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The Archetypal Christ

s-anthony
Posts: 2,582
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3/24/2015 1:58:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
The Christian christ in the Western mind is a very great and human symbol, an archetype of tremendous importance. That the unknown and invisible god, the god without an image or a name, one from which creation is hidden should take a form and receive a name in the person of Christ; the invisible is now made known, the nameless is now familiar, and the divine has itself become human.

In Christ, the object of one's faith is to make the unconscious mind known, it is to marry the spirit with the body, giving that which is without form, shape. Yet, in the story of Christ, he comes from obscurity as the son of a poor carpenter; he is no more than a commoner; however, as he is baptized by John, his immersion symbolizes his death as a common man and resurrection as the christ. He is favored and chosen by Heaven to speak to the children of Earth. This is the calling of each of us, a calling to put to death the self, submerged into the murky waters of the unconsciousness, to rise as a child of Earth and Heaven.

In Christianity, the humanity of Christ is not lost; in fact, it is made eternal; in Christian dogma, he is forever known as the God-man. So, we too must unite ourselves with our unconscious minds, our fleshly desires with that mystical side of our being. It is not enough to define who we are and announce to the world our presence; we must always remain mystical, hidden, and a land unexplored.
Gentorev
Posts: 2,876
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3/24/2015 5:29:33 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/24/2015 1:58:44 PM, s-anthony wrote:
The Christian christ in the Western mind is a very great and human symbol, an archetype of tremendous importance. That the unknown and invisible god, the god without an image or a name, one from which creation is hidden should take a form and receive a name in the person of Christ; the invisible is now made known, the nameless is now familiar, and the divine has itself become human.

In Christ, the object of one's faith is to make the unconscious mind known, it is to marry the spirit with the body, giving that which is without form, shape. Yet, in the story of Christ, he comes from obscurity as the son of a poor carpenter; he is no more than a commoner; however, as he is baptized by John, his immersion symbolizes his death as a common man and resurrection as the christ. He is favored and chosen by Heaven to speak to the children of Earth. This is the calling of each of us, a calling to put to death the self, submerged into the murky waters of the unconsciousness, to rise as a child of Earth and Heaven.

In Christianity, the humanity of Christ is not lost; in fact, it is made eternal; in Christian dogma, he is forever known as the God-man. So, we too must unite ourselves with our unconscious minds, our fleshly desires with that mystical side of our being. It is not enough to define who we are and announce to the world our presence; we must always remain mystical, hidden, and a land unexplored.

Oh come on now, how can you call the man Jesus a commoner? Jesus, the great grand son of Yehoshua/Jesus III, who was the high priest in Jerusalem from 36 to 23 BC. on his mothers side, and great grandson of Mark Anthony on his fathers side?
The tongue, the sharp two edged sword that divides the spirit from the soul.
s-anthony
Posts: 2,582
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3/24/2015 6:17:23 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/24/2015 5:29:33 PM, Gentorev wrote:
At 3/24/2015 1:58:44 PM, s-anthony wrote:
The Christian christ in the Western mind is a very great and human symbol, an archetype of tremendous importance. That the unknown and invisible god, the god without an image or a name, one from which creation is hidden should take a form and receive a name in the person of Christ; the invisible is now made known, the nameless is now familiar, and the divine has itself become human.

In Christ, the object of one's faith is to make the unconscious mind known, it is to marry the spirit with the body, giving that which is without form, shape. Yet, in the story of Christ, he comes from obscurity as the son of a poor carpenter; he is no more than a commoner; however, as he is baptized by John, his immersion symbolizes his death as a common man and resurrection as the christ. He is favored and chosen by Heaven to speak to the children of Earth. This is the calling of each of us, a calling to put to death the self, submerged into the murky waters of the unconsciousness, to rise as a child of Earth and Heaven.

In Christianity, the humanity of Christ is not lost; in fact, it is made eternal; in Christian dogma, he is forever known as the God-man. So, we too must unite ourselves with our unconscious minds, our fleshly desires with that mystical side of our being. It is not enough to define who we are and announce to the world our presence; we must always remain mystical, hidden, and a land unexplored.

Oh come on now, how can you call the man Jesus a commoner? Jesus, the great grand son of Yehoshua/Jesus III, who was the high priest in Jerusalem from 36 to 23 BC. on his mothers side, and great grandson of Mark Anthony on his fathers side?

I'm not speaking from history but from myth. The history of the Christian narrative has little relevance, if any, to the Christian myth.