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Was Jesus a Psychedelic Mushroom?

dee-em
Posts: 6,497
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6/15/2016 1:19:12 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
There is a book titled "The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross" by John Marco Allegro:

https://en.wikipedia.org...

Allegro believed he could prove, through etymology, that the roots of Christianity, and many other religions, lay in fertility cults, and that cult practices, such as ingesting visionary plants to perceive the mind of God, persisted into the early Christian era, and to some unspecified extent into the 13th century with reoccurrences in the 18th century and mid-20th century, as he interprets the fresco of the Plaincourault Chapel to be an accurate depiction of the ritual ingestion of Amanita muscaria as the Eucharist. Allegro argued that Jesus never existed as a historical figure and was a mythological creation of early Christians under the influence of psychoactive mushroom extracts such as psilocybin.[1]

His book was ridiculed when originally published but some of his ideas are now being reconsidered. More here:

http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com...

Has anyone else encountered this idea? Do you find it plausible?
janesix
Posts: 3,491
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6/15/2016 9:01:24 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/15/2016 1:19:12 PM, dee-em wrote:
There is a book titled "The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross" by John Marco Allegro:

https://en.wikipedia.org...

Allegro believed he could prove, through etymology, that the roots of Christianity, and many other religions, lay in fertility cults, and that cult practices, such as ingesting visionary plants to perceive the mind of God, persisted into the early Christian era, and to some unspecified extent into the 13th century with reoccurrences in the 18th century and mid-20th century, as he interprets the fresco of the Plaincourault Chapel to be an accurate depiction of the ritual ingestion of Amanita muscaria as the Eucharist. Allegro argued that Jesus never existed as a historical figure and was a mythological creation of early Christians under the influence of psychoactive mushroom extracts such as psilocybin.[1]

His book was ridiculed when originally published but some of his ideas are now being reconsidered. More here:

http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com...

Has anyone else encountered this idea? Do you find it plausible?

Psychadelics open the mind to altered states of consciousness, where archetypes such as the redeemer can be accessed.
Willows
Posts: 2,084
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6/16/2016 1:38:39 AM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/15/2016 1:19:12 PM, dee-em wrote:
There is a book titled "The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross" by John Marco Allegro:

https://en.wikipedia.org...

Allegro believed he could prove, through etymology, that the roots of Christianity, and many other religions, lay in fertility cults, and that cult practices, such as ingesting visionary plants to perceive the mind of God, persisted into the early Christian era, and to some unspecified extent into the 13th century with reoccurrences in the 18th century and mid-20th century, as he interprets the fresco of the Plaincourault Chapel to be an accurate depiction of the ritual ingestion of Amanita muscaria as the Eucharist. Allegro argued that Jesus never existed as a historical figure and was a mythological creation of early Christians under the influence of psychoactive mushroom extracts such as psilocybin.[1]

His book was ridiculed when originally published but some of his ideas are now being reconsidered. More here:

http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com...

Has anyone else encountered this idea? Do you find it plausible?

I had a look at the website which I find interesting but those ideas are way out there in space. When I see the word "conspiracy" alarm bells ring and I think "here we go again" . The idea is similar to the others on the website, for example the flat earth conspiracy. The "logic " used is zetetics, the principal being that nothing can be proved 100%. Therefore if there is a 0.9% possibility of something being so then you find some flimsy evidence to support it thus confirming it.

The boring and down to earth reality, so far as the history we knows goes something like this......the first Christian church started in Armenia and was discretely and indirectly set up by the government of the day, taking advantage of an already deeply superstitious society. To give it authenticity some hurriedly assembled ancient scrolls were collated, sent to Greece for translation (with a bit of editing by the authorities) then called the bible. This gave the authorities enormous powers to enforce their wills upon the masses and has been used to great effect for centuries since. Although the effect has all but disappeared in today's western societies it was at its peak during the days of Henry VIII. He used religion and the bible (of which he was very well scholared) to brutal and deadly effect in suppressing the masses to achieve his goals.
We can get a pretty good idea of this oppressive disgusting form of governance in practice at looking at the few fundamentalist governments still in power around the world.
On a lighter note, in my younger days we played records and the theory was that if you played Black Sabbath backwards at 78 rpm you would see God, man.
Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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6/16/2016 2:47:37 AM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/15/2016 1:19:12 PM, dee-em wrote:
There is a book titled "The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross" by John Marco Allegro:

https://en.wikipedia.org...

Allegro believed he could prove, through etymology, that the roots of Christianity, and many other religions, lay in fertility cults, and that cult practices, such as ingesting visionary plants to perceive the mind of God, persisted into the early Christian era, and to some unspecified extent into the 13th century with reoccurrences in the 18th century and mid-20th century, as he interprets the fresco of the Plaincourault Chapel to be an accurate depiction of the ritual ingestion of Amanita muscaria as the Eucharist. Allegro argued that Jesus never existed as a historical figure and was a mythological creation of early Christians under the influence of psychoactive mushroom extracts such as psilocybin.[1]

His book was ridiculed when originally published but some of his ideas are now being reconsidered. More here:

http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com...

