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Islam: Malcolm and Martin

Fatihah
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2/14/2015 1:37:03 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Growing up in America, I can recall black history month where there were many depictions in school and on television about great black leaders and inventors throughout black history. However, none took the spotlight like Martin Luther King Jr. There were many documentaries and shows talking about the civil rights movement and how MLK impacted the movement and changed America with his non-violent approach.

At the same time, I can recall a photographic poster of a man in my bathroom growing up, holding a rifle and looking out the window. The top of the photo read "By Any Means Necessary". That man was Malcolm X. Yet I never saw Malcolm X in any documentary or depicted on TV as a great civil rights leaders when I was growing up. It was not until the Movie by Spike Lee entitled Malcolm X in the early 90's that I can recall such a depiction and people talking about him as a great leader. But still, the talk is not much in the media. Only in the neighborhood and corners of black America. As I got older, and being memorized by the photo in my bathroom as a child and learning that he was a Muslim like myself, it was then that I began to research Malcolm X and read his autobiography to know more of him. For I had a belief based on the photo (and other photos and artwork in the black community) and religion alone as young man that Malcolm X was a strong, militant, intelligent, Muslim leader who was not to be messed with and my curiosity to learn more of him grew when I got the chance.

What I learned is that he differed from Martin. While Martin believed in non-violence, following the philosophy of Gandhi, Malcolm X said to obey the law and be loving and kind and not to fight and attack anyone, accept if someone attacks you. Malcolm X philosophy of self-defense always resonates with me more than the philosophy of Martin, and no one I know of disagrees with self-defense. Yet it is Martin that is praised in the media. Never Malcolm. This got me thinking. Why?

Anyways, I continued to be fascinated by Malcolm X and never paid attention to Martin. Malcolm X speeches would move me tremendously. His talk of being proud to be black, on teaching black history, along with fighting back the oppressor was never what Marin spoke about. He taught that instead of begging the oppressor or government to give them rights, that we as black people should unite together and build our own nation and take care of ourselves. His fearlessness to speak and do so intellectually, on the problem of racism and expressing how black people really feel against the government and oppression was unique and powerful. As a result, the media would put them together and contrast them, and show how everyone favored Martin more. Yet no one could deny the fast growing Movement of the Nation of Islam, where Malcolm X began his ascend.

Malcolm X was a Muslim leader of th Nation of Islam, which taught that the "White Man" was an enemy. This is what caused him to be a controversial figure because during those times, Whites would discriminate, segregate, hang, and kill, black people with no shame. So for a man to go out publically and criticise a white person, while leading a group of black militant people who will not turn the other cheek like Martin but will actually fight back caused white America to fear him. This caused much of black America to even be afraid of socializing or supporting Malcolm X themselves because they were afraid that whites may attack them. In short, mostly everyone rejected Malcolm X in th media and praised Martin.

Malcolm X did eventually leave the Nation of Islam and the message the White Man is the enemy or the devil, after a pilgrimage to Mecca. There, he embraced true Islam, and abandoned his belief of White People. He believed in brotherhood of all races and was willing to work with anyone, no matter their race or color, as long as they were devoted to changing the conditions of oppression of Black people in America. Yet his devotion to fight in self-defense never went away. He never adopted nonviolence. So when people are asked who is better or whose message was better, what is the answer? Martin of course. Also, when a Muslim says to fight only in self-defense or fight oppression, people will criticize it and say it is wrong and that the better approach is that Of Martin. That you can actually be more effective with non-violence. Even Christians use this type of language when arguing against the Prophet Muhammad (saw) and praising Jesus (RA). So who's movement or message was better? Martin or Malcolm X. Well, little does everyone know is how the followers of Martin and his movement ...CHANGED.

After the death of Malcolm x, another group called SNCC led by Stokely Carmichael, took notice to the message of Malcolm X. They began to organize and march alongside MLK but preached "Black Power". They did not believe in nonviolence. Meanwhile, people following Martin were getting fed up with constantly marching and being attacked in the process. During Martin's last march, when whites began to throw things and instigate violence during the march, the black people shouted "Black Power" and fought back. Martin was depressed was upset, as this was the first march ever that became violent.

Shortly after, Martin was assassinated. Yet the movement continued, but branched off into and spawned different groups and mind states against non-violence. The Black Panther Party was formed, who was a militant group against non-violence in the 1970's. At the same time, black leaders began to move into politics in an effort to have their own political control and build their own "Nation". A national black convention in Gary, Indiana was held, where Jesse Jackson inspired the crowd with chants of "It's nation time". Blacks began to identify themselves with Africa more, wearing their hair naturally with afros, wearing African clothes and performing African dances, and creating their own holiday "Kwanza". Violent protests and riots, instead of peaceful protests, began to be a common factor in the movement. In short, the 70's and 80's saw more political leaders, an increase in human rights for blacks, and more blacks being proud of their ancestry, following the militant message of Malcolm X rather than Martin. They also accomplished more than Malcolm X himself.

