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Rami
Posts: 431
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3/29/2016 6:16:24 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
I've always dreamt of abusing the DDO forums. Since the topics seemingly could not get worse, I post this so at least my Jewish colleagues on DDO could benefit. Should there be any Jews on this site, I welcome you to join us in this project.

Here, we are trying to explain our idea, and look for potential writers and subscribers. More on that later.

Organization:
The drafting of the Dvar Torah will be in the religion forum (ignore all the haters who don't like what we're doing with the forums). After we feel that it's good, it will be sent through a message to all receivers. It will be a link to of the "Finished Product".

Writers and Receivers Sign-up:
To have a Dvar Torah, we're going to need to have writers (also receivers, but less of an issue). In this forum, we are looking for applicants. It may be awhile before we accept writers, but we can only start deciding once we know who's interested.
Writers:
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Subcribers:
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Forum:
The Dvar Torah will be built In a forum topic titled "Weekly Dvar Torah Draft: [insert current Parshah here]. Here, ideas will be written, edited, and improved. Only approved writers can post. Any Torah idea is acceptable, although relating it to the current Parshah is encouraged. The writing should start on Sunday, and end on Thursday night. We need to finish it early Friday because of time zone issues.

Finished Product:
After the Dvar Torah is declared finished, it will be copy & pasted onto a doc, which is the link we are sending out through PM to subcribers.
Yavneh
Posts: 54
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3/29/2016 7:32:00 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
I would love to write.
"Imagine a person who comes in here tonight and argues "air isn't true" but continues to breathe it while he argues. In their daily lives, Atheists continue to breathe-- they take medicine, fly on planes, watch TV, use computers and the Internet for communication and countless tasks, electrical lights when it's dark... all these are made possible by G-d's creations, and would not be possible via the Atheist worldview. They are breathing G-d's air all the time they argue against Him." -- Fly/Me
Yavneh
Posts: 54
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3/30/2016 12:40:06 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
Bs"D

This week"s Torah portion is Parshat Shemini, Leviticus 9:1 to 11:47. The portion begins at the end of the Yemei HaMiluim, the days of priestly training, for Aaron and his sons. After a week of practice, Moses commands Aaron that, to bring the Divine Presence into the people"s "sight" (ie. perception), he must perform a set of personal and communal sacrifices. Aaron duly performs the service, and, along with Moses, he blesses the people. Immediately, a fire comes down from above and devours the sacrifice, before all the people.

It is at this exact moment, a moment of such triumph for the Jewish people, that tragedy strikes. Nadav and Avihu, the two elder sons of Aaron, take a firepan each and bring a 'strange fire', unauthorized by G-d. In the same fashion that a heavenly fire descended upon the offerings, a heavenly fire descends upon Nadav and Avihu and consumes them.

What is the identity of this 'strange fire'? The intuitive answer, that the offering was faulty or illicit, does not fit with the beginning of the verse, which states that the pair brought incense-- a sanctioned sacrifice-- before G-d. Given this, what is the problem?

Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki, an 11th century French Rabbi universally regarded as the greatest of the Torah commentators, brings down the debate recorded in Vayikra Rabba (late antiquity): Rabbi Elazar states that their sin was disrespect, as they issuing halachic (legal) rulings in front of Moses and Aaron, while Rabbi Yishmael contends that they were intoxicated while offering their sacrifice.

Common to both opinions is the idea that the fault is on the person, rather than the object-- in talmudic terms, the gavra rather than the cheftza. Even a perfect, unflawed sacrifice can be repulsive to G-d, if the offerer is repulsive. The fire is not intrinsically "strange", or more accurately (translation-wise) "foreign", but rather it is the attitude of Nadav and Avihu, the disrespect and disregard for others" honor, that disqualifies their sacrifice.

In this vein, the Mishnah, in Menachot 13:11, states: "It is the same whether one offers much or little, so long as he directs his heart to heaven." The object is less important than it"s giver; in essence, it is the thought that counts.

--This just needs a conclusion.
"Imagine a person who comes in here tonight and argues "air isn't true" but continues to breathe it while he argues. In their daily lives, Atheists continue to breathe-- they take medicine, fly on planes, watch TV, use computers and the Internet for communication and countless tasks, electrical lights when it's dark... all these are made possible by G-d's creations, and would not be possible via the Atheist worldview. They are breathing G-d's air all the time they argue against Him." -- Fly/Me