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Rene Salm Myth of Nazareth criticisms?

SNP1
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4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?
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Geogeer
Posts: 4,297
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4/7/2016 10:56:44 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?

Not quite what you were looking for, but saw this a while ago...

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org...

Hope it helps...
SNP1
Posts: 2,407
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4/7/2016 11:03:56 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 10:56:44 PM, Geogeer wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?

Not quite what you were looking for, but saw this a while ago...

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org...

Hope it helps...

I will take a look at it, but I do recommend (at minimum) this paper.
http://www.nazarethmyth.info...

If it was just Rene Salm that was positing this idea, I would probably be more agnostic about it. The thing is, there are some PhD historians who actually agree with him (Robert M Price just to name one), and so I find it hard to simply dismiss what he says.

Most criticisms about him are either attacks about credentials or based on claims that are not actually published through academia.
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Geogeer
Posts: 4,297
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4/7/2016 11:16:21 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 11:03:56 PM, SNP1 wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:56:44 PM, Geogeer wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?

Not quite what you were looking for, but saw this a while ago...

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org...

Hope it helps...

I will take a look at it, but I do recommend (at minimum) this paper.
http://www.nazarethmyth.info...

If it was just Rene Salm that was positing this idea, I would probably be more agnostic about it. The thing is, there are some PhD historians who actually agree with him (Robert M Price just to name one), and so I find it hard to simply dismiss what he says.

Most criticisms about him are either attacks about credentials or based on claims that are not actually published through academia.

Will do (once I'm done with my current debate). These things are always tough, because if the premise is that Nazareth was settled after the fall of Jerusalem, then the question is did they settle empty land, or did they settle what was perhaps a small hamlet? I was helping out a friend of my who was taking humanities and he was asking an engineering question about river (more geology than engineering) moving because a town had relocated several miles away in a period of less than 50 years.

I do want an archeologist to answer me one question one of these days... How the heck do cities get buried? I drive down the highway and see a hundred year old farm shack. It may be dilapidated, but it hasn't been covered over with dirt. Yet a city like Jerusalem which has been constantly occupied is finding ruins of Roman structure buried. How does that happen?!?
SNP1
Posts: 2,407
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4/7/2016 11:27:49 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 11:16:21 PM, Geogeer wrote:
At 4/7/2016 11:03:56 PM, SNP1 wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:56:44 PM, Geogeer wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?

Not quite what you were looking for, but saw this a while ago...

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org...

Hope it helps...

I will take a look at it, but I do recommend (at minimum) this paper.
http://www.nazarethmyth.info...

If it was just Rene Salm that was positing this idea, I would probably be more agnostic about it. The thing is, there are some PhD historians who actually agree with him (Robert M Price just to name one), and so I find it hard to simply dismiss what he says.

Most criticisms about him are either attacks about credentials or based on claims that are not actually published through academia.

Will do (once I'm done with my current debate). These things are always tough, because if the premise is that Nazareth was settled after the fall of Jerusalem, then the question is did they settle empty land, or did they settle what was perhaps a small hamlet? I was helping out a friend of my who was taking humanities and he was asking an engineering question about river (more geology than engineering) moving because a town had relocated several miles away in a period of less than 50 years.

There is evidence that Nazareth was actually a town until around 700 BCE.
So, if it was resettled around 70 CE, that would be about 800 years between when it last stood and when it was reinhabited.

The one thing I have to say about the article you provided, it seems just like many others I have read where they say (dated to X) without explaining how they know that. That is important for fact checking.

I do want an archeologist to answer me one question one of these days... How the heck do cities get buried? I drive down the highway and see a hundred year old farm shack. It may be dilapidated, but it hasn't been covered over with dirt. Yet a city like Jerusalem which has been constantly occupied is finding ruins of Roman structure buried. How does that happen?!?
#TheApatheticNihilistPartyofAmerica
#WarOnDDO
Emmarie
Posts: 1,907
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4/7/2016 11:36:38 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?
I only skimmed this article and copied and pasted the last sentence.

http://www.academia.edu...
The best explanation seems to be a very small settlement, populated by Jews who had relocated from Judea as part of an intentional program to strengthen the Jewish character of the Galilee. Nazareth probably did not have a synagogue in the first two decades of the first century.
37
In the time of Jesus the population may have been fewer than 300 persons, and we might imagine that the majority of them would have been children.
SNP1
Posts: 2,407
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4/7/2016 11:48:26 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 11:36:38 PM, Emmarie wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?
I only skimmed this article and copied and pasted the last sentence.

http://www.academia.edu...
The best explanation seems to be a very small settlement, populated by Jews who had relocated from Judea as part of an intentional program to strengthen the Jewish character of the Galilee. Nazareth probably did not have a synagogue in the first two decades of the first century.
37
In the time of Jesus the population may have been fewer than 300 persons, and we might imagine that the majority of them would have been children.

