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Do American Christians Want A Theocracy?

RoderickSpode
Posts: 2,371
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10/31/2015 7:40:18 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
This issue has been discussed in a couple of threads, at least 2 referencing a poll that was taken suggesting 57% of Christians (specifically Republicans) want Christianity to be our official State religion.

http://www.publicpolicypolling.com...

This poll has lead to suggestions that 57% of Christian Americans (of the Republican kind) want to dismantle the Constitution, and form a Theocracy.

Well, perhaps someone got the scoop that national religion doesn't necessarily mean official religion or theocracy, as there are nations that hold to certain religions as being nationally recognized as majority or cultural religions, but not State religions. So perhaps consequently, another poll was taken by the same group. The wording has changed a bit to where the question uses the term official religion of the United States. Well, we now see a fairly big drop down to 32%. This site was linked by a site that claims 44%, but according to this poll, we now see less than half of the Republicans polled (32%) would support an official Christian State.

Let's assume that these 32% understood the difference between official religion and national religion. That official religion generally means State religion. We now need to consider that even the term official religion doesn't necessarily mean State religion or Theocracy. For instance, there are religions that are officially recognized in various countries that are not the State religion of that country. They are officially recognized as being a significant religion of that nation. So I don't think the thought pattern in both polls would be much different if at all.

I would say more proof of this is revealed in question# 3 where 87% would not want freedom of religion removed from the Constitution. That's hardly the sentiment of one who wants to establish an official religion in the theocratic sense.

A major factor here is that if a person or group is going to accuse another group (in this case Republican Christians) of supporting a theocracy, then the denomination(s) of preference has to be identified. Every Theocracy was/is under the control of a denomination, or State church associated with a denomination.

The majority of American Christians are too intelligent to want a State Religion/Theocracy. American Christians do not want to come under control of an organization, particularly since it may not even be of their own.

In addition, the majority of American Christians know full well that Christianity cannot be forced upon another, so the concept itself is anti-Christian in principle to begin with.
Skynet
Posts: 674
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11/6/2015 5:02:07 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/31/2015 7:40:18 PM, RoderickSpode wrote:
This issue has been discussed in a couple of threads, at least 2 referencing a poll that was taken suggesting 57% of Christians (specifically Republicans) want Christianity to be our official State religion.

http://www.publicpolicypolling.com...

This poll has lead to suggestions that 57% of Christian Americans (of the Republican kind) want to dismantle the Constitution, and form a Theocracy.

Well, perhaps someone got the scoop that national religion doesn't necessarily mean official religion or theocracy, as there are nations that hold to certain religions as being nationally recognized as majority or cultural religions, but not State religions. So perhaps consequently, another poll was taken by the same group. The wording has changed a bit to where the question uses the term official religion of the United States. Well, we now see a fairly big drop down to 32%. This site was linked by a site that claims 44%, but according to this poll, we now see less than half of the Republicans polled (32%) would support an official Christian State.

Let's assume that these 32% understood the difference between official religion and national religion. That official religion generally means State religion. We now need to consider that even the term official religion doesn't necessarily mean State religion or Theocracy. For instance, there are religions that are officially recognized in various countries that are not the State religion of that country. They are officially recognized as being a significant religion of that nation. So I don't think the thought pattern in both polls would be much different if at all.

I would say more proof of this is revealed in question# 3 where 87% would not want freedom of religion removed from the Constitution. That's hardly the sentiment of one who wants to establish an official religion in the theocratic sense.

A major factor here is that if a person or group is going to accuse another group (in this case Republican Christians) of supporting a theocracy, then the denomination(s) of preference has to be identified. Every Theocracy was/is under the control of a denomination, or State church associated with a denomination.

The majority of American Christians are too intelligent to want a State Religion/Theocracy. American Christians do not want to come under control of an organization, particularly since it may not even be of their own.

In addition, the majority of American Christians know full well that Christianity cannot be forced upon another, so the concept itself is anti-Christian in principle to begin with.

State-run religion didn't work well for Christians under Roman rule, and it didn't work out well under Mary Queen of Scots or the Church of England, or Communist party approved churches, and not great under Scandinavian State Lutheran churches. We are aware of this.
One perk to being a dad is you get to watch cartoons again without explaining yourself.