So what this shows is that it was not a case of Martin is better or vice Versa. It was a case of the two movements "Coming Together". The quick results to human rights in a short time came about when those united in nonviolence broke away and became violent in self-defense. But wait, the pattern of the movements and their coming together is reminiscing of another movement. What movement is that?

Both critics and non-critics alike will say, that Prophet Muhammad began his mission as a peaceful person, uniting the people with peace and not using violence. Then once the people were united, THEN Muhammad fought in defense. This is the message of Islam. This is the message of Malcolm x. This is the example of Muhammad (saw).

So Martin Luther King Jr.'s message of nonviolence was not something against Islam or Malcolm x, nor is it better. Rather, his message of non-violence is a part of Islam and shows how Allah used his message with Islamic principles to free Blacks in America. The same way Prophet Muhammad used it to free humanity in the message of Islam.
DanneJeRusse
Posts: 12,623
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2/14/2015 2:59:33 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 2/14/2015 1:37:03 PM, Fatihah wrote:
Growing up in America, I can recall black history month where there were many depictions in school and on television about great black leaders and inventors throughout black history. However, none took the spotlight like Martin Luther King Jr. There were many documentaries and shows talking about the civil rights movement and how MLK impacted the movement and changed America with his non-violent approach.

At the same time, I can recall a photographic poster of a man in my bathroom growing up, holding a rifle and looking out the window. The top of the photo read "By Any Means Necessary". That man was Malcolm X. Yet I never saw Malcolm X in any documentary or depicted on TV as a great civil rights leaders when I was growing up. It was not until the Movie by Spike Lee entitled Malcolm X in the early 90's that I can recall such a depiction and people talking about him as a great leader. But still, the talk is not much in the media. Only in the neighborhood and corners of black America. As I got older, and being memorized by the photo in my bathroom as a child and learning that he was a Muslim like myself, it was then that I began to research Malcolm X and read his autobiography to know more of him. For I had a belief based on the photo (and other photos and artwork in the black community) and religion alone as young man that Malcolm X was a strong, militant, intelligent, Muslim leader who was not to be messed with and my curiosity to learn more of him grew when I got the chance.

What I learned is that he differed from Martin. While Martin believed in non-violence, following the philosophy of Gandhi, Malcolm X said to obey the law and be loving and kind and not to fight and attack anyone, accept if someone attacks you. Malcolm X philosophy of self-defense always resonates with me more than the philosophy of Martin, and no one I know of disagrees with self-defense. Yet it is Martin that is praised in the media. Never Malcolm. This got me thinking. Why?

Anyways, I continued to be fascinated by Malcolm X and never paid attention to Martin. Malcolm X speeches would move me tremendously. His talk of being proud to be black, on teaching black history, along with fighting back the oppressor was never what Marin spoke about. He taught that instead of begging the oppressor or government to give them rights, that we as black people should unite together and build our own nation and take care of ourselves. His fearlessness to speak and do so intellectually, on the problem of racism and expressing how black people really feel against the government and oppression was unique and powerful. As a result, the media would put them together and contrast them, and show how everyone favored Martin more. Yet no one could deny the fast growing Movement of the Nation of Islam, where Malcolm X began his ascend.

Malcolm X was a Muslim leader of th Nation of Islam, which taught that the "White Man" was an enemy. This is what caused him to be a controversial figure because during those times, Whites would discriminate, segregate, hang, and kill, black people with no shame. So for a man to go out publically and criticise a white person, while leading a group of black militant people who will not turn the other cheek like Martin but will actually fight back caused white America to fear him. This caused much of black America to even be afraid of socializing or supporting Malcolm X themselves because they were afraid that whites may attack them. In short, mostly everyone rejected Malcolm X in th media and praised Martin.

Malcolm X did eventually leave the Nation of Islam and the message the White Man is the enemy or the devil, after a pilgrimage to Mecca. There, he embraced true Islam, and abandoned his belief of White People. He believed in brotherhood of all races and was willing to work with anyone, no matter their race or color, as long as they were devoted to changing the conditions of oppression of Black people in America. Yet his devotion to fight in self-defense never went away. He never adopted nonviolence. So when people are asked who is better or whose message was better, what is the answer? Martin of course. Also, when a Muslim says to fight only in self-defense or fight oppression, people will criticize it and say it is wrong and that the better approach is that Of Martin. That you can actually be more effective with non-violence. Even Christians use this type of language when arguing against the Prophet Muhammad (saw) and praising Jesus (RA). So who's movement or message was better? Martin or Malcolm X. Well, little does everyone know is how the followers of Martin and his movement ...CHANGED.

