to write for the NY Times. He has written books against Right Wing politics and fundamentalist Christianity. One of his famous books is entitled "American Fascists" where he considers the Tea Party and Right Wing to be a new rise of fascism. He has also written books such as "I Don't Believe in Atheists" and "When Atheism Becomes Religion". He pretty much argues in the last 2 books that the Right Wing has succeeded in turning a generation of atheists known as the "New Atheists", to become right wing fundamentalist that use right wing Christian tactics and have established a religion without knowing it. He has also had a chance to debate Christopher Hitchens and Sam Harris.

My view is that he does have some valid points on both topics. What are your thoughts?





I think you (and he) are on to something here. There is definitely a subgroup of atheists, often referred to as "new atheists" whose tactics mimic those of the extreme right. In fact, I'll probably be attacked for even saying this. I think the biggest mistake that all "sides" make is that they are exposed to extremism from a few members of a particular group and then jump to the conclusion that the group as a whole embraces the same views and tactics. The "new atheists" seem to actively seek-out the most fundamental religionists they can find, for it these people who provide the best backboard for contrasting their own arguments. Argue with an intellectually limited person and you are almost sure to come-off as being smarter yourself (a fallacy, of course). The religious right are known for attacking those who hold ideas rather than the ideas themselves. I guess they find it easier.