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Confirmation Bias

s-anthony
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4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.
DPMartin
Posts: 1,096
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4/1/2016 6:49:42 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

And? People are different in some ways and the same in some ways. You didn't just discover this did you?
s-anthony
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4/1/2016 7:12:57 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 6:49:42 PM, DPMartin wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

And? People are different in some ways and the same in some ways. You didn't just discover this did you?

If all you got from this is people are agreeable and disagreeable, then, I think you've missed the point of the OP.
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
DPMartin
Posts: 1,096
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4/1/2016 9:10:00 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101

I know, the guy's trying to lift up nothing, as wonderful. where I come from it's called con artist, shuck and jive. you know dreamy wonderfulness. And a couple of dubies to make it sound good.
Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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4/1/2016 9:25:34 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101

If you think that confirmation bias doesn't apply to you, then that's due to another type of bias "Bias blind spot"
Meh!
brontoraptor
Posts: 11,685
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4/1/2016 9:46:26 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 9:25:34 PM, Axonly wrote:
At 4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101

If you think that confirmation bias doesn't apply to you, then that's due to another type of bias "Bias blind spot"

I was born into a faith, became atheist, and then turned Christian. I use the term "confirmation bias" in my debates often and plenty. I've seen it all, heard it all, and examined my own over time. In the end, Atheism is illogical and not even feasable within the constructs of our reality. And Christianity offers so much that Atheism has no answer for. Atheism offers nothing but no good, no evil, and pitiless indifference. Naaaaa....I'm good. Been there, done that. I peaced out.
"What Donald Trump is doing is representing the absolute heartbreak, and anger, and frustration at a government gone mad."

http://youtu.be...
Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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4/1/2016 10:22:29 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 9:46:26 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 9:25:34 PM, Axonly wrote:
At 4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101

If you think that confirmation bias doesn't apply to you, then that's due to another type of bias "Bias blind spot"

I was born into a faith, became atheist, and then turned Christian. I use the term "confirmation bias" in my debates often and plenty. I've seen it all, heard it all, and examined my own over time. In the end, Atheism is illogical and not even feasable within the constructs of our reality. And Christianity offers so much that Atheism has no answer for. Atheism offers nothing but no good, no evil, and pitiless indifference. Naaaaa....I'm good. Been there, done that. I peaced out.

You're still doing it xD Everyone is
Meh!
s-anthony
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4/2/2016 12:17:26 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101

In the OP, give me an instance in which I said anything about atheism, specifically.
s-anthony
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4/2/2016 12:31:03 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 9:10:00 PM, DPMartin wrote:
At 4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101

I know, the guy's trying to lift up nothing, as wonderful. where I come from it's called con artist, shuck and jive. you know dreamy wonderfulness. And a couple of dubies to make it sound good.

Thanks for the example of confirmation bias. Just because you don't agree with something someone is trying to say, the person is automatically accused of saying nothing, labeled a con artist, and doing drugs.
RedAtheist912
Posts: 89
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4/2/2016 12:34:28 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 9:46:26 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 9:25:34 PM, Axonly wrote:
At 4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101

If you think that confirmation bias doesn't apply to you, then that's due to another type of bias "Bias blind spot"

I was born into a faith, became atheist, and then turned Christian. I use the term "confirmation bias" in my debates often and plenty. I've seen it all, heard it all, and examined my own over time. In the end, Atheism is illogical and not even feasable within the constructs of our reality. And Christianity offers so much that Atheism has no answer for. Atheism offers nothing but no good, no evil, and pitiless indifference. Naaaaa....I'm good. Been there, done that. I peaced out.

Wow, you tried atheism? Cool! How did you make the decision and how was the experience?
s-anthony
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4/2/2016 1:08:37 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
I've seen it all, heard it all, and examined my own over time.

You've seen it all? You've heard it all? If you really believe that, then, your bias is so strong, you're not even aware you have one.

I don't know anyone who has seen it all and heard it all. Congratulations! You're the first person I've ever met that knows everything. How does it feel to know everything and have absolutely nothing else to learn?

In the end, Atheism is illogical and not even feasable within the constructs of our reality.

