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Why no aliens? There are none....

brontoraptor
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2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
bulproof
Posts: 25,296
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2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
bulproof
Posts: 25,296
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2/24/2016 2:55:50 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...

Show me the modest rocket ship that is on a 10million year quest
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 2:59:52 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 2:55:50 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...

Show me the modest rocket ship that is on a 10million year quest

These infinite numbers of planets have had billions of years to show a glimpse of existance. Notta. Show me the aliens.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:01:59 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
It would have been easy for Christ to be proven wrong if He were wrong. All it would have taken was a small push by reality against Christ. Notta.

-Fermi paradox

Find an alien civilization and the Biblical account becomes questionable. Yet, no aliens found.

-Kalam Argument

Everything has acause, thus we need a first "uncaused" entity to exist from beyond our reality.

-If no one was beheading Christians, the Bible would be nonverified prophetically.

-If the Gospel was not worldwide, the Bible would be nonverified.

-If Egypt ever rules over another nation, the Bible is wrong, yet since the prophecy was declared, it has never happened.

-If Israel had not become a nation again in 1948, the Bible would be nonverified.

-If the Muslim world had destroyed Israel, the Bible would be wrong. Amongst attempts, threats, and a huge outnumbering of the hated Israel, it has still never happened.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
bulproof
Posts: 25,296
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2/24/2016 3:06:42 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 2:59:52 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:55:50 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...

Show me the modest rocket ship that is on a 10million year quest

These infinite numbers of planets have had billions of years to show a glimpse of existance. Notta. Show me the aliens.

35yrs using modest rocket technology.
You and your Fermi character don't understand rocketry either it seems.
Just add it to you list of things you know nothing about.
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:15:27 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:06:42 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:59:52 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:55:50 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...

Show me the modest rocket ship that is on a 10million year quest

These infinite numbers of planets have had billions of years to show a glimpse of existance. Notta. Show me the aliens.

35yrs using modest rocket technology.
You and your Fermi character don't understand rocketry either it seems.
Just add it to you list of things you know nothing about.

Put theology, religion, and prophecy on your list of things you obviously know nothing about.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
bulproof
Posts: 25,296
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2/24/2016 3:17:56 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:15:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:42 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:59:52 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:55:50 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...

Show me the modest rocket ship that is on a 10million year quest

These infinite numbers of planets have had billions of years to show a glimpse of existance. Notta. Show me the aliens.

35yrs using modest rocket technology.
You and your Fermi character don't understand rocketry either it seems.
Just add it to you list of things you know nothing about.

Put theology, religion, and prophecy on your list of things you obviously know nothing about.

Dillihannity delusion or sumfin...............................hahahahaha
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:18:57 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:17:56 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:15:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:42 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:59:52 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:55:50 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...

Show me the modest rocket ship that is on a 10million year quest

These infinite numbers of planets have had billions of years to show a glimpse of existance. Notta. Show me the aliens.

35yrs using modest rocket technology.
You and your Fermi character don't understand rocketry either it seems.
Just add it to you list of things you know nothing about.

Put theology, religion, and prophecy on your list of things you obviously know nothing about.

Dillihannity delusion or sumfin...............................hahahahaha

The truth hurts eh bull?
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?
bulproof
Posts: 25,296
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2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:18:57 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:56 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:15:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:42 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:59:52 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:55:50 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...

Show me the modest rocket ship that is on a 10million year quest

These infinite numbers of planets have had billions of years to show a glimpse of existance. Notta. Show me the aliens.

35yrs using modest rocket technology.
You and your Fermi character don't understand rocketry either it seems.
Just add it to you list of things you know nothing about.

Put theology, religion, and prophecy on your list of things you obviously know nothing about.

Dillihannity delusion or sumfin...............................hahahahaha

The truth hurts eh bull?
You failed playground at kindy, I see.
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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2/24/2016 3:25:51 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights

Lights for what? Lights are simply used to illuminate dark places. Remember, we cant even see the planet.

Lightning can put out massive amounts of light. Are you saying that we should be able to see lightning in other solar systems?
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:26:57 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:18:57 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:56 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:15:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:42 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:59:52 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:55:50 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:48:47 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:43:12 AM, bulproof wrote:
a modest amount of rocket technology would take them 10 million yrs to find an inhabited planet.

Hundreds of billions of solar systems just in the Milky Way, not to mention other galaxies. Just need one civilization bull. Show me some aliens. According to Atheists it would take a self replicating molecule to get it started. Just one replicating molecule. But...silence...