After the death of Malcolm x, another group called SNCC led by Stokely Carmichael, took notice to the message of Malcolm X. They began to organize and march alongside MLK but preached "Black Power". They did not believe in nonviolence. Meanwhile, people following Martin were getting fed up with constantly marching and being attacked in the process. During Martin's last march, when whites began to throw things and instigate violence during the march, the black people shouted "Black Power" and fought back. Martin was depressed was upset, as this was the first march ever that became violent.

Shortly after, Martin was assassinated. Yet the movement continued, but branched off into and spawned different groups and mind states against non-violence. The Black Panther Party was formed, who was a militant group against non-violence in the 1970's. At the same time, black leaders began to move into politics in an effort to have their own political control and build their own "Nation". A national black convention in Gary, Indiana was held, where Jesse Jackson inspired the crowd with chants of "It's nation time". Blacks began to identify themselves with Africa more, wearing their hair naturally with afros, wearing African clothes and performing African dances, and creating their own holiday "Kwanza". Violent protests and riots, instead of peaceful protests, began to be a common factor in the movement. In short, the 70's and 80's saw more political leaders, an increase in human rights for blacks, and more blacks being proud of their ancestry, following the militant message of Malcolm X rather than Martin. They also accomplished more than Malcolm X himself.

So what this shows is that it was not a case of Martin is better or vice Versa. It was a case of the two movements "Coming Together". The quick results to human rights in a short time came about when those united in nonviolence broke away and became violent in self-defense. But wait, the pattern of the movements and their coming together is reminiscing of another movement. What movement is that?

Both critics and non-critics alike will say, that Prophet Muhammad began his mission as a peaceful person, uniting the people with peace and not using violence. Then once the people were united, THEN Muhammad fought in defense. This is the message of Islam. This is the message of Malcolm x. This is the example of Muhammad (saw).

So Martin Luther King Jr.'s message of nonviolence was not something against Islam or Malcolm x, nor is it better. Rather, his message of non-violence is a part of Islam and shows how Allah used his message with Islamic principles to free Blacks in America. The same way Prophet Muhammad used it to free humanity in the message of Islam.

So, what you're trying to say is that as a Muslim, you prefer Malcolm X and Islam because you prefer violence over non-violence.
Marrying a 6 year old and waiting until she reaches puberty and maturity before having consensual sex is better than walking up to
a stranger in a bar and proceeding to have relations with no valid proof of the intent of the person. Muhammad wins. ~ Fatihah
If they don't want to be killed then they have to subdue to the Islamic laws. - Uncung
Without God, you are lower than sh!t. ~ SpiritandTruth
Fatihah
Posts: 7,741
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2/14/2015 3:41:18 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 2/14/2015 2:59:33 PM, DanneJeRusse wrote:
At 2/14/2015 1:37:03 PM, Fatihah wrote:
Growing up in America, I can recall black history month where there were many depictions in school and on television about great black leaders and inventors throughout black history. However, none took the spotlight like Martin Luther King Jr. There were many documentaries and shows talking about the civil rights movement and how MLK impacted the movement and changed America with his non-violent approach.

At the same time, I can recall a photographic poster of a man in my bathroom growing up, holding a rifle and looking out the window. The top of the photo read "By Any Means Necessary". That man was Malcolm X. Yet I never saw Malcolm X in any documentary or depicted on TV as a great civil rights leaders when I was growing up. It was not until the Movie by Spike Lee entitled Malcolm X in the early 90's that I can recall such a depiction and people talking about him as a great leader. But still, the talk is not much in the media. Only in the neighborhood and corners of black America. As I got older, and being memorized by the photo in my bathroom as a child and learning that he was a Muslim like myself, it was then that I began to research Malcolm X and read his autobiography to know more of him. For I had a belief based on the photo (and other photos and artwork in the black community) and religion alone as young man that Malcolm X was a strong, militant, intelligent, Muslim leader who was not to be messed with and my curiosity to learn more of him grew when I got the chance.

What I learned is that he differed from Martin. While Martin believed in non-violence, following the philosophy of Gandhi, Malcolm X said to obey the law and be loving and kind and not to fight and attack anyone, accept if someone attacks you. Malcolm X philosophy of self-defense always resonates with me more than the philosophy of Martin, and no one I know of disagrees with self-defense. Yet it is Martin that is praised in the media. Never Malcolm. This got me thinking. Why?