In the end? It's apparent you've reached a conclusion not, only, for yourself but everyone else.

It may be illogical within the constructs of your reality, but apparently, it's not for atheists or they wouldn't find it reasonable.
bulproof
Posts: 25,267
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4/2/2016 3:47:47 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 8:13:27 PM, brontoraptor wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Atheism 101

hahahahahaha
What a wanker.
Religion is just mind control. George Carlin
bulproof
Posts: 25,267
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4/2/2016 3:50:21 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.
Well said.
I dips me lid.
Religion is just mind control. George Carlin
Emmarie
Posts: 1,907
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4/2/2016 3:59:34 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

Wow - I just read all the responses on this post thus far. I would have never expected a post like this to draw so much negativity.

I agree with your post and usually find myself to be more of the individualist. I just really have a hard time accepting any belief because a large group does. I also dislike that once you accept one belief - you are expected to agree verbatim on everything and conform to a group standard just for agreeing on the main idea of the Christian religion.

The only thing that bothered me slightly about your post is that you won't specific about what religion you were referring to - if a religion at all. So I specified what religion I was referring to. If you deliberately didn't specify - I can understand why-lol.
s-anthony
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4/2/2016 5:17:31 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/2/2016 3:50:21 PM, bulproof wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.
Well said.
I dips me lid.

Thanks.
s-anthony
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4/2/2016 5:35:41 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
Wow - I just read all the responses on this post thus far. I would have never expected a post like this to draw so much negativity.

I'm sorry to say, but I thought it would attract more criticism than it did.

The only thing that bothered me slightly about your post is that you won't specific about what religion you were referring to - if a religion at all. So I specified what religion I was referring to. If you deliberately didn't specify - I can understand why-lol.

Any religion that requires belief. Beyond that, for me, it's immaterial.
Overhead
Posts: 106
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4/2/2016 6:58:05 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
This is why in science having a sound methodology, preferably double blind, is important and why sources which rely on such methods carry greater weight than those that do not.
s-anthony
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4/2/2016 7:08:03 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
This is why in science having a sound methodology, preferably double blind, is important and why sources which rely on such methods carry greater weight than those that do not.

A methodology, itself, can be bias; it can be blind to anomalies.

That which is accurate carries the greatest weight, no matter its degree of probability.
Overhead
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4/2/2016 7:15:53 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/2/2016 7:08:03 PM, s-anthony wrote:
This is why in science having a sound methodology, preferably double blind, is important and why sources which rely on such methods carry greater weight than those that do not.

A methodology, itself, can be bias; it can be blind to anomalies.

That which is accurate carries the greatest weight, no matter its degree of probability.

I thought we were talking about confirmation bias, not bias in general.

The issue with confirmation bias is how subtle and hard to correct and account for it can be. That's not the case with methodologies where they must be explicitly laid out and peer reviewed to check for such errors.

Even if studies slip through, the fact that methodologies must be published and are therefore available to criticism from the entire academic community ensures that they can be found and taken into account.

Once again, the scientific method is the best way of dealing with bias.
s-anthony
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4/2/2016 8:06:10 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
I thought we were talking about confirmation bias, not bias in general.

Methodologies can be used to confirm bias.

The issue with confirmation bias is how subtle and hard to correct and account for it can be. That's not the case with methodologies where they must be explicitly laid out and peer reviewed to check for such errors.

Methodologies are devised by fallible human beings. Results are interpreted by bias individuals. Anyone who puts unquestionable faith in any device or collective, whether expert or not, is prone to error.

Even if studies slip through, the fact that methodologies must be published and are therefore available to criticism from the entire academic community ensures that they can be found and taken into account.

Peer review does not guarantee against error. All collectives, whether scientific or otherwise, are prone to bias.

Once again, the scientific method is the best way of dealing with bias.