Has anyone else encountered this idea? Do you find it plausible?

Jesus absolutely was a psychedelic mushroom. Wake up sheeple!
Meh!
dee-em
Posts: 6,497
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6/16/2016 1:48:33 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/16/2016 1:38:39 AM, Willows wrote:
At 6/15/2016 1:19:12 PM, dee-em wrote:
There is a book titled "The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross" by John Marco Allegro:

https://en.wikipedia.org...

Allegro believed he could prove, through etymology, that the roots of Christianity, and many other religions, lay in fertility cults, and that cult practices, such as ingesting visionary plants to perceive the mind of God, persisted into the early Christian era, and to some unspecified extent into the 13th century with reoccurrences in the 18th century and mid-20th century, as he interprets the fresco of the Plaincourault Chapel to be an accurate depiction of the ritual ingestion of Amanita muscaria as the Eucharist. Allegro argued that Jesus never existed as a historical figure and was a mythological creation of early Christians under the influence of psychoactive mushroom extracts such as psilocybin.[1]

His book was ridiculed when originally published but some of his ideas are now being reconsidered. More here:

http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com...

Has anyone else encountered this idea? Do you find it plausible?

I had a look at the website which I find interesting but those ideas are way out there in space. When I see the word "conspiracy" alarm bells ring and I think "here we go again" . The idea is similar to the others on the website, for example the flat earth conspiracy. The "logic " used is zetetics, the principal being that nothing can be proved 100%. Therefore if there is a 0.9% possibility of something being so then you find some flimsy evidence to support it thus confirming it.

Zetetics is just skeptical inquiry. I'm not sure where you are getting your definition from. Also, you seem to be committing the genetic fallacy as a means of dismissing the content lightly.

The boring and down to earth reality, so far as the history we knows goes something like this......the first Christian church started in Armenia and was discretely and indirectly set up by the government of the day, taking advantage of an already deeply superstitious society. To give it authenticity some hurriedly assembled ancient scrolls were collated, sent to Greece for translation (with a bit of editing by the authorities) then called the bible.

Ahem, speaking of conspiracy theories. Nothing is ever quite that simple. The synoptic gospels were written in Greek, at different locations and to different audiences. That is why the competing (and often contradictory) gospels exist. 'Matthew' wasn't satisfied with "Mark' and thought he could improve on it. "Luke' thought he could improve on 'Matthew'. To suggest that the Jesus story came entirely out of ancient scrolls in one single effort is rather naive. Then there are the Pauline works which define most of Christian doctrine. Clearly Paul was reading the Septuagint (as were the gospel authors) but he was coming up with some novel ideas which have no echo in ancient Hebrew (or Greek) writings.

This gave the authorities enormous powers to enforce their wills upon the masses and has been used to great effect for centuries since.

Yes, the Roman Catholic Church inheriting the Roman Empire.

Although the effect has all but disappeared in today's western societies it was at its peak during the days of Henry VIII. He used religion and the bible (of which he was very well scholared) to brutal and deadly effect in suppressing the masses to achieve his goals. We can get a pretty good idea of this oppressive disgusting form of governance in practice at looking at the few fundamentalist governments still in power around the world.

On a lighter note, in my younger days we played records and the theory was that if you played Black Sabbath backwards at 78 rpm you would see God, man.

Hmmm. I was a big Sabbath fan and I don't remember that. There were rumours about playing some Beatles songs backwards and hearing messages about Paul being dead. :-)
dee-em
Posts: 6,497
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6/16/2016 1:49:36 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/16/2016 2:47:37 AM, Axonly wrote:
At 6/15/2016 1:19:12 PM, dee-em wrote:
There is a book titled "The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross" by John Marco Allegro:

https://en.wikipedia.org...

Allegro believed he could prove, through etymology, that the roots of Christianity, and many other religions, lay in fertility cults, and that cult practices, such as ingesting visionary plants to perceive the mind of God, persisted into the early Christian era, and to some unspecified extent into the 13th century with reoccurrences in the 18th century and mid-20th century, as he interprets the fresco of the Plaincourault Chapel to be an accurate depiction of the ritual ingestion of Amanita muscaria as the Eucharist. Allegro argued that Jesus never existed as a historical figure and was a mythological creation of early Christians under the influence of psychoactive mushroom extracts such as psilocybin.[1]

His book was ridiculed when originally published but some of his ideas are now being reconsidered. More here:

http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com...

Has anyone else encountered this idea? Do you find it plausible?

Jesus absolutely was a psychedelic mushroom. Wake up sheeple!

Concise and to the point. I like it. :-)