Show me the modest rocket ship that is on a 10million year quest

These infinite numbers of planets have had billions of years to show a glimpse of existance. Notta. Show me the aliens.

35yrs using modest rocket technology.
You and your Fermi character don't understand rocketry either it seems.
Just add it to you list of things you know nothing about.

Put theology, religion, and prophecy on your list of things you obviously know nothing about.

Dillihannity delusion or sumfin...............................hahahahaha

The truth hurts eh bull?
You failed playground at kindy, I see.

Sticks and stones. Have any thoughts with substance or just drive by posts and dodges?
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:28:17 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:25:51 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights

Lights for what? Lights are simply used to illuminate dark places. Remember, we cant even see the planet.

Lightning can put out massive amounts of light. Are you saying that we should be able to see lightning in other solar systems?

Just a flicker anywhere. I don't ask for much.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
bulproof
Posts: 25,296
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2/24/2016 3:31:59 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights
He's told that the planets can't be seen but he still wants to see a bedroom light on the planet that isn't seen.
It wasn't just playground that you failed at kindy.
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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2/24/2016 3:35:23 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:28:17 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:25:51 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights

Lights for what? Lights are simply used to illuminate dark places. Remember, we cant even see the planet.

Lightning can put out massive amounts of light. Are you saying that we should be able to see lightning in other solar systems?

Just a flicker anywhere. I don't ask for much.

Tell the astronomers around the world that you want to see a flicker on a planet that is too far away to see and see what happens.

This argument falls apart easily with a little picking.
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:36:01 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:31:59 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights
He's told that the planets can't be seen but he still wants to see a bedroom light on the planet that isn't seen.
It wasn't just playground that you failed at kindy.

Find me a space station, spaceship, anything crossing its star. Simple.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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2/24/2016 3:38:38 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
Also, Fermi is assuming that aliens would be imperialistic. Studies have shown a link between intelligence and empathy. http://themindunleashed.org...

Empathy is bad for imperialism.
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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2/24/2016 3:41:25 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:36:01 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:31:59 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights
He's told that the planets can't be seen but he still wants to see a bedroom light on the planet that isn't seen.
It wasn't just playground that you failed at kindy.

Find me a space station, spaceship, anything crossing its star. Simple.

To be clear, we can barely see a whole planet when it crosses in front of a star. We cant even detect their moons. Tell an astronomer that its simple to detect something the size of a building and see what he says.
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:41:31 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:35:23 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:28:17 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:25:51 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights

Lights for what? Lights are simply used to illuminate dark places. Remember, we cant even see the planet.

Lightning can put out massive amounts of light. Are you saying that we should be able to see lightning in other solar systems?

Just a flicker anywhere. I don't ask for much.

Tell the astronomers around the world that you want to see a flicker on a planet that is too far away to see and see what happens.

This argument falls apart easily with a little picking.

Give me a blip, a sound, a flicker, a message, a ship or fleet crosding in front of a star, anything...

Until then, Atheism is dead.

I'll take anything.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
bulproof
Posts: 25,296
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2/24/2016 3:43:00 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:36:01 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:31:59 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights
He's told that the planets can't be seen but he still wants to see a bedroom light on the planet that isn't seen.
It wasn't just playground that you failed at kindy.

Find me a space station, spaceship, anything crossing its star. Simple.
Infinitely smaller than a planet that can't be seen, go you good thing.
hahahaha.
BTW show me one crossing your star.
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:44:40 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:43:00 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:36:01 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:31:59 AM, bulproof wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights
He's told that the planets can't be seen but he still wants to see a bedroom light on the planet that isn't seen.
It wasn't just playground that you failed at kindy.

Find me a space station, spaceship, anything crossing its star. Simple.
Infinitely smaller than a planet that can't be seen, go you good thing.
hahahaha.
BTW show me one crossing your star.

There isn't one to show because none exist. But hold onto your faith that yields no rewards.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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2/24/2016 3:46:43 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:41:31 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:35:23 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:28:17 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:25:51 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights

Lights for what? Lights are simply used to illuminate dark places. Remember, we cant even see the planet.

Lightning can put out massive amounts of light. Are you saying that we should be able to see lightning in other solar systems?

Just a flicker anywhere. I don't ask for much.

Tell the astronomers around the world that you want to see a flicker on a planet that is too far away to see and see what happens.

This argument falls apart easily with a little picking.

Give me a blip, a sound, a flicker, a message, a ship or fleet crosding in front of a star, anything...

Until then, Atheism is dead.

I'll take anything.