The only difference between the scientist and the religionist: the scientist puts one's faith in high degrees of probability, and the religionist puts one's faith in deviations from that which is natural. There is no guarantee that either of them is right.
Outplayz
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4/3/2016 12:04:43 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

I think this bias is alright. If one is looking for things that fit their faith or belief... then, the bias is okay as long as they understand some things are just normal predictable occurrences.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

I am not to sure if you are going in the direction i am getting from this, but i get it and agree. There definitely is both the predictable and unpredictable. When it comes to conformation bias, as someone spiritual, i must pay close attention to how i define what is spiritual and what is not. However, i think i fall under the determinative category and believe that is the best way.

For a person to be indeterminative, they are adding something to the world that is poison. They don't think about confirmation bias basically. That is why i always ask a theist if they have read their holy book to know what direction to take the conversation. Yet... i am aware of this. The ones that just debate or argue with a person that is indeterminative; a blind follower, usually put this type a person defense mode... however, defense mode is making up more myth to somehow back up a belief that they don't really even understand. This just creates more chaos and myth... maybe the reason we have so many religions.

The way i believe is mine. I have created it, i have made sense of it, i have reasoned and argued with myself, i have applied the best logic i can to make my belief. There has been experiences in my life that add to the construction of my belief. I rate them from weak to strong. The strong, well, they are just out there and i can't make sense of them with any evidence or knowledge we have at this point. But, the weak ones are susceptible to confirmation bias. Like thinking of rain, and it rains. But... even in this logic i have had strong experiences that don't fall under CB. Such as thinking of a person i never think about and finding out they died the next day. Or, thinking of a group of friends i had lost contact with for over 5 years, and they call and we are back together... even more interesting, this happened exactly when i had a falling out with the people i was friends with. I have had the other ones as well... but, they happen a lot. Such as thinking of a person, hearing lyrics in a song, having a thought to drive how off the freeway this time (avoiding a check point - this is a drunk story lol)... and so on.

Confirmation bias is an interesting idea to me. It happens, but at what point (as someone spiritual) can i disagree with the experience... other than the normal, "my moms going to call me" and she does... clearly a frequency thing and a perfect definition/example of C.B. However, i personally believe everyone has a path that they control. I also believe there are signs and thoughts that can guide them to their path and purpose. I guess i am trying to say, i find spirituality in psychology of Confirmation bias.
Overhead
Posts: 106
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4/3/2016 1:40:13 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/2/2016 8:06:10 PM, s-anthony wrote:
I thought we were talking about confirmation bias, not bias in general.

Methodologies can be used to confirm bias.

No, it can't in the sense we're talking about.

The issue with confirmation bias is how subtle and hard to correct and account for it can be. That's not the case with methodologies where they must be explicitly laid out and peer reviewed to check for such errors.

Methodologies are devised by fallible human beings. Results are interpreted by bias individuals. Anyone who puts unquestionable faith in any device or collective, whether expert or not, is prone to error.


Any random type of bias =/= confirmation bias

Also it isn't unquestionable faith. That's the entire point of peer review and the like, to check for such errors because they are possible. It's a method which recognises errors and bias can occur and has developed a systematic method to look fot them, root them out and minimise their effect.

Even if studies slip through, the fact that methodologies must be published and are therefore available to criticism from the entire academic community ensures that they can be found and taken into account.

Peer review does not guarantee against error. All collectives, whether scientific or otherwise, are prone to bias.

There is no one scientific collective and I specifically said above it "minimises their effect". It doesn't need to guarantee against error completely and totally with 100%, which is impossible and not needed to fulfil my claims. It just needs to be the best method, which it is.

Once again, the scientific method is the best way of dealing with bias.

The only difference between the scientist and the religionist: the scientist puts one's faith in high degrees of probability, and the religionist puts one's faith in deviations from that which is natural. There is no guarantee that either of them is right.

Science is evidence based, religion is faith based - fo instance faith is what is presumed to be "natural".
s-anthony
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4/3/2016 4:47:21 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

I think this bias is alright. If one is looking for things that fit their faith or belief... then, the bias is okay as long as they understand some things are just normal predictable occurrences.

Looking for things which fit your beliefs is the very meaning of confirmation bias.

If the bias is based on normal predictable occurrences, then, it's based on that which is reasonable. However, I think it's important for us to realize just because something is reasonable doesn't mean it's not bias.

