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God is not worthy of worship

Seagull
Posts: 88
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4/23/2016 1:25:11 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
I realize the nature of this topic is likely to garner the contempt of many. I respectfully ask that you spare me any personal attacks. I sincerely want to discuss this topic. I am not motivated to do so out of a desire to disrespect anyone or their beliefs. Rather, I desire this discussion as a chance to share ideas.

I have a debate challenge on this topic http://www.debate.org...

Because of this challenge, rather then expound on why I do not believe "God" is worthy of worship here in this forum, I would invite people to do both of the following;

1: Define God, especially if you believe in one.

2: Describe why or why not such a God is worthy of worship.
RuvDraba
Posts: 6,033
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4/23/2016 11:34:36 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/23/2016 1:25:11 AM, Seagull wrote:
I realize the nature of this topic is likely to garner the contempt of many. I respectfully ask that you spare me any personal attacks. I sincerely want to discuss this topic. I am not motivated to do so out of a desire to disrespect anyone or their beliefs. Rather, I desire this discussion as a chance to share ideas.

I have a debate challenge on this topic http://www.debate.org...

Because of this challenge, rather then expound on why I do not believe "God" is worthy of worship here in this forum, I would invite people to do both of the following;

1: Define God, especially if you believe in one.
Epistemologically, I do not believe God is well-defined enough to be worth entertaining, even as a conjecture. It's dismissable for similar reasons under which I've previously argued for dismissing the KCA, in another thread. [http://www.debate.org...]

2: Describe why or why not such a God is worthy of worship.
Firstly, it should be acknowledged that in literal terms, what humans worship is not a god, but a story told by clerics and other theocrats -- that is, a conjecture or a promise of a god.

But even setting aside epistemological problems in the definitions of such stories, neither creating this universe (if that occurred), nor magically interfering in human affairs (ditto) are in themselves worthy of worship.

Both are conjectured exercises of power, and I think the most important ethical questions we can ask anyone claiming power are those of former British politician Tony Benn, namely: What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you?

We can't actually observe anyone claiming to exercise divine power, except clerics and other theocrats, and I'm not aware of any of them able to answer that question to my satisfaction. On the other hand, if a wondrous being actually appeared on the planet, tossing miracles about, those would still be legitimate questions to ask it, and I cannot conceive of answers that would satisfy me there, either.

So in conclusion, I hold that:
1) No humans are worshiping gods anyway, only poorly-formed conjectures they cannot validate or verify;
2) As normally described, God is not meaningful enough to be even conjectured to exist. Thus worshiping it isn't even worshiping a valid conjecture; and finally
3) Even in the unlikely event that a godlike being existed and manifested, it is improbable that a godlike being would be worthy of worship in the first place.