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Voluntary Euthanasia

Willows
Posts: 2,068
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9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?
Skeptical1
Posts: 698
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9/26/2016 3:34:27 PM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?

How inhumane to insist that someone who may be experiencing incredible pain and discomfort, with no hope of improvement, could be denied the choice to terminate their own suffering.

What I find slightly strange is that, as you say, in the main, it is theists who oppose voluntary euthanasia - the same ones who believe there is an eternity of bliss waiting, and it's the ones who believe that this life is the only one you get who are willing to let go. To me, that's ironic.
slo1
Posts: 4,361
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9/26/2016 4:16:12 PM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?

I agree there are some rather difficult end of life decisions, in particular when the individual in question is not conscious and of strong mind. There absolutely need to be strong regulation and guardrails if end of life programs are implemented.

Pain is one of our most difficult conditions to treat. When one is terminal and has pain it is indeed understandable why an individual would want to control when and how.

I just read an article where a beautiful young person made that decision and had organized what amounted to her being killed. It was incredibly sorrowful reading of this friends experience seeing her friend give herself a shot of drugs that ended her life.

I personally think that if everyone could go surrounded by friends and family, it is a great reminder of the person, love, and value of life.

Our western views of death are really generated from fear and superstition generated from religious belief. Death does not need to be embraced, however, allowing people to die with dignity and on their terms should be a fundamental right.

It is rather ironic that we allow people the right to deny medical services due to religious belief, but don't allow people to adminster a humane death to themselves when certain conditions are met.
tarantula
Posts: 863
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9/26/2016 4:50:09 PM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?

Everyone should have the absolute right to end their lives if they are of sound mind and terminally ill, with help if necessary.
Chloe8
Posts: 2,614
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9/26/2016 11:51:02 PM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?

Yes if someone is of sound mind, free from mental health issues and suffering extreme pain or terminal illness it should be their right to put an end to their miserable existence. Denying someone that right is cruel.
"I don't need experience.to knock you out. I'm a man. that's all I need to beat you and any woman."

Fatihah, in his delusion that he could knock out any woman while bragging about being able to knock me out. An example of 7th century Islamic thinking inspired by his hero the paedophile Muhammad.
janesix
Posts: 3,485
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9/28/2016 1:12:22 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/26/2016 11:51:02 PM, Chloe8 wrote:
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?

Yes if someone is of sound mind, free from mental health issues and suffering extreme pain or terminal illness it should be their right to put an end to their miserable existence. Denying someone that right is cruel.
Why shouldnt i, as a schizophrenic, also have the right to die and end my suffering? That is absolute bs.
Stymie13
Posts: 2,162
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9/28/2016 1:23:31 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
The OP didn't paint with an incredibly broad brush there... nope, not at all. Because all theists think exactly the same.....

Giminy crickets.
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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9/28/2016 2:16:18 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?

Most people consider it humane to put our dog down when it is suffering yet many of those same people insist that suffering humans be forced to endure their agony against their will. Some people pay steep consequences for the hypocrisy of others.
matt8800
Posts: 2,077
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9/28/2016 2:22:46 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/28/2016 1:23:31 AM, Stymie13 wrote:
The OP didn't paint with an incredibly broad brush there... nope, not at all. Because all theists think exactly the same.....

Giminy crickets.

"Support for euthanasia is related to Americans' underlying religiosity. The more frequently an American attends religious services, the less likely he or she is to support euthanasia. Less than half (48%) of those who frequent their places of worship weekly are likely to support the idea of a doctor "ending a patient's life by some painless means," compared with three in four Americans who attend services nearly weekly (74%) and 82% of those who go less often."

http://www.gallup.com...

This is why atheists have a problem with theists. Too many vote according to how their pastor tells them to and we have to live in a world with their stupid laws. If we had less theists in this country, euthanasia would be legal. That's a fact.
Willows
Posts: 2,068
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9/28/2016 5:32:37 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/28/2016 2:22:46 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 9/28/2016 1:23:31 AM, Stymie13 wrote:
The OP didn't paint with an incredibly broad brush there... nope, not at all. Because all theists think exactly the same.....

Giminy crickets.

"Support for euthanasia is related to Americans' underlying religiosity. The more frequently an American attends religious services, the less likely he or she is to support euthanasia. Less than half (48%) of those who frequent their places of worship weekly are likely to support the idea of a doctor "ending a patient's life by some painless means," compared with three in four Americans who attend services nearly weekly (74%) and 82% of those who go less often."

http://www.gallup.com...