I am not to sure if you are going in the direction i am getting from this, but i get it and agree. There definitely is both the predictable and unpredictable. When it comes to conformation bias, as someone spiritual, i must pay close attention to how i define what is spiritual and what is not. However, i think i fall under the determinative category and believe that is the best way.

There's nothing wrong with believing something is best. I believe, essentially, we all do it. If we weren't able to evaluate things, it would be impossible to come to a decision on anything. Yet, I think it's very important we realize this is the very meaning of being bias.
MadCornishBiker
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4/3/2016 12:12:52 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

No, we aren't all guilty of it.

We are however all in danger of being guilty of it if we are not careful, since it is very much a human tendency.

It is too easy to see what we think will prove our point, but is it wise?

Confirmation bias can come in for a number of reasons, not the least by who we respect and why, which results in something like the "my country right or wrong" bias. Just because our chosen experts say something doesn't make t right.

How much do you value truth?

The more you value truth, the less susceptible you will allow yourself to be to confirmation bias, because bias towards truth is the only one we should allow ourselves the luxury of.
skipsaweirdo
Posts: 1,870
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4/3/2016 2:05:36 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/2/2016 3:59:34 PM, Emmarie wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.


Wow - I just read all the responses on this post thus far. I would have never expected a post like this to draw so much negativity.

I agree with your post and usually find myself to be more of the individualist. I just really have a hard time accepting any belief because a large group does.
The idea that not accepting a belief just because a large group does is a belief held by a large group. They believe that believing based solely on the observation they think the large group formed beliefs just because they want to go along with a large group is an unacceptable reason. So you're just a hypocrite if you think what you said shows individualism.
I also dislike that once you accept one belief - you are expected to agree verbatim on everything and conform to a group standard just for agreeing on the main idea of the Christian religion.
This is nothing but what a large group of people believe happens or must happen if you accept part of Christianity. Again a belief that a large group has. Lol
The only thing that bothered me slightly about your post is that you won't specific about what religion you were referring to - if a religion at all. So I specified what religion I was referring to. If you deliberately didn't specify - I can understand why-lol.
MadCornishBiker
Posts: 23,302
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4/3/2016 2:27:28 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/2/2016 3:59:34 PM, Emmarie wrote:
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.


Wow - I just read all the responses on this post thus far. I would have never expected a post like this to draw so much negativity.

I agree with your post and usually find myself to be more of the individualist. I just really have a hard time accepting any belief because a large group does. I also dislike that once you accept one belief - you are expected to agree verbatim on everything and conform to a group standard just for agreeing on the main idea of the Christian religion.

The only thing that bothered me slightly about your post is that you won't specific about what religion you were referring to - if a religion at all. So I specified what religion I was referring to. If you deliberately didn't specify - I can understand why-lol.

The problem you are up against is that there can only be one truth, that is an absolute.

Since there is only one truth then only one religion, if any, and I include Atheism in this, can possibly be right.

In fact I should qualify that down ever further. Only one set of beliefs can be even remotely close to the truth, Again, if any.

The simple truth is that if two faiths disagree on any one point then one or both of them are wrong.
Emmarie
Posts: 1,907
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4/3/2016 7:30:32 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/3/2016 2:27:28 PM, MadCornishBiker wrote:
At 4/2/2016 3:59:34 PM, Emmarie wrote:


Wow - I just read all the responses on this post thus far. I would have never expected a post like this to draw so much negativity.

I agree with your post and usually find myself to be more of the individualist. I just really have a hard time accepting any belief because a large group does. I also dislike that once you accept one belief - you are expected to agree verbatim on everything and conform to a group standard just for agreeing on the main idea of the Christian religion.

The only thing that bothered me slightly about your post is that you won't specific about what religion you were referring to - if a religion at all. So I specified what religion I was referring to. If you deliberately didn't specify - I can understand why-lol.

The problem you are up against is that there can only be one truth, that is an absolute.

Since there is only one truth then only one religion, if any, and I include Atheism in this, can possibly be right.

In fact I should qualify that down ever further. Only one set of beliefs can be even remotely close to the truth, Again, if any.

