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The Fundamentalist Internalizes Religion

s-anthony
Posts: 2,582
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3/27/2016 1:16:49 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
The fundamentalist sees not, only, the spirit of God in the collective but, also, in oneself. The symbols and motifs of religion are not only actual in spirit but also materialistically. The fundamentalist believes the actual phenomena of one's religion play themselves out in the heart of the believer. For instance, in identification with Christ, the Christian fundamentalist believes one has crucified the flesh or has sacrificed bodily desires for the demands of the spirit. Religion or spirituality is not merely external to the fundamentalist; it is identification with the religion which verifies membership. It's not enough to say the fundamentalist belongs to the religion; the fundamentalist is the religion. The individual is one with the collective, both in body and in spirit; and, the archetypes and motifs of the religion play themselves out in the life of the fundamentalist.

The fundamentalist has the authority of God, having objective and absolute truth. As the fundamentalist disobeys God, it is not one's own fault; but, the individual has fallen prey to the wiles of the Devil. Not only does the fundamentalist remain innocent but also has been victimized. He, or she, has been persecuted by the Devil. The only fault to which the fundamentalist lays claim is not being strong enough to resist temptation. The fundamentalist may find oneself guilty in this, or the individual may believe he, or she, was unduly tried. If the trials become overwhelming, either in strength or in abundance, the individual begins to resent God, believing like a sensitive child, one has been ill-treated. With time, the individual's heart begins to grow cold. In the former case, the trial is light; and, the individual is not to blame for the sin, itself, but, merely, for a moment of weakness. In the latter case, the trial is unbearable; and, the individual is being mistreated. In the mind of the fundamentalist, the individual does not take ownership for one's own actions. The sin is either born by God (the collective) or it's a product of the Devil (the world). Either way, the sin is repressed and projected onto one's culture or society. The fundamentalist is an innocent victim. In this way, the Christian fundamentalist truly identifies with Christ. The individual believes, with baptism, he, or she, has gone from being a child of the world, the old self has been crucified, to being a child of God, the new self has been resurrected. The dying-and-rising god motif is not only found in one's religion but in the psychic life of the individual. It is the ability to internalize the savior archetype and the dying-and-rising god motif that makes religion real and personal to the fundamentalist.

The excitement and religious fervor, that which the fundamentalist calls spirituality, comes not from the externalization of religion but, only, as religion is internalized. It is not enough for the believer to believe in the religion, but the believer must believe he, or she, is the culmination, or the fulfillment of the religion.
RedAtheist912
Posts: 89
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3/27/2016 1:32:53 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/27/2016 1:16:49 PM, s-anthony wrote:
The fundamentalist sees not, only, the spirit of God in the collective but, also, in oneself. The symbols and motifs of religion are not only actual in spirit but also materialistically. The fundamentalist believes the actual phenomena of one's religion play themselves out in the heart of the believer. For instance, in identification with Christ, the Christian fundamentalist believes one has crucified the flesh or has sacrificed bodily desires for the demands of the spirit. Religion or spirituality is not merely external to the fundamentalist; it is identification with the religion which verifies membership. It's not enough to say the fundamentalist belongs to the religion; the fundamentalist is the religion. The individual is one with the collective, both in body and in spirit; and, the archetypes and motifs of the religion play themselves out in the life of the fundamentalist.

The fundamentalist has the authority of God, having objective and absolute truth. As the fundamentalist disobeys God, it is not one's own fault; but, the individual has fallen prey to the wiles of the Devil. Not only does the fundamentalist remain innocent but also has been victimized. He, or she, has been persecuted by the Devil. The only fault to which the fundamentalist lays claim is not being strong enough to resist temptation. The fundamentalist may find oneself guilty in this, or the individual may believe he, or she, was unduly tried. If the trials become overwhelming, either in strength or in abundance, the individual begins to resent God, believing like a sensitive child, one has been ill-treated. With time, the individual's heart begins to grow cold. In the former case, the trial is light; and, the individual is not to blame for the sin, itself, but, merely, for a moment of weakness. In the latter case, the trial is unbearable; and, the individual is being mistreated. In the mind of the fundamentalist, the individual does not take ownership for one's own actions. The sin is either born by God (the collective) or it's a product of the Devil (the world). Either way, the sin is repressed and projected onto one's culture or society. The fundamentalist is an innocent victim. In this way, the Christian fundamentalist truly identifies with Christ. The individual believes, with baptism, he, or she, has gone from being a child of the world, the old self has been crucified, to being a child of God, the new self has been resurrected. The dying-and-rising god motif is not only found in one's religion but in the psychic life of the individual. It is the ability to internalize the savior archetype and the dying-and-rising god motif that makes religion real and personal to the fundamentalist.

The excitement and religious fervor, that which the fundamentalist calls spirituality, comes not from the externalization of religion but, only, as religion is internalized. It is not enough for the believer to believe in the religion, but the believer must believe he, or she, is the culmination, or the fulfillment of the religion.

It raises a good question. In that way a fundamentalist could just "resist to temptation" anything from murder to rape to drug dealing, and not feel responsible for any of it. But hey, even if you receive a death sentence, it's the devil's fault and by salvation you have eternal happiness waiting for you! Well, that is quite a danger religion poses to anybody, able to turn perfectly sane and moral people to...that.
s-anthony
Posts: 2,582
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3/27/2016 4:26:56 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
It raises a good question. In that way a fundamentalist could just "resist to temptation" anything from murder to rape to drug dealing, and not feel responsible for any of it. But hey, even if you receive a death sentence, it's the devil's fault and by salvation you have eternal happiness waiting for you! Well, that is quite a danger religion poses to anybody, able to turn perfectly sane and moral people to...that.

This is not only true of the fundamentalist but the human psyche, as well. Through the act of repression, the conscious mind is attempting to dissociate itself from unpleasant thoughts about itself; it's attempting through the process of repression-and-projection to externalize our iniquities, to make them a product of the world and not our selves.

The hypocrisy in this is the belief we, ourselves, do not also do this.

The difference between the fundamentalist and any other is the fundamentalist has concretized the archetypes and motifs and the other has not.
Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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3/28/2016 9:34:35 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/28/2016 2:28:25 PM, s-anthony wrote:
At 3/28/2016 5:37:44 AM, Axonly wrote:
Im surprised no one replied to this!

I'm not.

XD fair enough
Meh!
s-anthony
Posts: 2,582
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3/28/2016 10:19:52 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/28/2016 9:34:35 PM, Axonly wrote:
At 3/28/2016 2:28:25 PM, s-anthony wrote:
At 3/28/2016 5:37:44 AM, Axonly wrote:
Im surprised no one replied to this!

I'm not.

XD fair enough

I think the reason my posts do not appeal to very many people is because people like absolutes; for the most part, they have strong ideological bents. Contradiction, oppositions, and disagreements make them feel alive; they set them apart in different camps and give them reasons to fight. Seeing the truth, in different points of view, is not very exciting.