Anyways, I continued to be fascinated by Malcolm X and never paid attention to Martin. Malcolm X speeches would move me tremendously. His talk of being proud to be black, on teaching black history, along with fighting back the oppressor was never what Marin spoke about. He taught that instead of begging the oppressor or government to give them rights, that we as black people should unite together and build our own nation and take care of ourselves. His fearlessness to speak and do so intellectually, on the problem of racism and expressing how black people really feel against the government and oppression was unique and powerful. As a result, the media would put them together and contrast them, and show how everyone favored Martin more. Yet no one could deny the fast growing Movement of the Nation of Islam, where Malcolm X began his ascend.

Malcolm X was a Muslim leader of th Nation of Islam, which taught that the "White Man" was an enemy. This is what caused him to be a controversial figure because during those times, Whites would discriminate, segregate, hang, and kill, black people with no shame. So for a man to go out publically and criticise a white person, while leading a group of black militant people who will not turn the other cheek like Martin but will actually fight back caused white America to fear him. This caused much of black America to even be afraid of socializing or supporting Malcolm X themselves because they were afraid that whites may attack them. In short, mostly everyone rejected Malcolm X in th media and praised Martin.

Malcolm X did eventually leave the Nation of Islam and the message the White Man is the enemy or the devil, after a pilgrimage to Mecca. There, he embraced true Islam, and abandoned his belief of White People. He believed in brotherhood of all races and was willing to work with anyone, no matter their race or color, as long as they were devoted to changing the conditions of oppression of Black people in America. Yet his devotion to fight in self-defense never went away. He never adopted nonviolence. So when people are asked who is better or whose message was better, what is the answer? Martin of course. Also, when a Muslim says to fight only in self-defense or fight oppression, people will criticize it and say it is wrong and that the better approach is that Of Martin. That you can actually be more effective with non-violence. Even Christians use this type of language when arguing against the Prophet Muhammad (saw) and praising Jesus (RA). So who's movement or message was better? Martin or Malcolm X. Well, little does everyone know is how the followers of Martin and his movement ...CHANGED.

After the death of Malcolm x, another group called SNCC led by Stokely Carmichael, took notice to the message of Malcolm X. They began to organize and march alongside MLK but preached "Black Power". They did not believe in nonviolence. Meanwhile, people following Martin were getting fed up with constantly marching and being attacked in the process. During Martin's last march, when whites began to throw things and instigate violence during the march, the black people shouted "Black Power" and fought back. Martin was depressed was upset, as this was the first march ever that became violent.

Shortly after, Martin was assassinated. Yet the movement continued, but branched off into and spawned different groups and mind states against non-violence. The Black Panther Party was formed, who was a militant group against non-violence in the 1970's. At the same time, black leaders began to move into politics in an effort to have their own political control and build their own "Nation". A national black convention in Gary, Indiana was held, where Jesse Jackson inspired the crowd with chants of "It's nation time". Blacks began to identify themselves with Africa more, wearing their hair naturally with afros, wearing African clothes and performing African dances, and creating their own holiday "Kwanza". Violent protests and riots, instead of peaceful protests, began to be a common factor in the movement. In short, the 70's and 80's saw more political leaders, an increase in human rights for blacks, and more blacks being proud of their ancestry, following the militant message of Malcolm X rather than Martin. They also accomplished more than Malcolm X himself.

So what this shows is that it was not a case of Martin is better or vice Versa. It was a case of the two movements "Coming Together". The quick results to human rights in a short time came about when those united in nonviolence broke away and became violent in self-defense. But wait, the pattern of the movements and their coming together is reminiscing of another movement. What movement is that?

Both critics and non-critics alike will say, that Prophet Muhammad began his mission as a peaceful person, uniting the people with peace and not using violence. Then once the people were united, THEN Muhammad fought in defense. This is the message of Islam. This is the message of Malcolm x. This is the example of Muhammad (saw).

So Martin Luther King Jr.'s message of nonviolence was not something against Islam or Malcolm x, nor is it better. Rather, his message of non-violence is a part of Islam and shows how Allah used his message with Islamic principles to free Blacks in America. The same way Prophet Muhammad used it to free humanity in the message of Islam.

So, what you're trying to say is that as a Muslim, you prefer Malcolm X and Islam because you prefer violence over non-violence.

Response: I prefer what is best and based on the fact that the followers of Martin themselves do not practice non-violence and got their rights out of sef-defense, then it shows how Martin's philosophy works best with Islamic principles.