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The God of Buddha

PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
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12/30/2015 2:17:18 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
Looking through the internet, I found that a popular thought among many individuals is that the Buddha did not believe in God. After reading Jamshed Fozdar's "The God of Buddha," however, I was not convinced of this position. In fact, I am almost certain that Buddha knew and taught of an unknowable God and that His writings were in agreement with much of the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita in Hinduism on various matters (while many instead point to their differences).

I ask for any other insights into the matter of God in Buddhism. What has your research led you to based on Buddhist scripture? Do you think the Buddha did not believe in God? How does Buddhism and Hinduism compare overall?
UtherPenguin
Posts: 3,683
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12/30/2015 2:33:11 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
Buddhism doesn't have one specffic deity that's represented in all sects. It was a lot more common that Buddhism woudl assimilate into the religion of the local region when it enterd a new country.

For example, Buddhism by around the 3rd century BC made it's way into East Asia, however, instead of being gone from India completely.

The BUddha was incorporated into HIndu theolgy, crating a new sect Vaishnavism, which believes Gautama (Buddha) the "avatar" (or incarnation) of VIshnu (the main Hindu deity).

In China, Buddhism became a part of the "THree paths", a series of three religions (Daoism, Buddhism and Confucianism) that later proved to grow a domninat influence from dynasty to Dynasty. For example, Ch'an Buddhism was a dominant rleiigon in the early Tang Dynasty.

Some sects of Daoism also believed Buddha to have been one of many "sages" whom in somehow, or someway, aqquired Immortality.

Some sects of Buddhism have a vast pantheon of deities and an afterlife resembling Heaven and Hell (Thervada Buddhism for example). Whilst other Buddhist sects took a more pantheistic and esoteric belief system (Take Ch'an and Zen Buddhism for example, both which were popular in Heian Japan)
"Praise Allah."
~YYW
uncung
Posts: 3,455
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12/30/2015 2:54:28 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/30/2015 2:17:18 AM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
Looking through the internet, I found that a popular thought among many individuals is that the Buddha did not believe in God. After reading Jamshed Fozdar's "The God of Buddha," however, I was not convinced of this position. In fact, I am almost certain that Buddha knew and taught of an unknowable God and that His writings were in agreement with much of the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita in Hinduism on various matters (while many instead point to their differences).

I ask for any other insights into the matter of God in Buddhism. What has your research led you to based on Buddhist scripture? Do you think the Buddha did not believe in God? How does Buddhism and Hinduism compare overall?

The deity in Buddhism is unnamed. Their scripture personify God as THE, without name, such in Judaism. The Jews even avoid call The God in vain, let alone the God name.
Therefore Buddhism is not an undeity religion they believe in the High Being that constantly entitled : THE.
Take a look the passage of their scripture:
"Atthi Ajatang Abhutang Akatang Asamkhatang " (from Pali language (Indo-Arya) ).
The Un-Begotten, The Un-Created, and The Absolute.
The other attribute of deity in Buddhism is asamkhata (Un-Condition).

And read the God characteristics in this Buddhism scripture also:
"There is, monks, an unborn -- unbecome -- unmade -- unfabricated. If there were not that unborn -- unbecome -- unmade -- unfabricated, there would not be the case that emancipation from the born -- become -- made -- fabricated would be discerned. But precisely because there is an unborn -- unbecome -- unmade -- unfabricated, emancipation from the born -- become -- made -- fabricated is discerned."

The Unborn, Uncome, Unmade etc refer to God.

It is very compatible with some religious beliefs on deity such Islam.
In Islam muslim call the God as The-Ilah (Al-Lah). AL in arabic is THE in english, Der in German, La in Spain, Le in French, Yang in Indonesian, and so on.

note: ilah in Arabic is the general god(s).
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
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12/30/2015 3:52:36 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/30/2015 2:54:28 AM, uncung wrote:

The deity in Buddhism is unnamed. Their scripture personify God as THE, without name, such in Judaism. The Jews even avoid call The God in vain, let alone the God name.
"Atthi Ajatang Abhutang Akatang Asamkhatang " (from Pali language (Indo-Arya) ).
The Un-Begotten, The Un-Created, and The Absolute.
The other attribute of deity in Buddhism is asamkhata (Un-Condition).

Yes, the book I read would often emphasize that the Buddha would not use the word God, for no words can properly describe that entity beyond our comprehension. In fact, the Buddha would remain silent on these metaphysical matters, and the book pointed to the analogy the Buddha drew of a man being hit by a poisoned arrow and wishing to know who had shot it as well as the nature of the arrow before it was pulled out and he was cured.

I do not know where the term God originated, but when I use it, I do mean the Unborn, Unoriginated, Uncreated, Unformed.
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
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12/30/2015 4:01:27 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/30/2015 2:33:11 AM, UtherPenguin wrote:
Buddhism doesn't have one specffic deity that's represented in all sects. It was a lot more common that Buddhism woudl assimilate into the religion of the local region when it enterd a new country.

For example, Buddhism by around the 3rd century BC made it's way into East Asia, however, instead of being gone from India completely.

The BUddha was incorporated into HIndu theolgy, crating a new sect Vaishnavism, which believes Gautama (Buddha) the "avatar" (or incarnation) of VIshnu (the main Hindu deity).

Do some Buddhists accept this view that the Buddha is the ninth incarnation of Vishnu? I recall in the Jataka Tales that the samana the Buddha meets states, "Thou art Bhagavad, the Blessed One," and this title was also used for Krishna, believed to be the eighth incarnation of Vishnu.

Also a related matter, in the Jataka Tales it is stated that "The Buddhas are beings whose words cannot fail; there is no departure from truth in their speech." Is it commonly accepted among Buddhists that the Buddha was infallible?


Some sects of Daoism also believed Buddha to have been one of many "sages" whom in somehow, or someway, aqquired Immortality.

Is it a "regular" view among Buddhists that the Buddha has acquired immortality of the mind through Nirvana?
Gentorev
Posts: 2,931
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12/30/2015 6:12:22 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/30/2015 2:17:18 AM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
Looking through the internet, I found that a popular thought among many individuals is that the Buddha did not believe in God. After reading Jamshed Fozdar's "The God of Buddha," however, I was not convinced of this position. In fact, I am almost certain that Buddha knew and taught of an unknowable God and that His writings were in agreement with much of the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita in Hinduism on various matters (while many instead point to their differences).

I ask for any other insights into the matter of God in Buddhism. What has your research led you to based on Buddhist scripture? Do you think the Buddha did not believe in God? How does Buddhism and Hinduism compare overall?

"The resemblances between the Christian and Buddhist legends are so close that we can scarcely imagine to be a mere coincidence. Jesus and Buddha are both said to have been born of a pure virgin, honoured by heavenly spirits at their birth, prayed to by Kings, and loaded with presents. 'Happy is the whole world,' sing the Gods under the form of young Brahmins at the birth of the child,-----as we are told in the Lalita Vistara, the legendary biography of Buddha, dating from before Christ, 'for he is indeed born who brings salvation and will establish the world in blessedness. He is born who will darken sun and moon by the splendour of his merits and will put all darkness to flight. The blind see, the deaf hear, the demented are restored to reason.'" ----A. Drews, THE CHRIST MYTH, p 104.

"Professor Kellogg points out that in the Chinese books Buddha is said over and over again to have been incarnate of the 'Holy spirit.'"----A, Lillie, Budd in Christendom, p 16.