The simple truth is that if two faiths disagree on any one point then one or both of them are wrong.

There is only one truth - love God (The Father of Creation) with all thy heart and love thy neighbor as thyself. It's an equation and every individual is capable of fulfilling it thru individual means. God doesn't require verbatim beliefs - he requires our hearts to be sincere in service.

Luke 10:27 And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself.

28 And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.

29 But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbour?

30 And Jesus answering said, A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead.

31 And by chance there came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side.

32 And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side.

33 But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him,

34 And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.

35 And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spends more, when I come again, I will repay thee.

36 Which now of these three, thinks thou, was neighbour unto him that fell among the thieves?

37 And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.

If Christ required verbatim belief - he wouldn't have told this parable because the Israelite despised the Samaritans and their worship style.
Harikrish
Posts: 11,010
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4/3/2016 7:33:48 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/1/2016 5:53:50 PM, s-anthony wrote:
Confirmation bias is the verification of one perspective over others.

It is something of which we are all guilty.

However, our guilt is, also, our conscious identities. Without the ability to select one possibility over all others, determination could never be made about anything. It is our capacity to validate our beliefs that allows us to have beliefs in the first place.

However, I believe there is a spectrum bounded by two extremes, absolute indetermination and absolute determination. There are those who have tendencies to be relatively indeterminate in their beliefs. Instead of making decisions for themselves, they are defined by their collectives. They see no stark difference between themselves and the group. However, the difference arises as they contrast themselves with things which are not normal. They look for normalcy in a very diverse world. Anything that threatens their sense of normalcy, threatens their sense of rationality. However, to the other extreme, there are those who are very strong-willed; they are very determinant and pride themselves in being autonomous; they seek independence from the group; they revel in the fact they are unique. These people are not looking for normalcies; they believe the world has its fill; they are not looking for predictabilities and reproducibility; they are looking for deviations, outliers, and things which are phenomenal. The world is too predictable; it is not very exciting.

Both extremes cause bias. The world is neither indeterminate nor determinate, but both. The world has unpredictabilities and predictabilities; it has things which are unable to be reproduced and things which are; it is unreliable and reliable; it is unnatural and natural; it has irregularity and regularity; it is illogical and logical; it is sacred and it is common.

What you are alluding to is a phenomena that is better addressed in the philosophical view of Solipsism or theory of mind. The problem of the one, the many and other minds.
Since one can only be sure of ones own experience and knowledge gained from ones experiences, it raises the problem of other minds that you cannot know and yet they too exist. It gets more complicated when dealing with metaphysical experiences which are not subject to empirical validation. Therefore confirmation bias can be expected on a religious forum when subjectivity is the only experience which is the problem of the many here.
Solipsism: The problem of the one, the many and other minds.
Emmarie
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4/3/2016 7:35:27 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/3/2016 2:05:36 PM, skipsaweirdo wrote:
At 4/2/2016 3:59:34 PM, Emmarie wrote:


Wow - I just read all the responses on this post thus far. I would have never expected a post like this to draw so much negativity.

I agree with your post and usually find myself to be more of the individualist. I just really have a hard time accepting any belief because a large group does.
The idea that not accepting a belief just because a large group does is a belief held by a large group. They believe that believing based solely on the observation they think the large group formed beliefs just because they want to go along with a large group is an unacceptable reason. So you're just a hypocrite if you think what you said shows individualism.
I also dislike that once you accept one belief - you are expected to agree verbatim on everything and conform to a group standard just for agreeing on the main idea of the Christian religion.
This is nothing but what a large group of people believe happens or must happen if you accept part of Christianity. Again a belief that a large group has. Lol
No there are Christians - like me who are not part of organized religion - nor do I pretend to be God and judge anyone for their belief - or lack of belief - that's God's realm - not mine. I only read the 4 Gospels and serve God by following Christ's teachings. My "religion" is more about how I live than trying to make people believe the same as I do.
The only thing that bothered me slightly about your post is that you won't specific about what religion you were referring to - if a religion at all. So I specified what religion I was referring to. If you deliberately didn't specify - I can understand why-lol.