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Can u be religious and tolerate other views?

twocupcakes
Posts: 2,750
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5/25/2015 9:49:23 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I think there are many good, moral, tolerant people who are religious. I think it is great that many religious people respect other religions and other religious points of view.

However, I find that being religious (especially extremely religious) and tolerating other religious views can be somewhat incompatible.

If you believe in a certain religion, I assume you believe your religion is 100% correct (otherwise you would be agnostic). I find it a bit arrogant if someone believes they are 100% correct, since there is conclusive evidence to prove any religion.

Further, if you believe you are 100% correct, then you believe everyone else is wrong. I find it intolerant to believe someone else is wrong, with no conclusive evidence.

Everyone has biased beliefs. For example, I believe my favourite sports teams are the best. However, deep down I know this is just because I am biased, and is not really true, it is just fun to have this belief.

How can you be religious and tolerant? Do religious people deep down know that they are not 100% correct? How can you believe you are correct and everyone else is wrong while being tolerant?
JJ50
Posts: 2,144
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5/25/2015 9:51:29 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 9:49:23 AM, twocupcakes wrote:
I think there are many good, moral, tolerant people who are religious. I think it is great that many religious people respect other religions and other religious points of view.

However, I find that being religious (especially extremely religious) and tolerating other religious views can be somewhat incompatible.

If you believe in a certain religion, I assume you believe your religion is 100% correct (otherwise you would be agnostic). I find it a bit arrogant if someone believes they are 100% correct, since there is conclusive evidence to prove any religion.

Further, if you believe you are 100% correct, then you believe everyone else is wrong. I find it intolerant to believe someone else is wrong, with no conclusive evidence.

Everyone has biased beliefs. For example, I believe my favourite sports teams are the best. However, deep down I know this is just because I am biased, and is not really true, it is just fun to have this belief.

How can you be religious and tolerant? Do religious people deep down know that they are not 100% correct? How can you believe you are correct and everyone else is wrong while being tolerant?

I know a number Christians who are very tolerant of the point of view of others, just as I know some who are very intolerant.
EtrnlVw
Posts: 2,307
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5/25/2015 1:50:07 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 9:49:23 AM, twocupcakes wrote:
I think there are many good, moral, tolerant people who are religious. I think it is great that many religious people respect other religions and other religious points of view.

However, I find that being religious (especially extremely religious) and tolerating other religious views can be somewhat incompatible.

If you believe in a certain religion, I assume you believe your religion is 100% correct (otherwise you would be agnostic). I find it a bit arrogant if someone believes they are 100% correct, since there is conclusive evidence to prove any religion.

Further, if you believe you are 100% correct, then you believe everyone else is wrong. I find it intolerant to believe someone else is wrong, with no conclusive evidence.

Everyone has biased beliefs. For example, I believe my favourite sports teams are the best. However, deep down I know this is just because I am biased, and is not really true, it is just fun to have this belief.

How can you be religious and tolerant? Do religious people deep down know that they are not 100% correct? How can you believe you are correct and everyone else is wrong while being tolerant?

The answer is simple, hold fast to that which you believe is true AND love others as yourself. You don't need to forsake the one for the other. Do both, tolerance extends love, love enables trust, trust enables unity.
I may very well have some issues with some religious beliefs but that doesn't mean I have to show hate to the people, I can love the people but disapprove of the system.
At the end of the day we stand before God alone.
RuvDraba
Posts: 6,033
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5/25/2015 3:37:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 9:49:23 AM, twocupcakes wrote:
How can you be religious and tolerant?

There's no way around it: I think you have to hold that pluralism is as important as faith.

Some religious people definitely do believe that. The US, for example, was founded by a group of Christians and Deists who believed strongly in pluralism (in part because of the appalling history in Europe of the day.) That tradition has been inherited by the US, which has done a fair job of religious pluralism by world standards.

However, the love isn't spread evenly. A 2014 Pew report on religious cordiality between US faiths identified who likes whom more and less, and may therefore speak to who is better at tolerating others. [http://www.pewforum.org...] On average, Americans like Jews, Catholics and Evangelical Christians the most, and Atheists and Muslims the least. However, when you break down the sentiments by sectarian group, it starts getting disparate.

A great deal of anti-atheistic and anti-Muslim sentiment comes specifically from white Evangelicals and black Protestants. Although Muslim sentiment isn't reported, Atheists at least have responded in kind: while they're neutral or better to everyone (including doorknocking Mormons), they not fond of white Evangelicals. [http://www.pewforum.org...]

Over-all, if you exclude sentiment toward one's own broader group (e.g. Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, nontheistic) and take unweighted averages, the most cordial group are agnostics (52.5), closely followed by people of no particular belief (51.7) and white mainline beliefs (51.2). Catholics, Jews and Atheists are clumped not far behind in the 49-50 range, while black protestants and white evangelicals are way down on their own at 44.7 and 44.4 respectively.

If cordiality is a measure of tolerance then, we might conclude that some are doing better than others.