This is why atheists have a problem with theists. Too many vote according to how their pastor tells them to and we have to live in a world with their stupid laws. If we had less theists in this country, euthanasia would be legal. That's a fact.

I tend to agree. It is common knowledge that doctors assist patients by speeding up the process through higher doses of drugs and voluntary euthanasia at home is becoming more widespread.
Here in Australia, we have a well-known advocate similar to Jack Kevorkian who is pushing the boundaries in order to change the laws which are so bogged down by vocal religious groups.
These "right to life" activists have no consideration whatsoever for human dignity and seem to care more for themselves, getting brownie points from above.
skipsaweirdo
Posts: 1,872
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9/28/2016 5:51:50 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?
You haven't met all theists so you have no idea what theists think about this issue. Btw, I'm a theist, I say kill anyone who wants to die.
Willows
Posts: 2,068
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9/28/2016 6:37:50 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/28/2016 5:51:50 AM, skipsaweirdo wrote:
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?
You haven't met all theists so you have no idea what theists think about this issue. Btw, I'm a theist, I say kill anyone who wants to die.

To conclude that I have no idea what theists think because I have not met all theists is very typical of the sort of distorted logic that I am pointing out here.

Nevertheless, are not you going against your own rules about euthanasia?
Stymie13
Posts: 2,162
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9/28/2016 11:08:59 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/28/2016 2:22:46 AM, matt8800 wrote:
At 9/28/2016 1:23:31 AM, Stymie13 wrote:
The OP didn't paint with an incredibly broad brush there... nope, not at all. Because all theists think exactly the same.....

Giminy crickets.

"Support for euthanasia is related to Americans' underlying religiosity. The more frequently an American attends religious services, the less likely he or she is to support euthanasia. Less than half (48%) of those who frequent their places of worship weekly are likely to support the idea of a doctor "ending a patient's life by some painless means," compared with three in four Americans who attend services nearly weekly (74%) and 82% of those who go less often."

http://www.gallup.com...

This is why atheists have a problem with theists. Too many vote according to how their pastor tells them to and we have to live in a world with their stupid laws. If we had less theists in this country, euthanasia would be legal. That's a fact.

8 states have had legislative movements... 8. Mostly because it is de factor legal already with DNR's, advance directives, and living will. All of mine say 'pull it, leave the decision only to my advance directive'. So instead of trying to make it a religious contention (where there is some objection) ask why state legislatures fail to forward an actual bill.
skipsaweirdo
Posts: 1,872
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9/28/2016 11:56:15 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/28/2016 6:37:50 AM, Willows wrote:
At 9/28/2016 5:51:50 AM, skipsaweirdo wrote:
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?
You haven't met all theists so you have no idea what theists think about this issue. Btw, I'm a theist, I say kill anyone who wants to die.

To conclude that I have no idea what theists think because I have not met all theists is very typical of the sort of distorted logic that I am pointing out here.
The only distorted logic is to conclude you know what they all think. You simply know what some think or at least you think you do.
Nevertheless, are not you going against your own rules about euthanasia?
Not being able to be perfect in the path that one follows is also a rule or teaching you could say. You would know that if you've actually read all that is said. Theists aren't perfect as you seem to think.
Chloe8
Posts: 2,614
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9/28/2016 9:28:24 PM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/28/2016 1:12:22 AM, janesix wrote:
At 9/26/2016 11:51:02 PM, Chloe8 wrote:
At 9/26/2016 10:42:37 AM, Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, it is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, there can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?
Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?

Yes if someone is of sound mind, free from mental health issues and suffering extreme pain or terminal illness it should be their right to put an end to their miserable existence. Denying someone that right is cruel.
Why shouldnt i, as a schizophrenic, also have the right to die and end my suffering? That is absolute bs.

Sorry I didn't mean it like that. What I was trying to say was people should not be allowed to commit suicide if a mental health problem that is potentially treatable or controlable is clouding their judgment.
"I don't need experience.to knock you out. I'm a man. that's all I need to beat you and any woman."

Fatihah, in his delusion that he could knock out any woman while bragging about being able to knock me out. An example of 7th century Islamic thinking inspired by his hero the paedophile Muhammad.