Thank you, just downloaded it. Reading time!
#TheApatheticNihilistPartyofAmerica
#WarOnDDO
Emmarie
Posts: 1,907
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4/7/2016 11:54:27 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 11:48:26 PM, SNP1 wrote:
At 4/7/2016 11:36:38 PM, Emmarie wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?
I only skimmed this article and copied and pasted the last sentence.

http://www.academia.edu...
The best explanation seems to be a very small settlement, populated by Jews who had relocated from Judea as part of an intentional program to strengthen the Jewish character of the Galilee. Nazareth probably did not have a synagogue in the first two decades of the first century.
37
In the time of Jesus the population may have been fewer than 300 persons, and we might imagine that the majority of them would have been children.

Thank you, just downloaded it. Reading time!
your welcome :)
Emmarie
Posts: 1,907
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4/8/2016 12:22:37 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?

here's a book - very recent - wasn't able to review it or download it, so I don't know what any conclusions are.
The Real Jesus of Nazareth: New Evidence from History and Archaeology abut Jesus and the Early Christians
http://www.amazon.com...
http://stikerdinding.net...
SNP1
Posts: 2,407
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4/8/2016 1:05:06 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/8/2016 12:22:37 AM, Emmarie wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?

here's a book - very recent - wasn't able to review it or download it, so I don't know what any conclusions are.
The Real Jesus of Nazareth: New Evidence from History and Archaeology abut Jesus and the Early Christians
http://www.amazon.com...
http://stikerdinding.net...

I am going to wait to see some good reviews about the book.

The paper linked does, ultimately, lead me to still have to read its sources that date the coins and pottery fragments (as Rene Salm has said that they haven't actually been confirmed through proper academia).
#TheApatheticNihilistPartyofAmerica
#WarOnDDO
Emmarie
Posts: 1,907
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4/8/2016 1:17:26 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/8/2016 1:05:06 AM, SNP1 wrote:
At 4/8/2016 12:22:37 AM, Emmarie wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?

here's a book - very recent - wasn't able to review it or download it, so I don't know what any conclusions are.
The Real Jesus of Nazareth: New Evidence from History and Archaeology abut Jesus and the Early Christians
http://www.amazon.com...
http://stikerdinding.net...

I am going to wait to see some good reviews about the book.

The paper linked does, ultimately, lead me to still have to read its sources that date the coins and pottery fragments (as Rene Salm has said that they haven't actually been confirmed through proper academia).

I know little about academia - I was throw out of college when I wanted to return in 2007, for disagreeing with my professor. She was a drama queen who blew everything out of proportion. I do respect academic discourse and the process. I'll be interested in reading your findings.
dee-em
Posts: 6,497
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4/8/2016 2:28:26 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 4/7/2016 11:36:38 PM, Emmarie wrote:
At 4/7/2016 10:07:06 PM, SNP1 wrote:
I am looking for an actual in depth criticism of Rene Salm's book "The Myth of Nazareth" as well as an in depth book/report on the opposing side (that Nazareth did exist during the time of Jesus).

Does anybody know a source I can use?
I only skimmed this article and copied and pasted the last sentence.

http://www.academia.edu...

The best explanation seems to be a very small settlement, populated by Jews who had relocated from Judea as part of an intentional program to strengthen the Jewish character of the Galilee. Nazareth probably did not have a synagogue in the first two decades of the first century. 37
In the time of Jesus the population may have been fewer than 300 persons, and we might imagine that the majority of them would have been children.


Useless. It accepts the Catholic-sponsored "archaeology" uncritically and does not even attempt to address the issues raised by Salm.

The giveaway is avoiding the issue of the tombs. Jews would not have made a settlement on top of burial tombs. End of story.

http://www.jesusneverexisted.com...

In his histories, Josephus has a lot to say about Galilee (an area of barely 900 square miles). During the first Jewish war, in the 60s AD, Josephus led a military campaign back and forth across the tiny province. Josephus mentions 45 cities and villages of Galilee --- yet Nazareth not at all.

Josephus does, however, have something to say about Japha (Yafa, Japhia), a village just one mile to the southwest of Nazareth where he himself lived for a time (Life 52).

A glance at a topographical map of the region shows that Nazareth is located at one end of a valley, bounded on three sides by hills. Natural access to this valley is from the southwest.

Before the first Jewish war, Japha was of a reasonable size. We know it had an early synagogue, destroyed by the Romans in 67 AD (Revue Biblique 1921, 434f). In that war, it's inhabitants were massacred (Wars 3, 7.31). Josephus reports that 15,000 were killed by Trajan's troops. The survivors --- 2,130 woman and children --- were carried away into captivity. A one-time active city was completely and decisively wiped out.

Now where on earth did the 1st century inhabitants of Japha bury their dead? In the tombs further up the valley!

With Japha's complete destruction, tomb use at the Nazareth site would have ended. The unnamed necropolis today lies under the modern city of Nazareth.

At a later time --- as pottery and other finds indicate --- the Nazareth site was re-occupied. This was after the Bar Kochba revolt of 135 AD and the general Jewish exodus from Judea to Galilee. The new hamlet was based on subsistence farming and was quite unrelated to the previous tomb usage by the people of Japha.