So your reasoning goes like this:

Our inability to see anything less than a planet in another solar system = proof there is god

Would you expect to convert someone to theism with that argument? I acknowledge that a non-interventionist "god" may exist but that is a terrible argument.
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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2/24/2016 3:51:09 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:46:43 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:41:31 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:35:23 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:28:17 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:25:51 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights

Lights for what? Lights are simply used to illuminate dark places. Remember, we cant even see the planet.

Lightning can put out massive amounts of light. Are you saying that we should be able to see lightning in other solar systems?

Just a flicker anywhere. I don't ask for much.

Tell the astronomers around the world that you want to see a flicker on a planet that is too far away to see and see what happens.

This argument falls apart easily with a little picking.

Give me a blip, a sound, a flicker, a message, a ship or fleet crosding in front of a star, anything...

Until then, Atheism is dead.

I'll take anything.

So your reasoning goes like this:

Our inability to see anything less than a planet in another solar system = proof there is god

Would you expect to convert someone to theism with that argument? I acknowledge that a non-interventionist "god" may exist but that is a terrible argument.

We can see other galaxies nice and beautifully.
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matt8800
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2/24/2016 3:51:55 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
BTW, the existence of aliens wouldn't disprove there was a non-interventionist god - it would just disprove the religions which claim special revelation.

How do you know the bible is true? Because it says so. Can you imagine a world where that was our standards to determine truth? The only proof every author would need is just to say his words are true.
matt8800
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2/24/2016 3:57:06 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 2/24/2016 3:51:09 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:46:43 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:41:31 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:35:23 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:28:17 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:25:51 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:21:43 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:20:42 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:17:40 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 2/24/2016 3:06:48 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 2/24/2016 2:32:27 AM, brontoraptor wrote:
Could we be alone in our part of the galaxy, or more dramatic still, could we be the only technological society in the universe?"

Our Galaxy Should Be Teeming With Civilizations, But Where Are They?

Is there obvious proof that we could be alone in the Galaxy? Enrico Fermi thought so -- and he was a pretty smart guy. Might he have been right?

It's been a hundred years since Fermi, an icon of physics, was born (and nearly a half-century since he died). He's best remembered for building a working atomic reactor in a squash court. But in 1950, Fermi made a seemingly innocuous lunchtime remark that has caught and held the attention of every SETI researcher since. (How many luncheon quips have you made with similar consequence?)

The remark came while Fermi was discussing with his mealtime mates the possibility that many sophisticated societies populate the Galaxy. They thought it reasonable to assume that we have a lot of cosmic company. But somewhere between one sentence and the next, Fermi's supple brain realized that if this was true, it implied something profound. If there are really a lot of alien societies, then some of them might have spread out.

Fermi realized that any civilization with a modest amount of rocket technology and an immodest amount of imperial incentive could rapidly colonize the entire Galaxy. Within ten million years, every star system could be brought under the wing of empire. Ten million years may sound long, but in fact it's quite short compared with the age of the Galaxy, which is roughly ten thousand million years. Colonization of the Milky Way should be a quick exercise.

So what Fermi immediately realized was that the aliens have had more than enough time to pepper the Galaxy with their presence. But looking around, he didn't see any clear indication that they're out and about. This prompted Fermi to ask what was (to him) an obvious question: "where is everybody?"

www.seti.org/seti-institute/project/details/fermi-paradox

If there are aliens, then we would be aliens to them. Since we have modest rocket power, why haven't we colonized other planets?

Another question: What makes you so sure aliens haven't colonized other planets than the ones they originated from?

It would take nothing but a basic intelligent lifeform for us to spot evidence of one of them across zillions of observable solar systems.

What is your reasoning for that? We cant even see a whole planet in other solar systems. We can only see their shadow if they happen to pass in front of their star. What do you think we would "spot" if they were there?

Let there be...

Lights

Lights for what? Lights are simply used to illuminate dark places. Remember, we cant even see the planet.

Lightning can put out massive amounts of light. Are you saying that we should be able to see lightning in other solar systems?

Just a flicker anywhere. I don't ask for much.

Tell the astronomers around the world that you want to see a flicker on a planet that is too far away to see and see what happens.

This argument falls apart easily with a little picking.

Give me a blip, a sound, a flicker, a message, a ship or fleet crosding in front of a star, anything...

Until then, Atheism is dead.

I'll take anything.

So your reasoning goes like this:

Our inability to see anything less than a planet in another solar system = proof there is god

Would you expect to convert someone to theism with that argument? I acknowledge that a non-interventionist "god" may exist but that is a terrible argument.

We can see other galaxies nice and beautifully.

Do you think the light emitted from earth is as bright as a galaxy?